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There are two creators going by the name David Mitchell in this Wiki:

to:

There are two three creators going by the name David Mitchell in this Wiki:




to:

* The American voice actor Creator/DaveBMitchell.


For the actor and comedian David Mitchell, go [[Actor/DavidMitchell here]].

For the novellist David Mitchell, go [[Author/DavidMitchell here]].

to:

For There are two creators going by the name David Mitchell in this Wiki:

* The English
actor and comedian [[Creator/DavidMitchellActor David Mitchell, go [[Actor/DavidMitchell here]].

For the novellist
James Stuart Mitchell]].
* The English novelist [[Creator/DavidMitchellAuthor
David Mitchell, go [[Author/DavidMitchell here]].Stephen Mitchell]].

If an internal link led you here, please change it to point to the proper article.
----


[[quoteright:350:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/david_mitchell_by_kubik_3.JPG]]
[[caption-width-right:350:some caption text]]

David Stephen Mitchell (born 12 January 1969) is an English novelist. Best known for his centuries-spanning epic, ''Cloud Atlas''. Mitchell has written the following books:

[[index]]
* ''Literature/{{Ghostwritten}}'' (1999)
* ''Number9Dream'' (2001)
* ''Literature/CloudAtlas'' (2004)
* ''Black Swan Green'' (2006)
* ''Literature/TheThousandAutumnsOfJacobDeZoet'' (2010)
* ''Literature/TheBoneClocks'' (2014)
* ''Literature/SladeHouse'' (2015)
[[/index]]

His work can get rather complicated due its interconnected narratives.

Not the same as the David Mitchell on the ''Series/{{ThatMitchellAndWebbLook}}''.

----
!!Tropes found in his works include:

