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* IntelligenceEqualsIsolation: In the story "Judgment Day", a scientific genius has discovered a principle that will make weapons on the scale of A-bombs (which hadn't been fully invented yet when the story was written) possible. Most of the story is a flashback to his unhappy life of being unpopular and bullied and lonely. He decides to publish his discovery, expecting it to lead to humanity destroying itself.

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* IntelligenceEqualsIsolation: In the story "Judgment Day", a scientific genius has discovered a principle that will make weapons on the scale of A-bombs (which hadn't been fully invented yet when the story was written) possible. Most of the story is a flashback to his unhappy life of being unpopular and bullied and lonely. lonely, with him trying to argue himself into not publishing despite this out of what remains of his conscience. The straw that breaks the camel's back is returning to his home to find [[TeensAreMonsters local teens]] have vandalized his home in an over-the-top prank. He decides to publish his discovery, expecting it to lead to humanity destroying itself.itself.
-->That decided me. There is one way I can be happy during my remaining years, and that is by the knowledge that all these bastards will get theirs someday. I hate them. I hate them. I hate everybody. I want to kill mankind. I'd kill them by slow torture if I could. If I can't, blowing up the earth will do. I shall write my report.

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* UpliftedAnimal: "Johnny Black", a black bear given human-level intelligence by an experimental process that increased the efficiency of his synapses, was the protagonist of a series of short stories beginning with "The Command".


* ''Literature/ThePusadianSeries''



* ''Literature/ThePusadianSeries''

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* ''Literature/ThePusadianSeries''

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[[quoteright:204:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/decampl.jpg]]


L. Sprague de Camp (1907 2000) was an American author. His notable works include the time-travel novel ''Literature/LestDarknessFall'' and the ''Literature/HaroldShea'' series. He was a major contributor to the ConanTheBarbarian series after it OutlivedItsCreator.

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L. Sprague de Camp (1907 2000) was an American author. His notable works include the time-travel novel ''Literature/LestDarknessFall'' and the ''Literature/HaroldShea'' series. He was a major contributor to the ConanTheBarbarian Literature/ConanTheBarbarian series after it OutlivedItsCreator.

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* MermaidProblem: In a folk tale recounted in ''The Unbeheaded King'', a mermaid and a human attempt to have sex. Since the mermaid is dolphin-based, finding the opening isn't a problem. However, almost drowning is.

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* JustLikeRobinHood: In ''The Fallible Fiend'', the leader of a bandit gang announces that they rob from the rich and give to the poor and since they themselves are the poorest people they can find...


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* TheNudifier: In the short story "The Exalted", the MadScientist prankster builds a device that nullifies friction and makes woven fabrics crumble to threads.


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* OurNudityIsDifferent: ''The Wheels of If'' has a scene on an alternate Earth where belly buttons are considered obscene...but nothing else is, resulting in BarelyThereSwimwear of an unusual sort. The protagonist (who is from our Earth) doesn't realize this at first, he just notices that everyone seems to be walking around what he considers to be nude, so he takes his clothes off to fit in ... and is promptly arrested for "Shameful Outputting" of his navel (the person explaining exactly what he's being charged with can barely bring himself to say it).
* PrestigePeril: In the Reluctant King series, the kingdom of Xylar chooses its next king by throwing the head of the previous king into a crowd -- the catcher gets the throne. The catch is that in five years, the process is repeated... which is why Jorian, who had no idea about all this, is very much the titular Reluctant King, and spends the trilogy running away from Xylarians who want to drag him back so they can perform the ceremony.
* SchizoTech: ''Divide and Rule'' features trains pulled by elephants, knights with armor made of chrome steel and plexiglass, cavalry battles with radio correspondents, and castles that use canned food to outlast sieges, among many other things. This is because Earth has been conquered by aliens who give humans a fair degree of autonomy, but don't allow them certain technologies, such as explosives and motor vehicles.


* ''ConanTheBarbarian'' series

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* ''ConanTheBarbarian'' ''Franchise/ConanTheBarbarian'' series



