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* HumanoidAbomination: Knygathin Zhaum in "The Testament of Athammaus" is a criminal who turns out to be a descendant of Tsathoggua, and has an appearance that suggests something snake-like and amorphous about his body. After being decapitated twice, he spontaneously revived himself, becoming more monstrous than before. After the third decapitation, well, suffice to say [[OneWingedAngel the "humanoid" part of this trope is averted]].


Clark Ashton Smith (January 13, 1893 August 14, 1961) was an American writer of {{horror}}, {{fantasy}} and ScienceFiction. He is most notable for being one of the founders of the Franchise/CthulhuMythos along with Creator/HPLovecraft, Creator/RobertEHoward and others. Smith's early works were influenced by Creator/TheBrothersGrimm, Creator/EdgarAllanPoe, and William Beckford's Literature/Vathek, while his early poetry caught the attention of George Sterling, who helped him publish ''The Star-Treader and Other Poems'', his first collection of poetry, and also introduced him to the poetry of Charles Baudelaire, who became another important influence on Smith. Smith's 1920 poem ''The Hashish Eater, or The Apocalypse of Evil'' prompted H. P. Lovecraft to send him a fan letter, which was the beginning of a lifelong friendship and correspondence between the two.

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Clark Ashton Smith (January 13, 1893 August 14, 1961) was an American writer of {{horror}}, {{fantasy}} and ScienceFiction. He is most notable for being one of the founders of the Franchise/CthulhuMythos along with Creator/HPLovecraft, Creator/RobertEHoward and others. Smith's early works were influenced by Creator/TheBrothersGrimm, Creator/EdgarAllanPoe, and William Beckford's Literature/Vathek, Literature/{{Vathek}}, while his early poetry caught the attention of George Sterling, who helped him publish ''The Star-Treader and Other Poems'', his first collection of poetry, and also introduced him to the poetry of Charles Baudelaire, who became another important influence on Smith.influence. Smith's 1920 poem ''The Hashish Eater, or The Apocalypse of Evil'' prompted H. P. Lovecraft to send him a fan letter, which was the beginning of a lifelong friendship and correspondence between the two.


Clark Ashton Smith (January 13, 1893 August 14, 1961) was an American writer of {{horror}}, {{fantasy}} and ScienceFiction. He is most notable for being one of the founders of the Franchise/CthulhuMythos along with Creator/HPLovecraft, Creator/RobertEHoward and others.

to:

Clark Ashton Smith (January 13, 1893 August 14, 1961) was an American writer of {{horror}}, {{fantasy}} and ScienceFiction. He is most notable for being one of the founders of the Franchise/CthulhuMythos along with Creator/HPLovecraft, Creator/RobertEHoward and others.
others. Smith's early works were influenced by Creator/TheBrothersGrimm, Creator/EdgarAllanPoe, and William Beckford's Literature/Vathek, while his early poetry caught the attention of George Sterling, who helped him publish ''The Star-Treader and Other Poems'', his first collection of poetry, and also introduced him to the poetry of Charles Baudelaire, who became another important influence on Smith. Smith's 1920 poem ''The Hashish Eater, or The Apocalypse of Evil'' prompted H. P. Lovecraft to send him a fan letter, which was the beginning of a lifelong friendship and correspondence between the two.


%%* CosmicHorrorStory: Mostly parodied. The eldritch horrors tend to be much more willing to interact with humans, and either have a pety cruel streak to their torment, or are rather laid back and affable.
%%* CruelAndUnusualDeath: One Zothique story has the villain devoured by the very same plants he used to dispose of his enemies as a garden.

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%%* * CosmicHorrorStory: Mostly parodied. The eldritch horrors tend to be much more willing to interact with humans, and either have a pety cruel streak to their torment, or are rather laid back and affable.
%%* * CruelAndUnusualDeath: One Zothique story has the villain devoured by the very same plants he used to dispose of his enemies as a garden.



%%* EldritchAbomination

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%%* EldritchAbomination* EldritchAbomination: Typical for the Hyperborea setting. Rabilar Voos encounters many under the thrall of seven geases, Knygathin Zhaum gradually turns into one, Satampras Zeiros and Tirouv Oumpalios run into one in Tsathoggua's temple.