* ContinuityNod: David Mitchellís books are noted for their interconnectivity. This is true within single stories (the wondering soul in one of ''Literature/{{Ghostwritten}}''ís narratives, whose travels take it full-circle); within single novels (''Ghostwritten'' and ''Literature/CloudAtlas'' which are both made up of several independent but connected stories), and between novels (and other works). For example, a character from the Frobisher narrative in ''Cloud Atlas'' features prominently in ''Black Swan Green''. A minor character from Marco's narrative in ''Ghostwritten'' starts his story by waking up to a woman whose birthmark marks her as an iteration of the 'soul' that links all of the narratives in ''Cloud Atlas''. The list goes on and on. Even in Mitchell's latest book, ''Literature/TheThousandAutumnsOfJacobDeZoet'', which was seen as a departure from his previous meta/post-modernist fiction into fairly 'straight' historical drama, there is at least one very subtle connection to his earlier book ''Number9Dream'': the minor character Satsuki Miyake comes from Yakushima, hinting that she is the ancestor of Eiji Miyake, protagonist of the earlier work, who also hails from the tiny island. Insofar as Mitchell is writing about the 'real world', past or contemporary, this Verse is quite close to our own. However, Mitchell is also notable for writing science fiction elements into his books. If, as seems to be the case, all Mitchell's works are taking place in the same Verse, we are left to try and reconcile the end of ''Ghostwritten'' (which implies [[spoiler: the self-aware super-computer created by the nice Irish scientist has decided to annihilate mankind]]) with the future-set episodes of ''Cloud Atlas'' (in the first instance [[spoiler: a [[Film/SoylentGreen Soylent-Green]]-referencing consumerist dystopia; in the second instance a far-future-set 'last days of humanity']]). The possibilities are fascinating...
** ''The Bone Clocks'' goes even further and connects almost all of his previous novels and fleshes out the entire multiverse. In particular, ''The Thousand Autumns of Jacob De Zoet'' is directly connected [[spoiler: with Dr. Marinus revealed as an ''Main/EternalHero'' and Enomoto's immortality cult as legitimate magic]]. The future setting of ''Cloud Atlas'' and some background on the [[spoiler: Prescients]] are also tied into it.
* DoorStopper: ''TheBoneClocks}}'' US hardcover clocks around 624 pages and''Cloud Atlas'' stands for 509 pages.
* RippedFromTheHeadlines: In Literature/{{Ghostwritten}}, the metro sarin attack is heavily based on the real life terrorist attack in Tokyo, 1995.
* TheVerse: David Mitchell's books are noted for their interconnectivity. This is true within single stories (the wondering soul in one of ''Literature/{{Ghostwritten}}''ís narratives, whose travels take it full-circle); within single novels (''Ghostwritten'' and ''Literature/CloudAtlas'' which are both made up of several independent but connected stories), and between novels (and other works). For example, a character from the Frobisher narrative in ''Cloud Atlas'' features prominently in ''Black Swan Green''. A minor character from Marco's narrative in ''Ghostwritten'' starts his story by waking up to a woman whose birthmark marks her as an iteration of the 'soul' that links all of the narratives in ''Cloud Atlas''. The list goes on and on. Even in Mitchell's latest book, ''Literature/TheThousandAutumnsOfJacobDeZoet'', which was seen as a departure from his previous meta/post-modernist fiction into fairly 'straight' historical drama, there is at least one very subtle connection to his earlier book ''Number9Dream'': the minor character Satsuki Miyake comes from Yakushima, hinting that she is the ancestor of Eiji Miyake, protagonist of the earlier work, who also hails from the tiny island. Insofar as Mitchell is writing about the 'real world', past or contemporary, this Verse is quite close to our own. However, Mitchell is also notable for writing science fiction elements into his books. If, as seems to be the case, all Mitchell's works are taking place in the same Verse, we are left to try and reconcile the end of ''Ghostwritten'' (which implies [[spoiler: the self-aware super-computer created by the nice Irish scientist has decided to annihilate mankind]]) with the future-set episodes of ''Cloud Atlas'' (in the first instance [[spoiler: a [[Film/SoylentGreen Soylent-Green]]-referencing consumerist dystopia; in the second instance a far-future-set 'last days of humanity']]). The possibilities are fascinating...
** ''The Bone Clocks'' goes even further and connects almost all of his previous novels and fleshes out the entire multiverse. In particular, ''The Thousand Autumns of Jacob De Zoet'' is directly connected [[spoiler: with Dr. Marinus revealed as an ''Main/EternalHero'' and Enomoto's immortality cult as legitimate magic]]. The future setting of ''Cloud Atlas'' and some background on the [[spoiler: Prescients]] are also tied into it.

to:

[[quoteright:350:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/david_mitchell_by_kubik_3.JPG]]
[[caption-width-right:350:some caption text]]

For the actor and comedian David Stephen Mitchell (born 12 January 1969) is an English novelist. Best known for his centuries-spanning epic, ''Cloud Atlas''. Mitchell has written Mitchell, go [[Actor/DavidMitchell here]].

For
the following books:

[[index]]
* ''Literature/{{Ghostwritten}}'' (1999)
* ''Number9Dream'' (2001)
* ''Literature/CloudAtlas'' (2004)
* ''Black Swan Green'' (2006)
* ''Literature/TheThousandAutumnsOfJacobDeZoet'' (2010)
* ''Literature/TheBoneClocks'' (2014)
* ''Literature/SladeHouse'' (2015)
[[/index]]

His work can get rather complicated due its interconnected narratives.

Not the same as the
novellist David Mitchell on the ''Series/{{ThatMitchellAndWebbLook}}''.

