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* TooGoodForThisSinfulEarth: His favorite disciple Yen Hui (顏回) died young (aged 40). ("There was one, Yen Hui, who loved to learn. He never transferred his anger, nor repeated an error. Sadly his appointed time was short, and he died; now, there are none like him. I have yet to hear of anyone who loves to learn as he did.")

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* TooGoodForThisSinfulEarth: His favorite disciple Yen Yan Hui (顏回) died young (aged 40). ("There was one, Yen Yan Hui, who loved to learn. He never transferred his anger, nor repeated an error. Sadly his appointed time was short, and he died; now, there are none like him. I have yet to hear of anyone who loves to learn as he did.")


* HonorRelatedAbuse: Up against an AbusiveParent or AbusiveSpouse? So long as the beatings don't cause lasting harm, endure them, because that's what filial piety demands. However, as the MyMasterRightOrWrong entry shows, Confucius actually advocates that both parties in a relationship (parent-child, between spouses) have their respective duties.

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* HonorRelatedAbuse: Up against an AbusiveParent or AbusiveSpouse? DomesticAbuse? So long as the beatings don't cause lasting harm, endure them, because that's what filial piety demands. However, as the MyMasterRightOrWrong entry shows, Confucius actually advocates that both parties in a relationship (parent-child, between spouses) have their respective duties.


Confucius's enduring legacy is the codification of an ethos that predated him by centuries into a system of relatively coherent moral codes. [[note]]Indeed, he sees himself as "merely" preserving and passing on values prevalent during the Western Zhou era.[[/note]] In a sense, Confucianism isn't so much a philosophy (or religion, as it is sometimes erroneously called) as a model of behavior. There have been several cycles of decay and revival in the history of Confucianism, but the latest wave of Neo-Confucianism is at the core of what has been claimed as 'traditional' values in East Asia: a strong emphasis on family life and loyalties (filial piety), deference to authority and personal responsibility in authority (feudal loyalty). Associated with these are the prizing of self-discipline and (academic) learning. After his death, it was proclaimed as the official religion/ethos of the Han dynasty (Whether they actually did it is another question entirely, a common proverb about the Han states was that they went for [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Legalism_(Chinese_philosophy) Legalism]] under the banner of Confucianism) and went on to become insanely popular. It was one out of the few hundred schools of thought to actually achieve notoriety and holds enormous sway over modern ideology and politics. [[note]] One reason for the massive influence is that Confucius advocated a path for all scholars, which is for them to become officials. As it turned out, many of Confucius's disciples did become officials, and they in turn used their influences to elevate their teacher to the status of a sage. Another reason is that Confucius's teachings are more easily followed by the upper classes, i.e. the classes who can afford to be educated and then seek their fortunes at officialdom.[[/note]]

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Confucius's enduring legacy is the codification of an ethos that predated him by centuries into a system of relatively coherent moral codes. [[note]]Indeed, he sees himself as "merely" preserving and passing on values prevalent during the Western Zhou era.[[/note]] In a sense, Confucianism isn't so much a philosophy (or religion, as it is sometimes erroneously called) as a model of behavior. There have been several cycles of decay and revival in the history of Confucianism, but the latest wave of Neo-Confucianism is at the core of what has been claimed as 'traditional' values in East Asia: a strong emphasis on family life and loyalties (filial piety), deference to authority and personal responsibility in authority (feudal loyalty). Associated with these are the prizing of self-discipline and (academic) learning. After his death, it was proclaimed as the official religion/ethos of the Han dynasty during the reign of Emperor Wu. (Whether they actually did it is another question entirely, entirely; a common proverb about the Han states was that they went for [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Legalism_(Chinese_philosophy) Legalism]] under the banner of Confucianism) and went on to become insanely popular. It was one out of the few hundred schools of thought to actually achieve notoriety and holds enormous sway over modern ideology and politics. [[note]] One reason for the massive influence is that Confucius advocated a path for all scholars, which is for them to become officials. As it turned out, many of Confucius's disciples did become officials, and they in turn used their influences to elevate their teacher to the status of a sage. Another reason is that Confucius's teachings are more easily followed by the upper classes, i.e. the classes who can afford to be educated and then seek their fortunes at officialdom.[[/note]]


'Confucius' (September 28, 551 BC 479 BC) is the name given to an extremely influential Chinese philosopher who lived in the 6th century BC. After his death, his teachings were compiled in a work known in the English-speaking world as the ''Analects of Confucius'' (Traditional: 論語; Simplified: 论语; Pinyin: ''Lún Yǔ'', lit. "discussion over Confucius' words" -- though analects means "a collection of excerpts from a literary work" and is thus an inaccurate translation).

