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The internal conflict within Warner Bros. and Chris-Craft's apathy guaranteed that one of their projects would be killed, and PTEN was the loser.

to:

The internal conflict within Warner Bros. and Chris-Craft's apathy guaranteed that one of their projects would be killed, and [[NetworkDeath PTEN was the loser.
loser]].


WarnerBros and [[Creator/{{UPN}} Chris-Craft/United Television's]] first attempt at creating a broadcast network resulted in the Prime Time Entertainment Network, or PTEN. This was an ''ad hoc'' network of independent stations that was intended to standardize the scheduling and marketing of Warner's first-run syndicated dramas. In truth, it was actually little more than a UsefulNotes/{{syndication}} package like Operation Prime Time of the 1970s and '80s, the Creator/{{Paramount}} service that was planned to launch in 1978, but was scuttled (the ''Franchise/StarTrek'' series intended for that evolved into ''Film/StarTrekTheMotionPicture''), or Creator/{{Universal}}'s ''Creator/ActionPack'', a collection of shows sold as a block to the participating stations. Warner hoped that it would eventually grow into a true network, but that was not to be.

to:

WarnerBros Creator/WarnerBros and [[Creator/{{UPN}} Chris-Craft/United Television's]] first attempt at creating a broadcast network resulted in the Prime Time Entertainment Network, or PTEN. This was an ''ad hoc'' network of independent stations that was intended to standardize the scheduling and marketing of Warner's first-run syndicated dramas. In truth, it was actually little more than a UsefulNotes/{{syndication}} package like Operation Prime Time of the 1970s and '80s, the Creator/{{Paramount}} service that was planned to launch in 1978, but was scuttled (the ''Franchise/StarTrek'' series intended for that evolved into ''Film/StarTrekTheMotionPicture''), or Creator/{{Universal}}'s ''Creator/ActionPack'', a collection of shows sold as a block to the participating stations. Warner hoped that it would eventually grow into a true network, but that was not to be.


WarnerBros and [[Creator/{{UPN}} Chris-Craft/United Television's]] first attempt at creating a broadcast network resulted in the Prime Time Entertainment Network, or PTEN. This was an ''ad hoc'' network of independent stations that was intended to standardize the scheduling and marketing of Warner's first-run syndicated dramas. In truth, it was actually little more than a {{syndication}} package like Operation Prime Time of the 1970s and '80s, the Creator/{{Paramount}} service that was planned to launch in 1978, but was scuttled (the ''Franchise/StarTrek'' series intended for that evolved into ''Film/StarTrekTheMotionPicture''), or Creator/{{Universal}}'s ''Creator/ActionPack'', a collection of shows sold as a block to the participating stations. Warner hoped that it would eventually grow into a true network, but that was not to be.

to:

WarnerBros and [[Creator/{{UPN}} Chris-Craft/United Television's]] first attempt at creating a broadcast network resulted in the Prime Time Entertainment Network, or PTEN. This was an ''ad hoc'' network of independent stations that was intended to standardize the scheduling and marketing of Warner's first-run syndicated dramas. In truth, it was actually little more than a {{syndication}} UsefulNotes/{{syndication}} package like Operation Prime Time of the 1970s and '80s, the Creator/{{Paramount}} service that was planned to launch in 1978, but was scuttled (the ''Franchise/StarTrek'' series intended for that evolved into ''Film/StarTrekTheMotionPicture''), or Creator/{{Universal}}'s ''Creator/ActionPack'', a collection of shows sold as a block to the participating stations. Warner hoped that it would eventually grow into a true network, but that was not to be.


#The participating stations generally got to choose when on their schedule the PTEN programs would air. Presumably, an interest in getting a return on their investment would lead to scheduling the programs in PrimeTime broadcast slots, but this was not always the case (in large part because close to half of its stations were already Fox affiliates), as fans of the nascent network's offerings [[ScrewedByTheNetwork would soon find out]].

to:

#The participating stations generally got to choose when on their schedule the PTEN programs would air. Presumably, an interest in getting a return on their investment would lead to scheduling the programs in PrimeTime UsefulNotes/PrimeTime broadcast slots, but this was not always the case (in large part because close to half of its stations were already Fox affiliates), as fans of the nascent network's offerings [[ScrewedByTheNetwork would soon find out]].