----
!!Tropes found in his works include:

* ContinuityNod: David Mitchellís books are noted for their interconnectivity. This is true within single stories (the wondering soul in one of ''Literature/{{Ghostwritten}}''ís narratives, whose travels take it full-circle); within single novels (''Ghostwritten'' and ''Literature/CloudAtlas'' which are both made up of several independent but connected stories), and between novels (and other works). For example, a character from the Frobisher narrative in ''Cloud Atlas'' features prominently in ''Black Swan Green''. A minor character from Marco's narrative in ''Ghostwritten'' starts his story by waking up to a woman whose birthmark marks her as an iteration of the 'soul' that links all of the narratives in ''Cloud Atlas''. The list goes on and on. Even in Mitchell's latest book, ''Literature/TheThousandAutumnsOfJacobDeZoet'', which was seen as a departure from his previous meta/post-modernist fiction into fairly 'straight' historical drama, there is at least one very subtle connection to his earlier book ''Number9Dream'': the minor character Satsuki Miyake comes from Yakushima, hinting that she is the ancestor of Eiji Miyake, protagonist of the earlier work, who also hails from the tiny island. Insofar as Mitchell is writing about the 'real world', past or contemporary, this Verse is quite close to our own. However, Mitchell is also notable for writing science fiction elements into his books. If, as seems to be the case, all Mitchell's works are taking place in the same Verse, we are left to try and reconcile the end of ''Ghostwritten'' (which implies [[spoiler: the self-aware super-computer created by the nice Irish scientist has decided to annihilate mankind]]) with the future-set episodes of ''Cloud Atlas'' (in the first instance [[spoiler: a [[Film/SoylentGreen Soylent-Green]]-referencing consumerist dystopia; in the second instance a far-future-set 'last days of humanity']]). The possibilities are fascinating...
** ''The Bone Clocks'' goes even further and connects almost all of his previous novels and fleshes out the entire multiverse. In particular, ''The Thousand Autumns of Jacob De Zoet'' is directly connected [[spoiler: with Dr. Marinus revealed as an ''Main/EternalHero'' and Enomoto's immortality cult as legitimate magic]]. The future setting of ''Cloud Atlas'' and some background on the [[spoiler: Prescients]] are also tied into it.
* DoorStopper: ''TheBoneClocks}}'' US hardcover clocks around 624 pages and''Cloud Atlas'' stands for 509 pages.
* RippedFromTheHeadlines: In Literature/{{Ghostwritten}}, the metro sarin attack is heavily based on the real life terrorist attack in Tokyo, 1995.
* TheVerse: David Mitchell's books are noted for their interconnectivity. This is true within single stories (the wondering soul in one of ''Literature/{{Ghostwritten}}''ís narratives, whose travels take it full-circle); within single novels (''Ghostwritten'' and ''Literature/CloudAtlas'' which are both made up of several independent but connected stories), and between novels (and other works). For example, a character from the Frobisher narrative in ''Cloud Atlas'' features prominently in ''Black Swan Green''. A minor character from Marco's narrative in ''Ghostwritten'' starts his story by waking up to a woman whose birthmark marks her as an iteration of the 'soul' that links all of the narratives in ''Cloud Atlas''. The list goes on and on. Even in Mitchell's latest book, ''Literature/TheThousandAutumnsOfJacobDeZoet'', which was seen as a departure from his previous meta/post-modernist fiction into fairly 'straight' historical drama, there is at least one very subtle connection to his earlier book ''Number9Dream'': the minor character Satsuki Miyake comes from Yakushima, hinting that she is the ancestor of Eiji Miyake, protagonist of the earlier work, who also hails from the tiny island. Insofar as Mitchell is writing about the 'real world', past or contemporary, this Verse is quite close to our own. However, Mitchell is also notable for writing science fiction elements into his books. If, as seems to be the case, all Mitchell's works are taking place in the same Verse, we are left to try and reconcile the end of ''Ghostwritten'' (which implies [[spoiler: the self-aware super-computer created by the nice Irish scientist has decided to annihilate mankind]]) with the future-set episodes of ''Cloud Atlas'' (in the first instance [[spoiler: a [[Film/SoylentGreen Soylent-Green]]-referencing consumerist dystopia; in the second instance a far-future-set 'last days of humanity']]). The possibilities are fascinating...
** ''The Bone Clocks'' goes even further and connects almost all of his previous novels and fleshes out the entire multiverse. In particular, ''The Thousand Autumns of Jacob De Zoet'' is directly connected [[spoiler: with Dr. Marinus revealed as an ''Main/EternalHero'' and Enomoto's immortality cult as legitimate magic]]. The future setting of ''Cloud Atlas'' and some background on the [[spoiler: Prescients]] are also tied into it.
Mitchell, go [[Author/DavidMitchell here]].


* LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters
* MindScrew
* NoEnding

to:

* LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters
* MindScrew
* NoEnding
RippedFromTheHeadlines: In Literature/{{Ghostwritten}}, the metro sarin attack is heavily based on the real life terrorist attack in Tokyo, 1995.


David Stephen Mitchell (born 12 January 1969) is an English novelist. Best known for his famous work ''Literature/Cloud Atlas''. Mitchell has written the following books:

to:

David Stephen Mitchell (born 12 January 1969) is an English novelist. Best known for his famous work ''Literature/Cloud centuries-spanning epic, ''Cloud Atlas''. Mitchell has written the following books:


* ContinuityNod: David Mitchell's books are noted for their interconnectivity. This is true within single stories (the wondering soul in one of ''Literature/{{Ghostwritten}}''ís narratives, whose travels take it full-circle); within single novels (''Ghostwritten'' and ''Literature/CloudAtlas'' which are both made up of several independent but connected stories), and between novels (and other works). For example, a character from the Frobisher narrative in ''Cloud Atlas'' features prominently in ''Black Swan Green''. A minor character from Marco's narrative in ''Ghostwritten'' starts his story by waking up to a woman whose birthmark marks her as an iteration of the 'soul' that links all of the narratives in ''Cloud Atlas''. The list goes on and on. Even in Mitchell's latest book, ''Literature/TheThousandAutumnsOfJacobDeZoet'', which was seen as a departure from his previous meta/post-modernist fiction into fairly 'straight' historical drama, there is at least one very subtle connection to his earlier book ''Number9Dream'': the minor character Satsuki Miyake comes from Yakushima, hinting that she is the ancestor of Eiji Miyake, protagonist of the earlier work, who also hails from the tiny island. Insofar as Mitchell is writing about the 'real world', past or contemporary, this Verse is quite close to our own. However, Mitchell is also notable for writing science fiction elements into his books. If, as seems to be the case, all Mitchell's works are taking place in the same Verse, we are left to try and reconcile the end of ''Ghostwritten'' (which implies [[spoiler: the self-aware super-computer created by the nice Irish scientist has decided to annihilate mankind]]) with the future-set episodes of ''Cloud Atlas'' (in the first instance [[spoiler: a [[Film/SoylentGreen Soylent-Green]]-referencing consumerist dystopia; in the second instance a far-future-set 'last days of humanity']]). The possibilities are fascinating...

to:

* ContinuityNod: David Mitchell's Mitchellís books are noted for their interconnectivity. This is true within single stories (the wondering soul in one of ''Literature/{{Ghostwritten}}''ís narratives, whose travels take it full-circle); within single novels (''Ghostwritten'' and ''Literature/CloudAtlas'' which are both made up of several independent but connected stories), and between novels (and other works). For example, a character from the Frobisher narrative in ''Cloud Atlas'' features prominently in ''Black Swan Green''. A minor character from Marco's narrative in ''Ghostwritten'' starts his story by waking up to a woman whose birthmark marks her as an iteration of the 'soul' that links all of the narratives in ''Cloud Atlas''. The list goes on and on. Even in Mitchell's latest book, ''Literature/TheThousandAutumnsOfJacobDeZoet'', which was seen as a departure from his previous meta/post-modernist fiction into fairly 'straight' historical drama, there is at least one very subtle connection to his earlier book ''Number9Dream'': the minor character Satsuki Miyake comes from Yakushima, hinting that she is the ancestor of Eiji Miyake, protagonist of the earlier work, who also hails from the tiny island. Insofar as Mitchell is writing about the 'real world', past or contemporary, this Verse is quite close to our own. However, Mitchell is also notable for writing science fiction elements into his books. If, as seems to be the case, all Mitchell's works are taking place in the same Verse, we are left to try and reconcile the end of ''Ghostwritten'' (which implies [[spoiler: the self-aware super-computer created by the nice Irish scientist has decided to annihilate mankind]]) with the future-set episodes of ''Cloud Atlas'' (in the first instance [[spoiler: a [[Film/SoylentGreen Soylent-Green]]-referencing consumerist dystopia; in the second instance a far-future-set 'last days of humanity']]). The possibilities are fascinating...

