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* BusmansHoliday: Somewhat of a RunningGag, Alleyn's vacations [[PulledFromYourDayOff are usually cut short by yet another dead body]] or he ends up solving a crime on his vacations; in ''Spinsters In Jeopardy'', it comes down to a working holiday, complete with his wife and son in tow. The whole problem is even [[LampshadeHanging lampshaded]] by Alleyn in the very first novel, ''A Man Lay Dead'', where he mentions not playing the "Murder" (Clue) party game, not being overly fond of a Busman's holiday.

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* BusmansHoliday: Somewhat of a RunningGag, Alleyn's RunningGag for Alleyn throughout the series his vacations [[PulledFromYourDayOff are usually cut short by yet another dead body]] or he ends up solving a crime on his vacations; in ''Spinsters In Jeopardy'', it comes down to a working holiday, complete with his wife and son in tow. The whole problem is even [[LampshadeHanging lampshaded]] by Alleyn in the very ''very first novel, ''A novel'', '''A Man Lay Dead'', Dead''', where he mentions not playing the "Murder" (Clue) party game, not being overly fond of "not frightfully keen on a Busman's holiday.Holidays".


She was considered one of the Big Four mystery writers, along with Creator/AgathaChristie, Creator/DorothyLSayers, and Margery Allingham. She had cordial relations with Christie and Allingham but loathed Sayers, and was one of the most vehement proponents of the cruel rumour that Sayers was a pathetic, dried-up old biddy who created Harriet Vane as an AuthorAvatar because she had fallen in love with Literature/LordPeterWimsey. Strangely, Marsh herself created a large number of Author Avatars, most of whom managed to fall in love by the last chapter, but hers were never quite as memorable as Vane.

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She was considered one of the Big Four mystery writers, along with Creator/AgathaChristie, Creator/DorothyLSayers, and Margery Allingham. She had cordial relations with Christie and Allingham but loathed Sayers, and was one of the most vehement proponents of the cruel rumour that Sayers was a pathetic, dried-up old biddy who created Harriet Vane as an AuthorAvatar because she had fallen in love with Literature/LordPeterWimsey. Strangely, Marsh herself created a large number of Author Avatars, most of whom managed to fall in love by the last chapter, but hers were never quite as memorable as Vane.
chapter.

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[[quoteright:350:https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/ngaio_marsh.jpg]]

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* BerserkButton: In ''Vintage Murder'', it's really not a good idea to call Doctor Rangi Te Pokiha a Māori a liar. Or use the N-word to his face.


* CollapsedMidSpeech: In ''The Nursing Home Murder'', an ailing and unpopular Prime Minister collapses while speaking in the House of Commons. He's sent to a private hospital for an emergency appendectomy, but doesn't survive the procedure.

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* CollapsedMidSpeech: In ''The Nursing Home Murder'', an ailing and unpopular Prime Minister Home Secretary collapses while speaking in the House of Commons. He's sent to a private hospital for an emergency appendectomy, but doesn't survive the procedure.


She never married or had children, and her extraordinary reticence about her private life has fuelled rumours that she was a lesbian. She may have instead been {{asexual}}.

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She never married or had children, and her extraordinary reticence about her private life has fuelled rumours that she was a lesbian. She may have instead been {{asexual}}.
lesbian.


* RecurringCharacter: the only character who shows up in every book is Alleyn. All other characters are recurring, but some recur more often than others, the most likely ones being Alleyn's right-hand man, DI [[MeaningfulName Brer Fox]], DSgt Bailey and Alleyn's eventual wife, Agatha Troy.

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* RecurringCharacter: the only character who shows up in every book is Alleyn. All other characters are recurring, but some recur more often than others, the most likely ones being Alleyn's right-hand man, DI [[MeaningfulName Brer Fox]], DSgt [=DSgt=] Bailey and Alleyn's eventual wife, Agatha Troy.


* CampGay: A few examples turn up in her novels. Her earlier portrayal of gay characters, for example Dennis in ''Singing in the Shrouds'' (1959) and Claude and Lionel in ''Death in Ecstasy'' (1936) are treated as distasteful at best. There is some improvement over the years; the household staff of "oncers" in ''Tied Up in Tinsel'' (1972) includes a convicted homosexual who attacked a cruel jailer, and Alleyn treats him sympathetically. Marsh's most positive portrayal of this trope is probably Ned Hanley from ''Literature/PhotoFinish'' (1980), who is shown as dependable and trustworthy despite other characters putting him down at every opportunity. He does make a subtle move on Alleyn, though.