#The participating stations generally got to choose when on their schedule the PTEN programs would air. Presumably, an interest in getting a return on their investment would lead to scheduling the programs in PrimeTime broadcast slots, but this was not always the case, as fans of the nascent network's offerings [[ScrewedByTheNetwork would soon find out]].

to:

#The participating stations generally got to choose when on their schedule the PTEN programs would air. Presumably, an interest in getting a return on their investment would lead to scheduling the programs in PrimeTime broadcast slots, but this was not always the case, case (in large part because close to half of its stations were already Fox affiliates), as fans of the nascent network's offerings [[ScrewedByTheNetwork would soon find out]].


#A completely different division of Warner was already in the process of setting up the network which would become Creator/TheWB.

to:

#A completely different division of Warner Bros. TV was already in the process of setting up the network which would become Creator/TheWB.


#Chris-Craft, a boat maker which happened to get into television (by way of United Television/BHC Communications), decided to hitch its wagon to Paramount Pictures and, with their stations and those of Paramount [[note]]Paramount had acquired TVX Broadcast Group in 1991 -- which had gotten many of its stations from the former Taft Broadcasting -- and renamed it as the '''Paramount Stations Group'''; this later merged with the group of CBS O&Os after the Viacom-CBS merger. These stations are currently either Creator/MyNetworkTV, Creator/TheCW, or independent; ironically, only one of the original six Paramount stations, KTXA-21 in Dallas (currently an independent), is still owned by CBS[[/note]] as the nucleus, launched Creator/{{UPN}}, which ate up PTEN's prime time slots and pushed their shows into the FridayNightDeathSlot, late night or Saturday afternoons, which were among the busiest timeslots for syndicated programming in TheNineties.

to:

#Chris-Craft, a boat maker which happened to get into television (by way of United Television/BHC Communications), decided to hitch its wagon to Paramount Pictures and, with their stations and those of Paramount [[note]]Paramount had acquired TVX Broadcast Group in 1991 -- which had gotten many of its stations from the former Taft Broadcasting -- and renamed it as the '''Paramount Stations Group'''; this later merged with the group of CBS O&Os after the Viacom-CBS merger. These stations are currently either Creator/MyNetworkTV, Creator/TheCW, or independent; ironically, now, only one of the original six Paramount stations, KTXA-21 in Dallas (currently an independent), is still owned by CBS[[/note]] as the nucleus, launched Creator/{{UPN}}, which ate up PTEN's prime time slots and pushed their shows into the FridayNightDeathSlot, late night or Saturday afternoons, which were among the busiest timeslots for syndicated programming in TheNineties.


#Chris-Craft, a boat maker which happened to get into television (by way of United Television/BHC Communications), decided to hitch its wagon to Paramount Pictures and, with their stations and those of Paramount [[note]]Paramount had acquired TVX Broadcast Group in 1991 -- which had gotten many of its stations from the former Taft Broadcasting -- and renamed it as the '''Paramount Stations Group''', which later merged with the group of CBS O&Os after the Viacom-CBS merger. These stations are currently either Creator/MyNetworkTV, Creator/TheCW, or independent; ironically, only one of the original six Paramount stations, KTXA-21 in Dallas (currently an independent) is still owned by CBS[[/note]] as the nucleus, launched Creator/{{UPN}}, which ate up PTEN's prime time slots and pushed their shows into the FridayNightDeathSlot, late night or Saturday afternoons, which were among the busiest timeslots for syndicated programming in TheNineties.

to:

#Chris-Craft, a boat maker which happened to get into television (by way of United Television/BHC Communications), decided to hitch its wagon to Paramount Pictures and, with their stations and those of Paramount [[note]]Paramount had acquired TVX Broadcast Group in 1991 -- which had gotten many of its stations from the former Taft Broadcasting -- and renamed it as the '''Paramount Stations Group''', which Group'''; this later merged with the group of CBS O&Os after the Viacom-CBS merger. These stations are currently either Creator/MyNetworkTV, Creator/TheCW, or independent; ironically, only one of the original six Paramount stations, KTXA-21 in Dallas (currently an independent) independent), is still owned by CBS[[/note]] as the nucleus, launched Creator/{{UPN}}, which ate up PTEN's prime time slots and pushed their shows into the FridayNightDeathSlot, late night or Saturday afternoons, which were among the busiest timeslots for syndicated programming in TheNineties.