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'Confucius' (September 28, 551 BC 479 BC) is the name given to an extremely influential Chinese philosopher who lived in the 6th century BC. After his death, his teachings were compiled in a work known in the English-speaking world as the ''Analects of Confucius'' (Traditional: 論語; Simplified: 论语; Pinyin: ''Lún Yǔ'', lit. "discussion over Confucius' words" -- though analects "analects" means "a collection of excerpts from a literary work" and is thus an inaccurate translation).



Confucius's enduring legacy is the codification of an ethos that predated him by centuries into a system of relatively coherent moral codes. [[note]]Indeed, he sees himself as "merely" preserving and passing on values prevalent during the Western Zhou era.[[/note]] In a sense, Confucianism isn't so much a philosophy (or religion, as it is sometimes erroneously called) as a model of behavior. There have been several cycles of decay and revival in the history of Confucianism, but the latest wave of Neo-Confucianism is at the core of what has been claimed as 'traditional' values in East Asia: a strong emphasis on family life and loyalties (filial piety), deference to authority and personal responsibility in authority (feudal loyalty). Associated with these are the prizing of self-discipline and (academic) learning. After his death, it was proclaimed as the official religion/ethos of the Han dynasty (Whether they actually did it is another question entirely, a common proverb about the Han states that they went for [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Legalism_(Chinese_philosophy) Legalism]] under the banner of Confucianism) and went on to become insanely popular. It was one out of the few hundred schools of thought to actually achieve notoriety and holds enormous sway over modern ideology and politics. [[note]] One reason for the massive influence is that Confucius advocated a path for all scholars, which is for them to become officials. As it turned out, many of Confucius's disciples did become officials, and they in turn used their influences to elevate their teacher to the status of a sage. Another reason is that Confucius's teachings are more easily followed by the upper classes, i.e. the classes who can afford to be educated and then seek their fortunes at officialdom.[[/note]]

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Confucius's enduring legacy is the codification of an ethos that predated him by centuries into a system of relatively coherent moral codes. [[note]]Indeed, he sees himself as "merely" preserving and passing on values prevalent during the Western Zhou era.[[/note]] In a sense, Confucianism isn't so much a philosophy (or religion, as it is sometimes erroneously called) as a model of behavior. There have been several cycles of decay and revival in the history of Confucianism, but the latest wave of Neo-Confucianism is at the core of what has been claimed as 'traditional' values in East Asia: a strong emphasis on family life and loyalties (filial piety), deference to authority and personal responsibility in authority (feudal loyalty). Associated with these are the prizing of self-discipline and (academic) learning. After his death, it was proclaimed as the official religion/ethos of the Han dynasty (Whether they actually did it is another question entirely, a common proverb about the Han states was that they went for [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Legalism_(Chinese_philosophy) Legalism]] under the banner of Confucianism) and went on to become insanely popular. It was one out of the few hundred schools of thought to actually achieve notoriety and holds enormous sway over modern ideology and politics. [[note]] One reason for the massive influence is that Confucius advocated a path for all scholars, which is for them to become officials. As it turned out, many of Confucius's disciples did become officials, and they in turn used their influences to elevate their teacher to the status of a sage. Another reason is that Confucius's teachings are more easily followed by the upper classes, i.e. the classes who can afford to be educated and then seek their fortunes at officialdom.[[/note]]



* ThePhilosopherKing: Not one himself, but his philosophy was expected to be followed by any Emperor worth his salt. Given that the historians were Confucian, how well they did so pretty much determined their later reputations.

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* ThePhilosopherKing: Not one himself, but his philosophy was expected to be followed by any Emperor worth his salt. Given that the most Chinese historians in those days were Confucian, how well they did so pretty much determined their later reputations.



* TooGoodForThisSinfulEarth: His favorite disciple Yen Hui (顏回) died young. ("There was one, Yen Hui, who loved to learn. He never transferred his anger, nor repeated an error. Sadly his appointed time was short, and he died; now, there are none like him. I have yet to hear of anyone who loves to learn as he did.")

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* TooGoodForThisSinfulEarth: His favorite disciple Yen Hui (顏回) died young.young (aged 40). ("There was one, Yen Hui, who loved to learn. He never transferred his anger, nor repeated an error. Sadly his appointed time was short, and he died; now, there are none like him. I have yet to hear of anyone who loves to learn as he did.")


