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Ozu's reputation within Japan was uncontested in his lifetime. He was seen as a senior statesman and notable intervened on the behalf of young Creator/AkiraKurosawa when his first film ''Film/SanshiroSugata'' irritated some producers and censors. But everyone within Japan was convinced that his films wouldn't attract an international audience because they were "too Japanese", with many convinced that Kurosawa attracted attention because he was "too Western". The actual story is a good deal more complicated of course. Ozu was by all accounts an avid cinephile, who loved Hollywood films (Creator/KingVidor and Creator/ErnstLubitsch were his favorites), and his most famous film, ''Tokyo Story'' was a remake of ''Film/MakeWayForTomorrow'' by Creator/LeoMcCarey and Ozu never missed a chance to flaunt his love for movies by putting movie posters of his latest favorites in the background of his films. Indeed David Bordwell argued that Ozu was one of the most cinephilic directors before the UsefulNotes/FrenchNewWave. The distinct style of Ozu's films, the "tatami shots", the lack of camera movements, the complete violation of the classical editing pattern (i.e. the 180 degree axis and shot/reverse shot staging of dialogue scenes), initially led many to assume that Ozu was a Japanese naive artist, i.e. a kind of primitive making films in line with Japanese culture, but Ozu was vastly different from Japanese cinema as well. When Ozu finally did get international recognition, courtesy Donald Richie (the American GI stationed in Japan who became a major scholar of Japanese culture and cinema), he was bemused with the many interpretations of his films from international viewers, joking at one point, "[[{{Orientalism}} when Americans don't understand something Japanese, they say it's Zen]]."

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Ozu's reputation within Japan was uncontested in his lifetime. He was seen as a senior statesman and notable notably intervened on the behalf of young Creator/AkiraKurosawa when his first film ''Film/SanshiroSugata'' film, ''Film/SanshiroSugata'', irritated some producers and censors. But everyone within Japan was convinced that his films wouldn't attract an international audience because they were "too Japanese", with many convinced that Kurosawa attracted attention because he was "too Western". The actual story is a good deal more complicated of course. Ozu was by all accounts an avid cinephile, who loved Hollywood films (Creator/KingVidor and Creator/ErnstLubitsch were his favorites), and his most famous film, ''Tokyo Story'' was a remake of ''Film/MakeWayForTomorrow'' by Creator/LeoMcCarey and Ozu never missed a chance to flaunt his love for movies by putting movie posters of his latest favorites in the background of his films. Indeed David Bordwell argued that Ozu was one of the most cinephilic directors before the UsefulNotes/FrenchNewWave. The distinct style of Ozu's films, the "tatami shots", the lack of camera movements, the complete violation of the classical editing pattern (i.e. the 180 degree axis and shot/reverse shot staging of dialogue scenes), initially led many to assume that Ozu was a Japanese naive artist, i.e. a kind of primitive making films in line with Japanese culture, but Ozu was vastly different from Japanese cinema as well. When Ozu finally did get international recognition, courtesy Donald Richie (the American GI stationed in Japan who became a major scholar of Japanese culture and cinema), he was bemused with the many interpretations of his films from international viewers, joking at one point, "[[{{Orientalism}} when Americans don't understand something Japanese, they say it's Zen]]."


* ''Passing Fancy'' (1933)

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* ''Passing Fancy'' ''Film/PassingFancy'' (1933)

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* ''Film/AHenInTheWind'' (1948)

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* ''Film/DragnetGirl'' (1933)

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* ''Film/AStraightforwardBoy'' (1929)


Ozu's reputation within Japan was uncontested in his lifetime. He was seen as a senior statesman and notable intervened on the behalf of young Creator/AkiraKurosawa when his first film ''Sanshiro Sugata'' irritated some producers and censors. But everyone within Japan was convinced that his films wouldn't attract an international audience because they were "too Japanese", with many convinced that Kurosawa attracted attention because he was "too Western". The actual story is a good deal more complicated of course. Ozu was by all accounts an avid cinephile, who loved Hollywood films (Creator/KingVidor and Creator/ErnstLubitsch were his favorites), and his most famous film, ''Tokyo Story'' was a remake of ''Film/MakeWayForTomorrow'' by Creator/LeoMcCarey and Ozu never missed a chance to flaunt his love for movies by putting movie posters of his latest favorites in the background of his films. Indeed David Bordwell argued that Ozu was one of the most cinephilic directors before the UsefulNotes/FrenchNewWave. The distinct style of Ozu's films, the "tatami shots", the lack of camera movements, the complete violation of the classical editing pattern (i.e. the 180 degree axis and shot/reverse shot staging of dialogue scenes), initially led many to assume that Ozu was a Japanese naive artist, i.e. a kind of primitive making films in line with Japanese culture, but Ozu was vastly different from Japanese cinema as well. When Ozu finally did get international recognition, courtesy Donald Richie (the American GI stationed in Japan who became a major scholar of Japanese culture and cinema), he was bemused with the many interpretations of his films from international viewers, joking at one point, "[[{{Orientalism}} when Americans don't understand something Japanese, they say it's Zen]]."