#Chris-Craft, a boat maker which happened to get into television (by way of United Television/BHC Communications), decided to hitch its wagon to Paramount Pictures and, with their stations and those of Paramount (who had acquired TVX Broadcast Group in 1991 [which had gotten many of its stations from the former Taft Broadcasting] and renamed it as the '''Paramount Stations Group''', which later merged with the group of CBS O&Os after the Viacom-CBS merger, and are currently either Creator/MyNetworkTV, Creator/TheCW, or independent; ironically, only one of the orginial six Paramount stations, KTXA-21 in Dallas, currently an independent, is still owned by CBS) as the nucleus, launched Creator/{{UPN}}, which ate up PTEN's prime time slots and pushed their shows into the FridayNightDeathSlot, late night or Saturday afternoons, which were among the busiest timeslots for syndicated programming in TheNineties.

to:

#Chris-Craft, a boat maker which happened to get into television (by way of United Television/BHC Communications), decided to hitch its wagon to Paramount Pictures and, with their stations and those of Paramount (who [[note]]Paramount had acquired TVX Broadcast Group in 1991 [which -- which had gotten many of its stations from the former Taft Broadcasting] Broadcasting -- and renamed it as the '''Paramount Stations Group''', which later merged with the group of CBS O&Os after the Viacom-CBS merger, and merger. These stations are currently either Creator/MyNetworkTV, Creator/TheCW, or independent; ironically, only one of the orginial original six Paramount stations, KTXA-21 in Dallas, currently Dallas (currently an independent, independent) is still owned by CBS) CBS[[/note]] as the nucleus, launched Creator/{{UPN}}, which ate up PTEN's prime time slots and pushed their shows into the FridayNightDeathSlot, late night or Saturday afternoons, which were among the busiest timeslots for syndicated programming in TheNineties.


[[caption-width-right:350:[[AcronymConfusion Explosive Entertainment!]][[note]][[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PTEN note]][[/note]]]]

to:

[[caption-width-right:350:[[AcronymConfusion Explosive Entertainment!]][[note]][[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PTEN org/wiki/Prime_Time_Entertainment_Network note]][[/note]]]]


[[caption-width-right:350:[[AcronymConfusion Explosive Entertainment!]][[note]][[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PETN note]][[/note]]]]

to:

[[caption-width-right:350:[[AcronymConfusion Explosive Entertainment!]][[note]][[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PETN org/wiki/PTEN note]][[/note]]]]



WarnerBros and [[Creator/{{UPN}} Chris-Craft/United Television's]] first attempt at creating a broadcast network resulted in the Prime Time Entertainment Network, or PTEN. This was an ''ad hoc'' network of independent stations that was intended to standardize the scheduling and marketing of Warner's first-run syndicated dramas. In truth, it was actually little more than a {{syndication}} package like Operation Prime Time of the 70s and 80s, the Creator/{{Paramount}} service that was planned to launch in 1978, but was scuttled (the ''Franchise/StarTrek'' series intended for that evolved into ''Film/StarTrekTheMotionPicture''), or Creator/{{Universal}}'s ''Creator/ActionPack'', a collection of shows sold as a block to the participating stations. Warner hoped that it would eventually grow into a true network, but that was not to be.

to:

\nWarnerBros and [[Creator/{{UPN}} Chris-Craft/United Television's]] first attempt at creating a broadcast network resulted in the Prime Time Entertainment Network, or PTEN. This was an ''ad hoc'' network of independent stations that was intended to standardize the scheduling and marketing of Warner's first-run syndicated dramas. In truth, it was actually little more than a {{syndication}} package like Operation Prime Time of the 70s 1970s and 80s, '80s, the Creator/{{Paramount}} service that was planned to launch in 1978, but was scuttled (the ''Franchise/StarTrek'' series intended for that evolved into ''Film/StarTrekTheMotionPicture''), or Creator/{{Universal}}'s ''Creator/ActionPack'', a collection of shows sold as a block to the participating stations. Warner hoped that it would eventually grow into a true network, but that was not to be.



#A completely different division of Warner was already in the process of setting up the network which would become TheWB.
#Chris-Craft, a boat maker which happened to get into television (by way of United Television/BHC Communications), decided to hitch its wagon to Creator/{{Paramount}} Pictures and, with their stations and those of Paramount (who had acquired TVX Broadcast Group in 1991 (which had gotten many of its stations from the former Taft Broadcasting) and renamed it as the '''Paramount Stations Group''', which later merged with the group of CBS O&Os after the Viacom-CBS merger, and are currently either MyNetworkTV, TheCW, or independent; ironically, only one of the orginial six Paramount stations, KTXA-21 in Dallas, currently an independent, is still owned by CBS) as the nucleus, launched Creator/{{UPN}}, which ate up PTEN's prime time slots and pushed their shows into the FridayNightDeathSlot, late night or Saturday afternoons, which were among the busiest timeslots for syndicated programming in TheNineties.

