Follow TV Tropes

Following

History Creator / RachaelRay

Go To



Rachael Domenica Ray is a TV cooking-show host born August 25, 1968, best known for her show ''30 Minute Meals'' on the Creator/FoodNetwork, being one of the [[MsFanservice biggest draws]] for said network's male audience, and for her perky personality. She also hosts a TalkShow, which is syndicated by Creator/{{CBS}}.

to:

Rachael Domenica Ray is a TV cooking-show host born August 25, 1968, 1968 in Glens Falls, New York, best known for her show ''30 Minute Meals'' on the Creator/FoodNetwork, being one of the [[MsFanservice biggest draws]] for said network's male audience, and for her perky personality. She also hosts a TalkShow, which is syndicated by Creator/{{CBS}}.


Rachael Ray is a TV cooking-show host born August 25, 1968, best known for her show ''30 Minute Meals'' on the Creator/FoodNetwork, being one of the [[MsFanservice biggest draws]] for said network's male audience, and for her perky personality. She also hosts a TalkShow, which is syndicated by Creator/{{CBS}}.

to:

Rachael Domenica Ray is a TV cooking-show host born August 25, 1968, best known for her show ''30 Minute Meals'' on the Creator/FoodNetwork, being one of the [[MsFanservice biggest draws]] for said network's male audience, and for her perky personality. She also hosts a TalkShow, which is syndicated by Creator/{{CBS}}.


* BigEater: Well, ''[[CaptainObvious duh]]''!

to:

%% * BigEater: Well, ''[[CaptainObvious duh]]''!''duh''!

Added DiffLines:

* KeepCirculatingTheTapes: ''$40 a Day'' stopped airing in the U.S. in the 2010s, and isn't available on DVD.

Added DiffLines:

* NiceToTheWaiter: In regards to ''$40 a Day'', she's been accused of subverting this on occasion. Some fans have noted that she leaves rather skimpy tips in some of her episodes in order to make her self-imposed "budget".

Added DiffLines:

* LethalChef:
** Her use of extra-virgin olive oil for frying. Extra-virgin oil has a low smoke point and will catch fire.
** Her use of a single cutting board for meat and vegetables, a major risk for cross-contamination.


* FullyAutomaticClipShow: Her talk show staff made one about her discussing the costumes on DancingWithTheStars, usually calling them [[FromACertainPointOfView "tiny."]]

to:

* FullyAutomaticClipShow: Her talk show staff made one about her discussing the costumes on DancingWithTheStars, ''Series/DancingWithTheStars'', usually calling them [[FromACertainPointOfView "tiny."]]


* TrademarkFavoriteFood: Her "EVOO."

to:

* TrademarkFavoriteFood: Her In case you haven't figured it out yet, she really loves her "EVOO."

Added DiffLines:

* TrademarkFavoriteFood: Her "EVOO."

Added DiffLines:

** Though to be fair, she has never claimed to be a chef, and has called herself a cook many times. As said above, doesn't stop people who don't know the difference from calling her one.


** The fact that she uses "EVOO" in nearly everything, and has taught her fans to use it in nearly everything, is another BerserkButton for actual chefs. The truth is, real chefs don't use extra virgin olive oil in anything that isn't a marinade or a salad dressing, because it is a) mostly water and thus utterly flavorless, and b) has a really low smoke point (220 degrees Farenheit). (The smoke point is the temperature at which the oil catches fire.) Rather, chefs use Virgin and Fine grade oils (and never anything lower than Fine) because they impart a flavor to the food and have a higher smoke point than Extra Virgin (Virgin is 338 degrees, while Fine is 418 degrees).

to:

** The fact that she uses "EVOO" in nearly everything, and has taught her fans to use it in nearly everything, is another BerserkButton for actual chefs. The truth is, real chefs don't use extra virgin olive oil in anything that isn't a marinade or a salad dressing, because it is a) mostly water and thus utterly flavorless, has a very mild flavor, and b) has a really low smoke point (220 degrees Farenheit). (The smoke point is the temperature at which the oil catches fire.) Rather, chefs use Virgin and Fine grade oils (and never anything lower than Fine) because they impart a flavor to the food and have a higher smoke point than Extra Virgin (Virgin is 338 degrees, while Fine is 418 degrees).


* MotorMouth: See the note about her hatedom above.

to:

* MotorMouth: See Is she ever. Also see the note about her hatedom above.


* BerserkButton: Not one of hers, but rather about her. Chefs ''really'' don't like it when people call her a chef. Because she isn't one. Also, any chef can name at least nine or ten mistakes she makes in ''every single episode'' of her shows, and the wrong lessons she's teaching novice chefs who watch her show for tips.

to:

* BerserkButton: Not one of hers, ''hers,'' but rather about her. ''about'' her. Chefs ''really'' don't like it when people call her a chef. Because she isn't one. Also, any chef can name at least nine or ten mistakes she makes in ''every single episode'' of her shows, and the wrong lessons she's teaching novice chefs who watch her show for tips.



* CatSmile: But that great big toothy grin of hers is the real thing.

to:

* CatSmile: But that great big ''great big'' toothy grin of hers is the real thing.



* GenkiGirl: Very, very much so.

to:

* GenkiGirl: Very, very much so.Girl ''owns'' this trope!


** The fact that she uses "EVOO" is nearly everything, and has taught her fans to use it in nearly everything, is another BerserkButton for actual chefs. The truth is, real chefs don't use extra virgin olive oil in anything that isn't a marinade or a salad dressing, because it is a) mostly water and thus utterly flavorless, and b) has a really low smoke point (220 degrees Farenheit). (The smoke point is the temperature at which the oil catches fire.) Rather, chefs use Virgin and Fine grade oils (and never anything lower than Fine) because they impart a flavor to the food and have a higher smoke point than Extra Virgin (Virgin is 338 degrees, while Fine is 418 degrees).

to:

** The fact that she uses "EVOO" is in nearly everything, and has taught her fans to use it in nearly everything, is another BerserkButton for actual chefs. The truth is, real chefs don't use extra virgin olive oil in anything that isn't a marinade or a salad dressing, because it is a) mostly water and thus utterly flavorless, and b) has a really low smoke point (220 degrees Farenheit). (The smoke point is the temperature at which the oil catches fire.) Rather, chefs use Virgin and Fine grade oils (and never anything lower than Fine) because they impart a flavor to the food and have a higher smoke point than Extra Virgin (Virgin is 338 degrees, while Fine is 418 degrees).

Showing 15 edit(s) of 23

Top

How well does it match the trope?

Example of:

/

Media sources:

/

Report