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History Creator / YasujiroOzu

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* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: Ozu is famous for making a whole bunch of movies with general themes about family relationships, parent-child relationships in particular, all done in an understated, contemplative style. Visually, his films are well-known for their lack of camera movement and low camera angles, and his constant violation of the 180-degree rule. However, this style took some time to evolve. His early movies have plenty of camera movement and are in much more varied genres. ''A Straightforward Boy'' is a "Ransom of Red Chief"-inspired comedy about a child who is kidnapped but proves supremely irritating to his kidnappers. ''Dragnet Girl'' is a gangster drama that could have been made by Warner Brothers.

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* ''Film/WhereNowAreTheDreamsOfYouth'' (1932)


** Shot/reverse-shots used for many dialogue scenes between two of his characters.

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** Shot/reverse-shots used for many dialogue scenes between two of his characters. Notable as this is a violation of one of the fundamentals of camera placement, [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/180-degree_rule the 180-degree rule]], but he clearly liked it as a way to immerse the viewer in the conversation.


* ''I Was Born, But...'' (1932)

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* ''I Was Born, But...'' ''Film/IWasBornBut'' (1932)



* ThemeNaming: His movies! ''Late Spring'', ''Early Summer'', ''Early Spring'', ''Late Autumn'', ''The End of Summer'', ''An Autumn Afternoon''...and then there's ''Tokyo Chorus'', ''Tokyo Story'', and ''Tokyo Twilight''.

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* ThemeNaming: His movies! ''Late Spring'', ''Early Summer'', ''Early Spring'', ''Late Autumn'', ''The End of Summer'', ''An Autumn Afternoon''...and then there's ''Tokyo Chorus'', ''Tokyo Story'', ''Woman of Tokyo'', ''An Inn in Tokyo'', and ''Tokyo Twilight''.Twilight''. His earlier films include ''I Graduated, But...'', ''I Flunked, But...'' and ''I Was Born, But...''.


Ozu's reputation within Japan was uncontested in his lifetime. He was seen as a senior statesman and notable intervened on the behalf of young Creator/AkiraKurosawa when his first film ''Film/SanshiroSugata'' irritated some producers and censors. But everyone within Japan was convinced that his films wouldn't attract an international audience because they were "too Japanese", with many convinced that Kurosawa attracted attention because he was "too Western". The actual story is a good deal more complicated of course. Ozu was by all accounts an avid cinephile, who loved Hollywood films (Creator/KingVidor and Creator/ErnstLubitsch were his favorites), and his most famous film, ''Tokyo Story'' was a remake of ''Film/MakeWayForTomorrow'' by Creator/LeoMcCarey and Ozu never missed a chance to flaunt his love for movies by putting movie posters of his latest favorites in the background of his films. Indeed David Bordwell argued that Ozu was one of the most cinephilic directors before the UsefulNotes/FrenchNewWave. The distinct style of Ozu's films, the "tatami shots", the lack of camera movements, the complete violation of the classical editing pattern (i.e. the 180 degree axis and shot/reverse shot staging of dialogue scenes), initially led many to assume that Ozu was a Japanese naive artist, i.e. a kind of primitive making films in line with Japanese culture, but Ozu was vastly different from Japanese cinema as well. When Ozu finally did get international recognition, courtesy Donald Richie (the American GI stationed in Japan who became a major scholar of Japanese culture and cinema), he was bemused with the many interpretations of his films from international viewers, joking at one point, "[[{{Orientalism}} when Americans don't understand something Japanese, they say it's Zen]]."

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Ozu's reputation within Japan was uncontested in his lifetime. He was seen as a senior statesman and notable notably intervened on the behalf of young Creator/AkiraKurosawa when his first film ''Film/SanshiroSugata'' film, ''Film/SanshiroSugata'', irritated some producers and censors. But everyone within Japan was convinced that his films wouldn't attract an international audience because they were "too Japanese", with many convinced that Kurosawa attracted attention because he was "too Western". The actual story is a good deal more complicated of course. Ozu was by all accounts an avid cinephile, who loved Hollywood films (Creator/KingVidor and Creator/ErnstLubitsch were his favorites), and his most famous film, ''Tokyo Story'' was a remake of ''Film/MakeWayForTomorrow'' by Creator/LeoMcCarey and Ozu never missed a chance to flaunt his love for movies by putting movie posters of his latest favorites in the background of his films. Indeed David Bordwell argued that Ozu was one of the most cinephilic directors before the UsefulNotes/FrenchNewWave. The distinct style of Ozu's films, the "tatami shots", the lack of camera movements, the complete violation of the classical editing pattern (i.e. the 180 degree axis and shot/reverse shot staging of dialogue scenes), initially led many to assume that Ozu was a Japanese naive artist, i.e. a kind of primitive making films in line with Japanese culture, but Ozu was vastly different from Japanese cinema as well. When Ozu finally did get international recognition, courtesy Donald Richie (the American GI stationed in Japan who became a major scholar of Japanese culture and cinema), he was bemused with the many interpretations of his films from international viewers, joking at one point, "[[{{Orientalism}} when Americans don't understand something Japanese, they say it's Zen]]."