The internal conflict within Warner Bros. and Chris-Craft's apathy guaranteed one of their projects would be killed, and PTEN was the loser.

It lasted only four years (1993-1997), and in its final seasons was kept alive solely by its one surviving program: ''Series/BabylonFive''.

Other programs that were part of the PTEN {{syndication}} package were ''Series/TimeTrax'' and ''[[Series/KungFu Kung Fu: The Legend Continues]]''.

to:

#A completely different division of Warner was already in the process of setting up the network which would become TheWB.
Creator/TheWB.
#Chris-Craft, a boat maker which happened to get into television (by way of United Television/BHC Communications), decided to hitch its wagon to Creator/{{Paramount}} Paramount Pictures and, with their stations and those of Paramount (who had acquired TVX Broadcast Group in 1991 (which [which had gotten many of its stations from the former Taft Broadcasting) Broadcasting] and renamed it as the '''Paramount Stations Group''', which later merged with the group of CBS O&Os after the Viacom-CBS merger, and are currently either MyNetworkTV, TheCW, Creator/MyNetworkTV, Creator/TheCW, or independent; ironically, only one of the orginial six Paramount stations, KTXA-21 in Dallas, currently an independent, is still owned by CBS) as the nucleus, launched Creator/{{UPN}}, which ate up PTEN's prime time slots and pushed their shows into the FridayNightDeathSlot, late night or Saturday afternoons, which were among the busiest timeslots for syndicated programming in TheNineties.

The internal conflict within Warner Bros. and Chris-Craft's apathy guaranteed that one of their projects would be killed, and PTEN was the loser.

It PTEN lasted only four years (1993-1997), and in its final seasons was kept alive solely by its one surviving program: ''Series/BabylonFive''.

Other programs that were part of the PTEN {{syndication}} syndication package were ''Series/TimeTrax'' and ''[[Series/KungFu Kung Fu: The Legend Continues]]''.

Added DiffLines:

[[quoteright:350:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/PTEN_logo.jpg]]
[[caption-width-right:350:[[AcronymConfusion Explosive Entertainment!]][[note]][[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PETN note]][[/note]]]]

WarnerBros and [[Creator/{{UPN}} Chris-Craft/United Television's]] first attempt at creating a broadcast network resulted in the Prime Time Entertainment Network, or PTEN. This was an ''ad hoc'' network of independent stations that was intended to standardize the scheduling and marketing of Warner's first-run syndicated dramas. In truth, it was actually little more than a {{syndication}} package like Operation Prime Time of the 70s and 80s, the Creator/{{Paramount}} service that was planned to launch in 1978, but was scuttled (the ''Franchise/StarTrek'' series intended for that evolved into ''Film/StarTrekTheMotionPicture''), or Creator/{{Universal}}'s ''Creator/ActionPack'', a collection of shows sold as a block to the participating stations. Warner hoped that it would eventually grow into a true network, but that was not to be.

PTEN had three strikes against it going in, which all but scuttled the intent to turn it into a real network:
#The participating stations generally got to choose when on their schedule the PTEN programs would air. Presumably, an interest in getting a return on their investment would lead to scheduling the programs in PrimeTime broadcast slots, but this was not always the case, as fans of the nascent network's offerings [[ScrewedByTheNetwork would soon find out]].
#A completely different division of Warner was already in the process of setting up the network which would become TheWB.
#Chris-Craft, a boat maker which happened to get into television (by way of United Television/BHC Communications), decided to hitch its wagon to Creator/{{Paramount}} Pictures and, with their stations and those of Paramount (who had acquired TVX Broadcast Group in 1991 (which had gotten many of its stations from the former Taft Broadcasting) and renamed it as the '''Paramount Stations Group''', which later merged with the group of CBS O&Os after the Viacom-CBS merger, and are currently either MyNetworkTV, TheCW, or independent; ironically, only one of the orginial six Paramount stations, KTXA-21 in Dallas, currently an independent, is still owned by CBS) as the nucleus, launched Creator/{{UPN}}, which ate up PTEN's prime time slots and pushed their shows into the FridayNightDeathSlot, late night or Saturday afternoons, which were among the busiest timeslots for syndicated programming in TheNineties.

The internal conflict within Warner Bros. and Chris-Craft's apathy guaranteed one of their projects would be killed, and PTEN was the loser.

It lasted only four years (1993-1997), and in its final seasons was kept alive solely by its one surviving program: ''Series/BabylonFive''.

Other programs that were part of the PTEN {{syndication}} package were ''Series/TimeTrax'' and ''[[Series/KungFu Kung Fu: The Legend Continues]]''.
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