Added DiffLines:

* DoorStopper: ''TheBoneClocks}}'' US hardcover clocks around 624 pages and''Cloud Atlas'' stands for 509 pages.


** ''The Bone Clocks'' goes even further and connects almost all of his previous novels and fleshes out the entire multiverse. In particular, The Thousand Autumns of Jacob DeZoet is directly connected [[spoiler: with Dr. Marinus revealed as an ''Main/EternalHero'' and Enomoto's immortality cult as legitimate magic]]. The future setting of ''Cloud Atlas'' and some background on the [[spoiler: Prescients]] are also tied into it.

to:

** ''The Bone Clocks'' goes even further and connects almost all of his previous novels and fleshes out the entire multiverse. In particular, The ''The Thousand Autumns of Jacob DeZoet De Zoet'' is directly connected [[spoiler: with Dr. Marinus revealed as an ''Main/EternalHero'' and Enomoto's immortality cult as legitimate magic]]. The future setting of ''Cloud Atlas'' and some background on the [[spoiler: Prescients]] are also tied into it.



** ''The Bone Clocks'' goes even further and connects almost all of his previous novels and fleshes out the entire multiverse. In particular, The Thousand Autumns of Jacob DeZoet is directly connected [[spoiler: with Dr. Marinus revealed as an ''Main/EternalHero'' and Enomoto's immortality cult as legitimate magic]]. The future setting of ''Cloud Atlas'' and some background on the [[spoiler: Prescients]] are also tied into it.

to:

** ''The Bone Clocks'' goes even further and connects almost all of his previous novels and fleshes out the entire multiverse. In particular, The ''The Thousand Autumns of Jacob DeZoet De Zoet'' is directly connected [[spoiler: with Dr. Marinus revealed as an ''Main/EternalHero'' and Enomoto's immortality cult as legitimate magic]]. The future setting of ''Cloud Atlas'' and some background on the [[spoiler: Prescients]] are also tied into it.


* ContinuityNod: David Mitchell's books are noted for their interconnectivity. This is true within single stories (the wondering soul in one of ''Literature/{{Ghostwritten}}'''s narratives, whose travels take it full-circle); within single novels (''Ghostwritten'' and ''Literature/CloudAtlas'' which are both made up of several independent but connected stories), and between novels (and other works). For example, a character from the Frobisher narrative in ''Cloud Atlas'' features prominently in ''Black Swan Green''. A minor character from Marco's narrative in ''Ghostwritten'' starts his story by waking up to a woman whose birthmark marks her as an iteration of the 'soul' that links all of the narratives in ''Cloud Atlas''. The list goes on and on. Even in Mitchell's latest book, ''Literature/TheThousandAutumnsOfJacobDeZoet'', which was seen as a departure from his previous meta/post-modernist fiction into fairly 'straight' historical drama, there is at least one very subtle connection to his earlier book ''Number9Dream'': the minor character Satsuki Miyake comes from Yakushima, hinting that she is the ancestor of Eiji Miyake, protagonist of the earlier work, who also hails from the tiny island. Insofar as Mitchell is writing about the 'real world', past or contemporary, this Verse is quite close to our own. However, Mitchell is also notable for writing science fiction elements into his books. If, as seems to be the case, all Mitchell's works are taking place in the same Verse, we are left to try and reconcile the end of ''Ghostwritten'' (which implies [[spoiler: the self-aware super-computer created by the nice Irish scientist has decided to annihilate mankind]]) with the future-set episodes of ''Cloud Atlas'' (in the first instance [[spoiler: a [[Film/SoylentGreen Soylent-Green]]-referencing consumerist dystopia; in the second instance a far-future-set 'last days of humanity']]). The possibilities are fascinating...