* ''Literature/ViagensInterplanetarias'' series



* ArrangedMarriage: The Krishnans in the ''Viagens Interplanetarias'' series practice arranged marriage, a fact that upsets the occasional human that falls in love with one. However, in nearly all cases the Krishnans themselves are totally unbothered by arranged marriage, as they consider marriage to be an important lifetime social and financial arrangement too important to be dictated by something as fickle and ephemeral as love. Several characters even express horror of the very idea of marrying for love.
* BeePeople: ''Rogue Queen'', set in the ''Viagens Interplanetarias'' universe, features the Ormazdians, a race of medieval-age humanoid monotreme aliens who have a fairly scientifically accurate hive society with egg-laying queens, sterile female workers, and male drones who only live to fertilize the queen. There is also a subspecies that has both worker and soldier females. The Ormazdians' sexual development is triggered by meat proteins, so the queens explicitly forbid workers from eating meat, claiming that it will poison them. Naturally humans arrive on Ormazd, help some workers they've befriended discover the truth, and destroy the entire Ormazdian societal structure. This is portrayed as ultimately for the best, as the hive society causes stagnation. The Ormazdians should not be confused with the Krishnans, ''another'' race of medieval-age humanoid monotremes from the ''Viagens Interplanetarias'' universe who do not live in a hive structure.
* BodyPaint: In ''Viagens Interplanetarias'' series, one of the humanoid cultures on planet Krishna lives in such a hot climate that the people forgo clothing altogether, and only wear jewelery and body paint.
* BoldlyComing: In ''The Hostage of Zir'', one of the characters comments that Literature/TheBible forbids fornication, sex with a human you're not married to, and bestiality, sex with a dumb animal. But it says not a word about fun with a GreenSkinnedSpaceBabe on the planet Zarathustra.



* ExoticEquipment: The ''Viagens Interplanetarias'' series features a race of humanoid monotremes from the planet Krishna that, while anatomically similar to (but not interfertile with) humans, take considerably less time to climax. For this reason female Krishnans tend to seek out male humans for liaisons, while female humans try to avoid male Krishnans. It's also worth noting that, while humans last longer, male Krishnans were capable of copulating much more often (15-20 times per night).



* GreenSkinnedSpaceBabe: In the ''Viagens Interplanetarias'' cycle one of the prominent planets, Krishna, is populated by a humanoid species that happens to be sexually compatible with humans (though matings won't result in offspring). Some of them wear nothing but jewellery and body paint. Needless to say, one of the human characters gets to seduce a local princess. (The Krishnans are actually depicted as green-skinned humanoids in the GURPS adaptation of the setting as a tabletop game.) De Camp knew exactly how unlikely this would be, but wanted to write swashbuckling, two-fisted adventure stories InSpace, and worked very hard to come up with a setting that would let him get away with it. The biological difficulties are frequently lampshaded, and provide a fair amount of the comedy in the series.



* PlanetaryRomance: The ''Viagens Interplanetarias'' series is an attempt to do a semi-Hard SF version of the genre.



* TyopOnTheCover: One edition of ''Rogue Queen'' had errors in both the title and the author's name, becoming ''Rouge Queen'' by L. Spraque de Camp.


He received lifetime achievement awards from the World Science Fiction Society (which runs the HugoAward), the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (which run the UsefulNotes/NebulaAward), and the organisers of the Sidewise Award for Alternate History.

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He received lifetime achievement awards from the World Science Fiction Society (which runs the HugoAward), UsefulNotes/HugoAward), the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (which run the UsefulNotes/NebulaAward), and the organisers of the Sidewise Award for Alternate History.



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He received lifetime achievement awards from the World Science Fiction Society (which runs the HugoAward), the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (which run the NebulaAward), and the organisers of the Sidewise Award for Alternate History.

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He received lifetime achievement awards from the World Science Fiction Society (which runs the HugoAward), the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (which run the NebulaAward), UsefulNotes/NebulaAward), and the organisers of the Sidewise Award for Alternate History.

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* DumbDinos: In "A Gun for Dinosaur", the dinosaurs' stupidity makes hunting them difficult due to the small size of their brains, preventing easy headshots. Because they have no memory, though, it's easy to escape their attention by hiding - they'll simply forget about you.


He was a friend of Creator/IsaacAsimov, and Geoffrey Avalon, one of the characters in Asimov's Black Widowers series, is modelled on him.

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He was a friend of Creator/IsaacAsimov, and Geoffrey Avalon, one of the characters in Asimov's Black Widowers Literature/BlackWidowers series, is modelled on him.


* AintNoRule: In the short story "Nothing in the Rules", one team at a girls' swimming competition contains a mermaid, who of course wins everything. In response to the opposition's outrage, the team coach points out that the rules only specify that all entrants must be female; nothing is said about species. The officials are reluctantly forced to admit that he's right. Whereupon the opposing coach visits the city zoo and borrows a female seal, who (properly incentivized with a bucket of fish) outswims the mermaid. To avoid disqualification for not using the proper swimming form, the mermaid only competes in the freestyle events.


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* AnimalAthleteLoophole: In the short story "Nothing in the Rules", one team at a girls' swimming competition contains a mermaid, who wins every race she enters. (To avoid disqualification for not using the proper swimming form, the mermaid only competes in the freestyle events.) In response to the opposition's outrage, the team coach points out that the rules only specify that all entrants must be female; nothing is said about species. The officials are reluctantly forced to admit that he's right. Whereupon the opposing coach visits the city zoo and borrows a female seal, who (properly incentivized with a bucket of fish) outswims the mermaid.

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