* GentleGiant: According to legend, was 9 and a half feet tall, though units were shorter then, so who knows? [[note]]The Chinese feet (''chi'') during the Eastern Zhou era varied from 0.22m to 0.231m., which would make Confucius very tall in the modern age, and an absolute giant back in his day.[[/note]] As a side note, his height could have been inherited from his father, who was even taller and said to be a great warrior.

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* GentleGiant: According to legend, was 9 and a half feet tall, though units were shorter then, so who knows? [[note]]The Chinese feet (''chi'') during the Eastern Zhou era varied from 0.22m to 0.231m., which would make Confucius very tall in the modern age, and an absolute giant back in his day.[[/note]] As a side note, his height could have been inherited from his father, who was even taller and was said to be a great warrior.warrior, with great strength to boot.


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*ImpoverishedPatrician: His father was a distinguished military officer, but died when Confucius was three; Confucius lived in poverty together with his mother during his childhood and adolescence.

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**His father Kong He was a military officer and was said to have a quick temper.


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*LikeFatherLikeSon /LikeFatherUnlikeSon: Played with. Confucius was said to have inherited his father's height; unlike the old man, he did not have a quick temper, although some of his students (particularly Zilu) might agree that he had a sharp tongue.


* GentleGiant: According to legend, was 9 and a half feet tall, though units were shorter then, so who knows? [[note]]The Chinese feet (''chi'') during the Eastern Zhou era varied from 0.22m to 0.231m., which would make Confucius very tall in the modern age, and an absolute giant back in his day.[[/note]]

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* GentleGiant: According to legend, was 9 and a half feet tall, though units were shorter then, so who knows? [[note]]The Chinese feet (''chi'') during the Eastern Zhou era varied from 0.22m to 0.231m., which would make Confucius very tall in the modern age, and an absolute giant back in his day.[[/note]][[/note]] As a side note, his height could have been inherited from his father, who was even taller and said to be a great warrior.


* YoungestChildWins: Yan Zhengzai, Confucius's mother. She was the youngest of the three Yan daughters. When the 65-year old Shu Lianghe made a request of a marriage to the Yan family, Zhengzai's father asked his three daughters who was willing to marry him. The two older sisters did not answer, but Zhengzai said she was OK. Through this marriage, she became the mother of one of the wisest Chinese men.

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* YoungestChildWins: Yan Zhengzai, Confucius's mother. She was the youngest of the three Yan daughters. When the 65-year old Kong He (also known as Shu Lianghe Lianghe) made a request of a marriage request to the Yan family, Zhengzai's father asked his three daughters who if anyone was willing to marry him.Kong He. The two older sisters did not answer, but Zhengzai said she was OK. Through this marriage, she became the mother of one of the wisest men in Chinese men.history. [[note]]Kong He himself was said to be ''ten feet'' tall and once held open a city gate so that soldiers from his side who had already entered the city could escape, and the incident happened when Kong He was pushing ''60''.[[/note]]


Confucius's enduring legacy is the codification of an ethos that predated him by centuries into a system of relatively coherent moral codes. [[note]]Indeed, he sees himself as "merely" preserving and passing on values prevalent during the Western Zhou era.[[/note]] In a sense, Confucianism isn't so much a philosophy (or religion, as it is sometimes erroneously called) as a model of behavior. There have been several cycles of decay and revival in the history of Confucianism, but the latest wave of Neo-Confucianism is at the core of what has been claimed as 'traditional' values in East Asia: a strong emphasis on family life and loyalties (filial piety), deference to authority and personal responsibility in authority (feudal loyalty). Associated with these are the prizing of self-discipline and (academic) learning. After his death, it was proclaimed as the official religion/ethos of the Han dynasty (Whether they actually did it is another question entirely, a common proverb about the Han states that they went for [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Legalism_(Chinese_philosophy) Legalism]] under the banner of Confucianism) and went on to become insanely popular. It was one of the few hundred schools of thought to actually achieve notoriety and holds enormous sway over modern ideology and politics. [[note]] One reason for the massive influence is that Confucius advocated a path for all scholars, which is for them to become officials. As it turned out, many of Confucius's disciples did become officials, and they in turn used their influences to elevate their teacher to the status of a sage. Another reason is that Confucius's teachings are more easily followed by the upper classes, i.e. the classes who can afford to be educated and then seek their fortunes at officialdom.[[/note]]

to:

Confucius's enduring legacy is the codification of an ethos that predated him by centuries into a system of relatively coherent moral codes. [[note]]Indeed, he sees himself as "merely" preserving and passing on values prevalent during the Western Zhou era.[[/note]] In a sense, Confucianism isn't so much a philosophy (or religion, as it is sometimes erroneously called) as a model of behavior. There have been several cycles of decay and revival in the history of Confucianism, but the latest wave of Neo-Confucianism is at the core of what has been claimed as 'traditional' values in East Asia: a strong emphasis on family life and loyalties (filial piety), deference to authority and personal responsibility in authority (feudal loyalty). Associated with these are the prizing of self-discipline and (academic) learning. After his death, it was proclaimed as the official religion/ethos of the Han dynasty (Whether they actually did it is another question entirely, a common proverb about the Han states that they went for [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Legalism_(Chinese_philosophy) Legalism]] under the banner of Confucianism) and went on to become insanely popular. It was one out of the few hundred schools of thought to actually achieve notoriety and holds enormous sway over modern ideology and politics. [[note]] One reason for the massive influence is that Confucius advocated a path for all scholars, which is for them to become officials. As it turned out, many of Confucius's disciples did become officials, and they in turn used their influences to elevate their teacher to the status of a sage. Another reason is that Confucius's teachings are more easily followed by the upper classes, i.e. the classes who can afford to be educated and then seek their fortunes at officialdom.[[/note]]


* IntrepidMerchant: To Confucius' chagrin, Zigong (子贡), one of his disciples. Trade is rarely considered an honourable profession by Confucians as merchants do not produce anything for themselves or others, but instead deal in the fruits of others' labours. Nevertheless, he was one of Confucius' important disciples, one who used his money and influence to protect Confucian sects in the 'age of martial philosophies'.

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* IntrepidMerchant: To Confucius' chagrin, Zigong (子贡), (子贡, full name Duanmu Ci), one of his disciples. Trade is rarely considered an honourable profession by Confucians as merchants do not produce anything for themselves or others, but instead deal in the fruits of others' labours. Nevertheless, he was one of Confucius' important disciples, one who used his money and influence to protect Confucian sects in the 'age of martial philosophies'.


The name "Confucius" comes from the 16th century Latin translation of the ''Analects'' by the Jesuit scholar Matteo Ricci, who introduced him to the Catholic world. The Mandarin is ''Kǒng zǐ'' (孔子; "Master Kong") or ''Kǒng Fūzǐ'' (孔夫子 "Grand Master Kong"). [[AlternateCharacterReading He is known as Koshi in Japan]]. In Chinese tradition, his [[IHaveManyNames names]] are (in Hanyu Pinyin) ''Qiu'' (丘) and ''Zhongni'' (仲尼). (Yes, you can call him "Johnny Kong" if you want to be utterly informal.)

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The name "Confucius" comes from the 16th century Latin translation of the ''Analects'' by the Jesuit scholar Matteo Ricci, who introduced him to the Catholic world. The Mandarin is ''Kǒng zǐ'' (孔子; "Master Kong") or ''Kǒng Fūzǐ'' (孔夫子 "Grand Master Kong"). [[AlternateCharacterReading He is known as Koshi in Japan]]. In Chinese tradition, his [[IHaveManyNames names]] are (in Hanyu Pinyin) ''Qiu'' (丘) and ''Zhongni'' (仲尼).(仲尼, his courtesy name and almost never used by his disciples). (Yes, you can call him "Johnny Kong" if you want to be utterly informal.)


* GentleGiant: According to legend, was 9 and a half feet tall, though units were shorter then, so who knows?

to:

* GentleGiant: According to legend, was 9 and a half feet tall, though units were shorter then, so who knows? [[note]]The Chinese feet (''chi'') during the Eastern Zhou era varied from 0.22m to 0.231m., which would make Confucius very tall in the modern age, and an absolute giant back in his day.[[/note]]

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* YoungestChildWins: Yan Zhengzai, Confucius's mother. She was the youngest of the three Yan daughters. When the 65-year old Shu Lianghe made a request of a marriage to the Yan family, Zhengzai's father asked his three daughters who was willing to marry him. The two older sisters did not answer, but Zhengzai said she was OK. Through this marriage, she became the mother of one of the wisest Chinese men.


* {{Crossover}}: His legendary meeting with Creator/Laozi, the other famous Chinese philosopher, in Luoyang.

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* {{Crossover}}: His legendary meeting with Creator/Laozi, Creator/{{Laozi}}, the other famous Chinese philosopher, in Luoyang.

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* {{Crossover}}: His legendary meeting with Creator/Laozi, the other famous Chinese philosopher, in Luoyang.

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