to:

* ContinuityNod: David Mitchell's books are noted for their interconnectivity. This is true within single stories (the wondering soul in one of ''Literature/{{Ghostwritten}}'''s ''Literature/{{Ghostwritten}}''ís narratives, whose travels take it full-circle); within single novels (''Ghostwritten'' and ''Literature/CloudAtlas'' which are both made up of several independent but connected stories), and between novels (and other works). For example, a character from the Frobisher narrative in ''Cloud Atlas'' features prominently in ''Black Swan Green''. A minor character from Marco's narrative in ''Ghostwritten'' starts his story by waking up to a woman whose birthmark marks her as an iteration of the 'soul' that links all of the narratives in ''Cloud Atlas''. The list goes on and on. Even in Mitchell's latest book, ''Literature/TheThousandAutumnsOfJacobDeZoet'', which was seen as a departure from his previous meta/post-modernist fiction into fairly 'straight' historical drama, there is at least one very subtle connection to his earlier book ''Number9Dream'': the minor character Satsuki Miyake comes from Yakushima, hinting that she is the ancestor of Eiji Miyake, protagonist of the earlier work, who also hails from the tiny island. Insofar as Mitchell is writing about the 'real world', past or contemporary, this Verse is quite close to our own. However, Mitchell is also notable for writing science fiction elements into his books. If, as seems to be the case, all Mitchell's works are taking place in the same Verse, we are left to try and reconcile the end of ''Ghostwritten'' (which implies [[spoiler: the self-aware super-computer created by the nice Irish scientist has decided to annihilate mankind]]) with the future-set episodes of ''Cloud Atlas'' (in the first instance [[spoiler: a [[Film/SoylentGreen Soylent-Green]]-referencing consumerist dystopia; in the second instance a far-future-set 'last days of humanity']]). The possibilities are fascinating...



* TheVerse: David Mitchell's books are noted for their interconnectivity. This is true within single stories (the wondering soul in one of ''Literature/{{Ghostwritten}}'''s narratives, whose travels take it full-circle); within single novels (''Ghostwritten'' and ''Literature/CloudAtlas'' which are both made up of several independent but connected stories), and between novels (and other works). For example, a character from the Frobisher narrative in ''Cloud Atlas'' features prominently in ''Black Swan Green''. A minor character from Marco's narrative in ''Ghostwritten'' starts his story by waking up to a woman whose birthmark marks her as an iteration of the 'soul' that links all of the narratives in ''Cloud Atlas''. The list goes on and on. Even in Mitchell's latest book, ''Literature/TheThousandAutumnsOfJacobDeZoet'', which was seen as a departure from his previous meta/post-modernist fiction into fairly 'straight' historical drama, there is at least one very subtle connection to his earlier book ''Number9Dream'': the minor character Satsuki Miyake comes from Yakushima, hinting that she is the ancestor of Eiji Miyake, protagonist of the earlier work, who also hails from the tiny island. Insofar as Mitchell is writing about the 'real world', past or contemporary, this Verse is quite close to our own. However, Mitchell is also notable for writing science fiction elements into his books. If, as seems to be the case, all Mitchell's works are taking place in the same Verse, we are left to try and reconcile the end of ''Ghostwritten'' (which implies [[spoiler: the self-aware super-computer created by the nice Irish scientist has decided to annihilate mankind]]) with the future-set episodes of ''Cloud Atlas'' (in the first instance [[spoiler: a [[Film/SoylentGreen Soylent-Green]]-referencing consumerist dystopia; in the second instance a far-future-set 'last days of humanity']]). The possibilities are fascinating...