* ''Passing Fancy'' (1933)

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* ''Passing Fancy'' ''Film/PassingFancy'' (1933)

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* ''Film/AHenInTheWind'' (1948)

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* ''Film/DragnetGirl'' (1933)

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* ''Film/AStraightforwardBoy'' (1929)


Ozu's reputation within Japan was uncontested in his lifetime. He was seen as a senior statesman and notable intervened on the behalf of young Creator/AkiraKurosawa when his first film ''Sanshiro Sugata'' irritated some producers and censors. But everyone within Japan was convinced that his films wouldn't attract an international audience because they were "too Japanese", with many convinced that Kurosawa attracted attention because he was "too Western". The actual story is a good deal more complicated of course. Ozu was by all accounts an avid cinephile, who loved Hollywood films (Creator/KingVidor and Creator/ErnstLubitsch were his favorites), and his most famous film, ''Tokyo Story'' was a remake of ''Film/MakeWayForTomorrow'' by Creator/LeoMcCarey and Ozu never missed a chance to flaunt his love for movies by putting movie posters of his latest favorites in the background of his films. Indeed David Bordwell argued that Ozu was one of the most cinephilic directors before the UsefulNotes/FrenchNewWave. The distinct style of Ozu's films, the "tatami shots", the lack of camera movements, the complete violation of the classical editing pattern (i.e. the 180 degree axis and shot/reverse shot staging of dialogue scenes), initially led many to assume that Ozu was a Japanese naive artist, i.e. a kind of primitive making films in line with Japanese culture, but Ozu was vastly different from Japanese cinema as well. When Ozu finally did get international recognition, courtesy Donald Richie (the American GI stationed in Japan who became a major scholar of Japanese culture and cinema), he was bemused with the many interpretations of his films from international viewers, joking at one point, "[[{{Orientalism}} when Americans don't understand something Japanese, they say it's Zen]]."

to:

Ozu's reputation within Japan was uncontested in his lifetime. He was seen as a senior statesman and notable intervened on the behalf of young Creator/AkiraKurosawa when his first film ''Sanshiro Sugata'' ''Film/SanshiroSugata'' irritated some producers and censors. But everyone within Japan was convinced that his films wouldn't attract an international audience because they were "too Japanese", with many convinced that Kurosawa attracted attention because he was "too Western". The actual story is a good deal more complicated of course. Ozu was by all accounts an avid cinephile, who loved Hollywood films (Creator/KingVidor and Creator/ErnstLubitsch were his favorites), and his most famous film, ''Tokyo Story'' was a remake of ''Film/MakeWayForTomorrow'' by Creator/LeoMcCarey and Ozu never missed a chance to flaunt his love for movies by putting movie posters of his latest favorites in the background of his films. Indeed David Bordwell argued that Ozu was one of the most cinephilic directors before the UsefulNotes/FrenchNewWave. The distinct style of Ozu's films, the "tatami shots", the lack of camera movements, the complete violation of the classical editing pattern (i.e. the 180 degree axis and shot/reverse shot staging of dialogue scenes), initially led many to assume that Ozu was a Japanese naive artist, i.e. a kind of primitive making films in line with Japanese culture, but Ozu was vastly different from Japanese cinema as well. When Ozu finally did get international recognition, courtesy Donald Richie (the American GI stationed in Japan who became a major scholar of Japanese culture and cinema), he was bemused with the many interpretations of his films from international viewers, joking at one point, "[[{{Orientalism}} when Americans don't understand something Japanese, they say it's Zen]]."


* ''The End of Summer'' (1961)

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* ''The End of Summer'' ''Film/TheEndOfSummer'' (1961)


* ''The Only Son'' (1936)

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* ''The Only Son'' ''Film/TheOnlySon'' (1936)

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