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Ozu's reputation within Japan was uncontested in his lifetime. He was seen as a senior statesman and notable intervened on the behalf of young Creator/AkiraKurosawa when his first film ''Sanshiro Sugata'' ''Film/SanshiroSugata'' irritated some producers and censors. But everyone within Japan was convinced that his films wouldn't attract an international audience because they were "too Japanese", with many convinced that Kurosawa attracted attention because he was "too Western". The actual story is a good deal more complicated of course. Ozu was by all accounts an avid cinephile, who loved Hollywood films (Creator/KingVidor and Creator/ErnstLubitsch were his favorites), and his most famous film, ''Tokyo Story'' was a remake of ''Film/MakeWayForTomorrow'' by Creator/LeoMcCarey and Ozu never missed a chance to flaunt his love for movies by putting movie posters of his latest favorites in the background of his films. Indeed David Bordwell argued that Ozu was one of the most cinephilic directors before the UsefulNotes/FrenchNewWave. The distinct style of Ozu's films, the "tatami shots", the lack of camera movements, the complete violation of the classical editing pattern (i.e. the 180 degree axis and shot/reverse shot staging of dialogue scenes), initially led many to assume that Ozu was a Japanese naive artist, i.e. a kind of primitive making films in line with Japanese culture, but Ozu was vastly different from Japanese cinema as well. When Ozu finally did get international recognition, courtesy Donald Richie (the American GI stationed in Japan who became a major scholar of Japanese culture and cinema), he was bemused with the many interpretations of his films from international viewers, joking at one point, "[[{{Orientalism}} when Americans don't understand something Japanese, they say it's Zen]]."


* ''The End of Summer'' (1961)

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* ''The End of Summer'' ''Film/TheEndOfSummer'' (1961)


* ''The Only Son'' (1936)

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* ''The Only Son'' ''Film/TheOnlySon'' (1936)


* SliceOfLife

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* SliceOfLifeSliceOfLife: Ozu is a very humanist storyteller so his movies stick close to a slice of a persons life.


* ''Floating Weeds'' (1959) - Remake of the 1934 film

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* ''Floating Weeds'' ''Film/FloatingWeeds'' (1959) - Remake of the 1934 film


Yasujiro Ozu (12 December 1903 12 December 1963) is one of the greatest film-makers in the history of Japanese cinema (alongside Creator/KenjiMizoguchi), and in the opinion of cinephiles across the world, one of the greatest film-makers of all time (his rivals being Creator/JeanRenoir, Creator/OrsonWelles, Creator/IngmarBergman, Creator/JohnFord, Creator/AlfredHitchcock).

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Yasujiro Ozu (12 December 1903 12 December 1963) is one of the greatest film-makers in the history of Japanese cinema (alongside Creator/KenjiMizoguchi), cinema, and in the opinion of cinephiles across the world, one of the greatest film-makers of all time (his rivals being Creator/JeanRenoir, Creator/OrsonWelles, Creator/IngmarBergman, Creator/JohnFord, Creator/AlfredHitchcock).time.


* ''An Autumn Afternoon'' (1962)

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* ''An Autumn Afternoon'' ''Film/AnAutumnAfternoon'' (1962)


Yasujiro Ozu (1903-1963) is one of the greatest film-makers in the history of Japanese cinema (alongside Creator/KenjiMizoguchi), and in the opinion of cinephiles across the world, one of the greatest film-makers of all time (his rivals being Creator/JeanRenoir, Creator/OrsonWelles, Creator/IngmarBergman, Creator/JohnFord, Creator/AlfredHitchcock).

to:

Yasujiro Ozu (1903-1963) (12 December 1903 12 December 1963) is one of the greatest film-makers in the history of Japanese cinema (alongside Creator/KenjiMizoguchi), and in the opinion of cinephiles across the world, one of the greatest film-makers of all time (his rivals being Creator/JeanRenoir, Creator/OrsonWelles, Creator/IngmarBergman, Creator/JohnFord, Creator/AlfredHitchcock).


Yasujiro Ozu (19031963) is one of the greatest film-makers in the history of Japanese cinema (alongside Creator/KenjiMizoguchi), and in the opinion of cinephiles across the world, one of the greatest film-makers of all time (his rivals being Creator/JeanRenoir, Creator/OrsonWelles, Creator/IngmarBergman, Creator/JohnFord, Creator/AlfredHitchcock).

to:

Yasujiro Ozu (19031963) (1903-1963) is one of the greatest film-makers in the history of Japanese cinema (alongside Creator/KenjiMizoguchi), and in the opinion of cinephiles across the world, one of the greatest film-makers of all time (his rivals being Creator/JeanRenoir, Creator/OrsonWelles, Creator/IngmarBergman, Creator/JohnFord, Creator/AlfredHitchcock).

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