to:

* TheVerse: David Mitchell's books are noted for their interconnectivity. This is true within single stories (the wondering soul in one of ''Literature/{{Ghostwritten}}'''s ''Literature/{{Ghostwritten}}''ís narratives, whose travels take it full-circle); within single novels (''Ghostwritten'' and ''Literature/CloudAtlas'' which are both made up of several independent but connected stories), and between novels (and other works). For example, a character from the Frobisher narrative in ''Cloud Atlas'' features prominently in ''Black Swan Green''. A minor character from Marco's narrative in ''Ghostwritten'' starts his story by waking up to a woman whose birthmark marks her as an iteration of the 'soul' that links all of the narratives in ''Cloud Atlas''. The list goes on and on. Even in Mitchell's latest book, ''Literature/TheThousandAutumnsOfJacobDeZoet'', which was seen as a departure from his previous meta/post-modernist fiction into fairly 'straight' historical drama, there is at least one very subtle connection to his earlier book ''Number9Dream'': the minor character Satsuki Miyake comes from Yakushima, hinting that she is the ancestor of Eiji Miyake, protagonist of the earlier work, who also hails from the tiny island. Insofar as Mitchell is writing about the 'real world', past or contemporary, this Verse is quite close to our own. However, Mitchell is also notable for writing science fiction elements into his books. If, as seems to be the case, all Mitchell's works are taking place in the same Verse, we are left to try and reconcile the end of ''Ghostwritten'' (which implies [[spoiler: the self-aware super-computer created by the nice Irish scientist has decided to annihilate mankind]]) with the future-set episodes of ''Cloud Atlas'' (in the first instance [[spoiler: a [[Film/SoylentGreen Soylent-Green]]-referencing consumerist dystopia; in the second instance a far-future-set 'last days of humanity']]). The possibilities are fascinating...


Not the same as the David Mitchell on the ''Series/{{ThatMitchellAndWebbLook}}''.

to:

His work can get rather complicated due its interconnected narratives.

Not the same as the David Mitchell on the ''Series/{{ThatMitchellAndWebbLook}}''.''Series/{{ThatMitchellAndWebbLook}}''.

----
!!Tropes found in his works include:

