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Julio Cortázar (August 26, 1914-February 12, 1984) is an Argentinian writer, famous for being one of the founders of the Latin American Boom. Actually, though he was from Argentina, he spent most of his time outside the country, first because his family lived in Europe (he was born in a Belgium embassy during the [[WorldWarI German occupation]]) and later in a self-imposed exile in France because of his dislike of the Peronís administration. He became a supporter of leftism (including the Sandinista revolution in Nicaragua) and critic of the human right violations in Latin America. He died in 1984 of leukemia.

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Julio Cortázar (August 26, 1914-February 12, 1984) is an Argentinian writer, famous for being one of the founders of the Latin American Boom. Actually, though he was from Argentina, he spent most of his time outside the country, first because his family lived in Europe (he was born in a Belgium embassy during the [[WorldWarI [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarI German occupation]]) and later in a self-imposed exile in France because of his dislike of the Peronís administration. He became a supporter of leftism (including the Sandinista revolution in Nicaragua) and critic of the human right violations in Latin America. He died in 1984 of leukemia.


Julio Cortázar (1914-1984) is an Argentinian writer, famous for being one of the founders of the Latin American Boom. Actually, though he was from Argentina, he spent most of his time outside the country, first because his family lived in Europe (he was born in a Belgium embassy during the [[WorldWarI German occupation]]) and later in a self-imposed exile in France because of his dislike of the Peronís administration. He became a supporter of leftism (including the Sandinista revolution in Nicaragua) and critic of the human right violations in Latin America. He died in 1984 of leukemia.

to:

Julio Cortázar (1914-1984) (August 26, 1914-February 12, 1984) is an Argentinian writer, famous for being one of the founders of the Latin American Boom. Actually, though he was from Argentina, he spent most of his time outside the country, first because his family lived in Europe (he was born in a Belgium embassy during the [[WorldWarI German occupation]]) and later in a self-imposed exile in France because of his dislike of the Peronís administration. He became a supporter of leftism (including the Sandinista revolution in Nicaragua) and critic of the human right violations in Latin America. He died in 1984 of leukemia.


Some of his writings (particularly his short stories) have influenced movies, like ''Weekend'' of Jean-Luc Godard or ''BlowUp'' of Michelangelo Antonioni.

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Some of his writings (particularly his short stories) have influenced movies, like ''Weekend'' of Jean-Luc Godard or ''BlowUp'' ''Film/BlowUp'' of Michelangelo Antonioni.


* OlderThanTheyLook: The photo at the top of this page was taken in 1967. Yes, he was 52-53 years old at the time.

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* OlderThanTheyLook: The photo picture at the top of this page was taken in 1967. Yes, he was 52-53 years old at the time.

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* OlderThanTheyLook: The photo at the top of this page was taken in 1967. Yes, he was 52-53 years old at the time.


* ClosedCircle: "South Highway" uses a long traffic jam... a '''very''' long traffic jam.

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* ClosedCircle: "South Highway" uses a long traffic jam... a '''very''' long traffic jam. ''The Winners'' uses a ship in the sea.


His work is amply revered by the Latin American critics and writers, full of {{Mind Screw}}s around every corner, modernism worthy of Creator/JamesJoyce, wordplay, tracts of stream of consciousness everywhere and bend or just break any convention of literature itself. Some of his most famous works are ''Rayuela'' (''{{Hopscotch}}'', 1963), ''62, modelo para armar'' (''62: A Model Kit'', 1968), ''Bestiario'' (1951) and ''Final del Juego'' (1956).

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His work is amply revered by the Latin American critics and writers, full of {{Mind Screw}}s around every corner, modernism worthy of Creator/JamesJoyce, wordplay, tracts of stream of consciousness everywhere and bend or just break any convention of literature itself. Some of his most famous works are ''Rayuela'' (''{{Hopscotch}}'', (''Literature/{{Hopscotch}}'', 1963), ''62, modelo para armar'' (''62: A Model Kit'', 1968), ''Bestiario'' (1951) and ''Final del Juego'' (1956).



!!Tropes about him and his work[[note]]except ''{{Hopscotch}}'', which has its own page[[/note]]:

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!!Tropes about him and his work[[note]]except ''{{Hopscotch}}'', ''Hopscotch'', which has its own page[[/note]]:



* SpiritualSuccessor: ''62: A Model Kit'' was born as an extension of an idea Cortázar had when writing the chapter 62 of ''{{Hopscotch}}'' (hence the title).

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* SpiritualSuccessor: ''62: A Model Kit'' was born as an extension of an idea Cortázar had when writing the chapter 62 of ''{{Hopscotch}}'' ''Literature/{{Hopscotch}}'' (hence the title).