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* CampGay: A few examples turn up in her novels. Her earlier portrayal Earlier examples of gay characters, this trope - for example Dennis in ''Singing in the Shrouds'' (1959) and example, Claude and Lionel in ''Death in Ecstasy'' (1936) and Dennis in ''Singing in the Shrouds'' (1959) - are treated as distasteful at best. best, and both of these novels [[ValuesDissonance come across as homophobic]]. There is some improvement over the years; later improvement; the household staff of "oncers" in ''Tied Up in Tinsel'' (1972) includes a convicted homosexual who attacked a cruel jailer, and Alleyn treats him sympathetically. Marsh's The most positive portrayal of this trope is probably Ned Hanley from ''Literature/PhotoFinish'' (1980), who is shown as dependable and trustworthy despite other characters putting him down at every opportunity. He does make a subtle move on Alleyn, though.


** Isabella Sommita in ''Photo Finish'' is based on Maria Callas, while Marco is based on the paparazzo Ron Galella.

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** Isabella Sommita in ''Photo Finish'' ''Literature/PhotoFinish'' is based on Maria Callas, while Marco Strix is based on the paparazzo Ron Galella.


* CampGay: Ned Hanley in ''Literature/PhotoFinish'' (1980), who is shown as dependable and trustworthy despite other characters putting him down at every opportunity. He does make a subtle move on Alleyn, though. Other gay characters, for example Dennis in ''Singing in the Shrouds'' (1959) and Claude and Lionel in ''Death in Ecstasy'' (1936) are treated as distasteful at best. There is some improvement over the years; the household staff of "oncers" in ''Tied Up in Tinsel'' (1972) includes a convicted homosexual who attacked a cruel jailer, and Alleyn treats him sympathetically.

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* CampGay: Ned Hanley A few examples turn up in ''Literature/PhotoFinish'' (1980), who is shown as dependable and trustworthy despite other characters putting him down at every opportunity. He does make a subtle move on Alleyn, though. Other her novels. Her earlier portrayal of gay characters, for example Dennis in ''Singing in the Shrouds'' (1959) and Claude and Lionel in ''Death in Ecstasy'' (1936) are treated as distasteful at best. There is some improvement over the years; the household staff of "oncers" in ''Tied Up in Tinsel'' (1972) includes a convicted homosexual who attacked a cruel jailer, and Alleyn treats him sympathetically. Marsh's most positive portrayal of this trope is probably Ned Hanley from ''Literature/PhotoFinish'' (1980), who is shown as dependable and trustworthy despite other characters putting him down at every opportunity. He does make a subtle move on Alleyn, though.


* ''Literature/PhotoFinish'' (1980)



!!Marsh's other novels provide examples of:

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!!Marsh's other novels provide examples of:



* CampGay: Ned Hanley in ''Photo Finish'' (1980), who is shown as dependable and trustworthy despite other characters putting him down at every opportunity. He does make a subtle move on Alleyn, though. Other gay characters, for example Dennis in ''Singing in the Shrouds'' (1959) and Claude and Lionel in ''Death in Ecstasy'' (1936) are treated as distasteful at best. There is some improvement over the years; the household staff of "oncers" in ''Tied Up in Tinsel'' (1972) includes a convicted homosexual who attacked a cruel jailer, and Alleyn treats him sympathetically.

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* CampGay: Ned Hanley in ''Photo Finish'' ''Literature/PhotoFinish'' (1980), who is shown as dependable and trustworthy despite other characters putting him down at every opportunity. He does make a subtle move on Alleyn, though. Other gay characters, for example Dennis in ''Singing in the Shrouds'' (1959) and Claude and Lionel in ''Death in Ecstasy'' (1936) are treated as distasteful at best. There is some improvement over the years; the household staff of "oncers" in ''Tied Up in Tinsel'' (1972) includes a convicted homosexual who attacked a cruel jailer, and Alleyn treats him sympathetically.

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* NiceHat: In the TV adaption, Alleyn usually wears a black Homburg hat with his "serious" (=work) suit, even in the midst of summer.

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* DrivesLikeCrazy: Agatha Troy tends to drive [[TheAllegedCar her van]] through the countryside in a manner that most of her (well-bred) passengers ask her if it would be all right to take over driving. Her TV incarnation, played by Belinda Lang is arguably worse, driving said van worth of a session of the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moose_test infamous Moose Evasion Test]]. Curiously, the only one not bothered by her driving is Alleyn himself.


* HaveAGayOldTime: In ''Scent of Death'' (1960), the flamboyant costume designer and interior decorator Bertie Saracen is described with the words "Everthing about him was gay." Being involved with the theatre, it is possible that Ms Marsh knew of the alternative meanings of the word.

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* HaveAGayOldTime: In ''Scent of Death'' ''False Scent'' (1960), the flamboyant costume designer and interior decorator Bertie Saracen is described with the words "Everthing about him was gay." Being involved with the theatre, it is possible that Ms Marsh knew of the alternative meanings of the word.

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* HaveAGayOldTime: In ''Scent of Death'' (1960), the flamboyant costume designer and interior decorator Bertie Saracen is described with the words "Everthing about him was gay." Being involved with the theatre, it is possible that Ms Marsh knew of the alternative meanings of the word.

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