* AnyoneCanDie
* ContinuityNod: David Mitchell's books are noted for their interconnectivity. This is true within single stories (the wondering soul in one of ''Literature/{{Ghostwritten}}'''s narratives, whose travels take it full-circle); within single novels (''Ghostwritten'' and ''Literature/CloudAtlas'' which are both made up of several independent but connected stories), and between novels (and other works). For example, a character from the Frobisher narrative in ''Cloud Atlas'' features prominently in ''Black Swan Green''. A minor character from Marco's narrative in ''Ghostwritten'' starts his story by waking up to a woman whose birthmark marks her as an iteration of the 'soul' that links all of the narratives in ''Cloud Atlas''. The list goes on and on. Even in Mitchell's latest book, ''Literature/TheThousandAutumnsOfJacobDeZoet'', which was seen as a departure from his previous meta/post-modernist fiction into fairly 'straight' historical drama, there is at least one very subtle connection to his earlier book ''Number9Dream'': the minor character Satsuki Miyake comes from Yakushima, hinting that she is the ancestor of Eiji Miyake, protagonist of the earlier work, who also hails from the tiny island. Insofar as Mitchell is writing about the 'real world', past or contemporary, this Verse is quite close to our own. However, Mitchell is also notable for writing science fiction elements into his books. If, as seems to be the case, all Mitchell's works are taking place in the same Verse, we are left to try and reconcile the end of ''Ghostwritten'' (which implies [[spoiler: the self-aware super-computer created by the nice Irish scientist has decided to annihilate mankind]]) with the future-set episodes of ''Cloud Atlas'' (in the first instance [[spoiler: a [[Film/SoylentGreen Soylent-Green]]-referencing consumerist dystopia; in the second instance a far-future-set 'last days of humanity']]). The possibilities are fascinating...
** ''The Bone Clocks'' goes even further and connects almost all of his previous novels and fleshes out the entire multiverse. In particular, The Thousand Autumns of Jacob DeZoet is directly connected [[spoiler: with Dr. Marinus revealed as an ''Main/EternalHero'' and Enomoto's immortality cult as legitimate magic]]. The future setting of ''Cloud Atlas'' and some background on the [[spoiler: Prescients]] are also tied into it.
* LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters
* MindScrew
* NoEnding
* TheVerse: David Mitchell's books are noted for their interconnectivity. This is true within single stories (the wondering soul in one of ''Literature/{{Ghostwritten}}'''s narratives, whose travels take it full-circle); within single novels (''Ghostwritten'' and ''Literature/CloudAtlas'' which are both made up of several independent but connected stories), and between novels (and other works). For example, a character from the Frobisher narrative in ''Cloud Atlas'' features prominently in ''Black Swan Green''. A minor character from Marco's narrative in ''Ghostwritten'' starts his story by waking up to a woman whose birthmark marks her as an iteration of the 'soul' that links all of the narratives in ''Cloud Atlas''. The list goes on and on. Even in Mitchell's latest book, ''Literature/TheThousandAutumnsOfJacobDeZoet'', which was seen as a departure from his previous meta/post-modernist fiction into fairly 'straight' historical drama, there is at least one very subtle connection to his earlier book ''Number9Dream'': the minor character Satsuki Miyake comes from Yakushima, hinting that she is the ancestor of Eiji Miyake, protagonist of the earlier work, who also hails from the tiny island. Insofar as Mitchell is writing about the 'real world', past or contemporary, this Verse is quite close to our own. However, Mitchell is also notable for writing science fiction elements into his books. If, as seems to be the case, all Mitchell's works are taking place in the same Verse, we are left to try and reconcile the end of ''Ghostwritten'' (which implies [[spoiler: the self-aware super-computer created by the nice Irish scientist has decided to annihilate mankind]]) with the future-set episodes of ''Cloud Atlas'' (in the first instance [[spoiler: a [[Film/SoylentGreen Soylent-Green]]-referencing consumerist dystopia; in the second instance a far-future-set 'last days of humanity']]). The possibilities are fascinating...
** ''The Bone Clocks'' goes even further and connects almost all of his previous novels and fleshes out the entire multiverse. In particular, The Thousand Autumns of Jacob DeZoet is directly connected [[spoiler: with Dr. Marinus revealed as an ''Main/EternalHero'' and Enomoto's immortality cult as legitimate magic]]. The future setting of ''Cloud Atlas'' and some background on the [[spoiler: Prescients]] are also tied into it.


David Stephen Mitchell (born 12 January 1969) is an English novelist. (though not the [[NamesTheSame same]] as the comedian of the same name) best known for his work ''Literature/Cloud Atlas''. Mitchell has written the following books:

to:

David Stephen Mitchell (born 12 January 1969) is an English novelist. (though not the [[NamesTheSame same]] as the comedian of the same name) best Best known for his famous work ''Literature/Cloud Atlas''. Mitchell has written the following books:



Not the same as the David Mitchell on the "Mitchell and Webb" {{sketch show}}s.

to:

Not the same as the David Mitchell on the "Mitchell and Webb" {{sketch show}}s.''Series/{{ThatMitchellAndWebbLook}}''.

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