->-- '''Julio Cortázar''', ''Hopscotch''

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->-- -->-- '''Julio Cortázar''', ''Hopscotch''



!!Tropes about him and his work[[note]]:except ''{{Hopscotch}}'', which has its own page[[/note]]:

to:

!!Tropes about him and his work[[note]]:except work[[note]]except ''{{Hopscotch}}'', which has its own page[[/note]]:

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[[quoteright:239:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/Julio_Cortazar_foto_Sara_Facio-780711_3436.jpg]]
[[caption-width-right:239:ďI realized that searching was my symbol, the emblem of those who go out at night with nothing in mind, the motives of a destroyer of compasses.Ē ]]
->''"But what is memory if not the language of feeling, a dictionary of faces and days and smells which repeat themselves like the verbs and adjectives in a speech, sneaking in behind the thing itself,into the pure present, making us sad or teaching us vicariously.."''
->-- '''Julio Cortázar''', ''Hopscotch''

Julio Cortázar (1914-1984) is an Argentinian writer, famous for being one of the founders of the Latin American Boom. Actually, though he was from Argentina, he spent most of his time outside the country, first because his family lived in Europe (he was born in a Belgium embassy during the [[WorldWarI German occupation]]) and later in a self-imposed exile in France because of his dislike of the Peronís administration. He became a supporter of leftism (including the Sandinista revolution in Nicaragua) and critic of the human right violations in Latin America. He died in 1984 of leukemia.

His work is amply revered by the Latin American critics and writers, full of {{Mind Screw}}s around every corner, modernism worthy of Creator/JamesJoyce, wordplay, tracts of stream of consciousness everywhere and bend or just break any convention of literature itself. Some of his most famous works are ''Rayuela'' (''{{Hopscotch}}'', 1963), ''62, modelo para armar'' (''62: A Model Kit'', 1968), ''Bestiario'' (1951) and ''Final del Juego'' (1956).

Some of his writings (particularly his short stories) have influenced movies, like ''Weekend'' of Jean-Luc Godard or ''BlowUp'' of Michelangelo Antonioni.
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!!Tropes about him and his work[[note]]:except ''{{Hopscotch}}'', which has its own page[[/note]]:

* AllJustADream: Played with in [[spoiler:"The Night Face Up".]]
* AuthorAppeal: France and jazz appear in a lot of stories.
* BilingualBonus: Present in all his writings.
* BuryYourGays: [[spoiler:Hélène in ''62: A Model Kit'']]
* ClosedCircle: "South Highway" uses a long traffic jam... a '''very''' long traffic jam.
* CloudCuckooLander: A lot of characters in a lot of works. Arguably, Cortázar himself.
* ContemplateOurNavels
* DownerEnding
* DramaticSlip: One of the drabbles in "Unusual Occupations" (from the book ''Cronopios and Famas'').
* GrandTheftMe: [[spoiler:"Axolotl"]].
* GratuitousEnglish
* GratuitousFrench
* HauntedHouse: "House Taken Over"... possibly.
* HumanSacrifice: [[spoiler:ďThe Night Face UpĒ.]]
* IncompatibleOrientation: A key plot point in [[spoiler:''62: A Model Kit'']] is this dynamic between Juan and Hélène. [[MindScrew Maybe]].
* LosingYourHead: One of the drabbles in "Unstable Stuff" (from the book ''Cronopios and Famas'').
* MagicRealism
* MaintainTheLie: In "The Health of the Sick", to not give a woman a shock, her family has to pretend that her son is still alive.
* {{Mayincatec}}: Curiously averted in "The Night Face Up". You donít hear about the Olmecs in your average short story.
* MindScrew
* NoNameGiven: The characters in "South Highway" are only referred by the cars they drive.
* NothingIsScarier: Whatever the presence in "House Taken Over" is, it's never described, and that is very, very unsettling.
* OldShame: A book of sonnets under the pseudonym Julio Denis.
* PerfectlyCromulentWord: 'Cronopio' is the most famous word invented by Cortázar. Supposedly it refers to someone who is naive and idealistic, disorganized, unconventional and sensitive (he even refers to them as 'creatures').
* PunBasedTitle: ''Around the Day in Eighty Worlds'', ''A Manual for Manuel'', etc. They work better on Spanish, obviously.
* PungeonMaster: Cortázar himself.
* RiddleForTheAges: Who or what occupied the house in "House Taken Over"?
* SchrodingersButterfly: Mercilessly used in "The Night Face Up".
* SmokingIsCool: Cortázar always had a cigarette at hand.
* SpiritualSuccessor: ''62: A Model Kit'' was born as an extension of an idea Cortázar had when writing the chapter 62 of ''{{Hopscotch}}'' (hence the title).
* StreamOfConsciousness
* SwitchingPOV: "Axolotl" does in smoothly right in the middle; "Miss Cora", on the other hand, does it every 100-200 words.
* VerbalTic: Cronopios sure like to say 'cronopio' a lot.
* WordSaladTitle
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