* HopeSpot: The final geas upon Rabilar Vooz tasks him with seeking out the "Outer World", or "go back outside". [[spoiler: Unfortunately, one of the spider-web bridges he has to cross was weakened by an EldritchAbomination that passed before him, and he plummets to his doom.]]



%%* {{Necromancer}}

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%%* {{Necromancer}}* {{Necromancer}}: Show up quite frequently in the tales.
** Nathaire in ''The Colossus of Ylourgne'', who raises his evil minions from the dead and ultimately builds a colossus made of corpses to transfer his mind into.
** Abnon-Tha and his apprentices Narghai and Vemba-Tsith from ''The Charnel God'', who disobey the rules of the priests of Mordiggian to raise a recently-deceased young woman in order for Abnon-Tha to use as he pleases.
** Mmatmuor and Sodosma from ''The Empire of the Necromancers'', who, as the title suggests, raise the corpses littering a fallen empire so that they may rule over them as emperors.


[[quoteright:236:https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/clarkashtonsmith_236x281.jpg]]

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[[quoteright:236:https://static.[[quoteright:220:https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/clarkashtonsmith_236x281.jpg]] org/pmwiki/pub/images/220px_clark_ashton_smith_1912_2.jpg]]


Also unlike Lovecraft, sexuality plays a strong role in many of Smith's works and female characters are a lot stronger and more prominent than in Lovecraft (most likely to Smith having a much more... ''active'' love life than Lovecraft). Unlike Howard, sorcerers in Smith [[LinearWarriorsQuadraticWizards tend to have the upper hand against swordsmen]] and Smith has many sorcerer protagonists, both good and evil. And finally, Smith was not as much a racist or a xenophobe as Lovecraft, which can be seen best in stories like ''The Great God Awto'' and ''A Star-Change'', although reading his Zothique stories show he was still very much a man of his time. Smith was very fond of PurpleProse and one often needs to have a thesaurus handy to fully appreciate the meaning of some of his descriptions.

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Also unlike Lovecraft, sexuality Sexuality plays a strong role in many of Smith's works and female characters are a lot stronger and more prominent than in Lovecraft (most likely to Smith having a much more... ''active'' love life than Lovecraft). Unlike Howard, sorcerers in Smith [[LinearWarriorsQuadraticWizards tend to have the upper hand against swordsmen]] and Smith has many sorcerer protagonists, both good and evil. And finally, Smith was not as much a racist or a xenophobe as Lovecraft, which can be seen best in stories like ''The Great God Awto'' and ''A Star-Change'', although reading his Zothique stories show he was still very much a man of his time. Smith was very fond of PurpleProse and one often needs to have a thesaurus handy to fully appreciate the meaning of some of his descriptions.

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-> ''Tell me many tales, but let them be of things that are past the lore of legend and of which there are no myths in our world or any world adjoining. Tell me, if you will, of the years when the moon was young, with siren-rippled seas and mountains that were zoned with flowers from base to summit; tell me of the planets gray with eld, of the worlds whereon no mortal astronomer has ever looked, and whose mystic heavens and horizons have given pause to visionaries. Tell me of the vaster blossoms within whose cradling chalices a woman could sleep; of the seas of fire that beat on strands of ever-during ice; of perfumes that can give eternal slumber in a breath; of eyeless titans that dwell in Uranus, and beings that wander in the green light of the twin suns of azure and orange. Tell me tales of inconceivable fear and unimaginable love, in orbs whereto our sun is a nameless star, or unto which its rays have never reached.''
-->-- '''Clark Ashton Smith''', ''To the Daemon''


Like Lovecraft's, Clark's stories were often inspired by the nightmares he suffered in his youth. However, Smith's stories tend to focus less on the CosmicHorrorStory and more on the pure exoticism of the setting. Some Mythos entities recur between them, such as the god Tsathoggua, but these entities tend to be less malevolent in Smith's portrayal than in Lovecraft's. While Smith is best known for his prose stories, he personally considered them secondary to his poetry (sometimes going as far as calling them "quasi-hackwork", and the vast majority were written to help him raise funds for his ailing parents in the period from 1929 to 1934. After their deaths, as well as that of his friends Lovecraft and Howard, Smith's prose output dwindled dramatically, and he returned to poetry and began sculpting (usually small soft rock sculptures of strange beings).

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Like Lovecraft's, Clark's stories were often inspired by the nightmares he suffered in his youth. However, Smith's stories tend to focus less on the CosmicHorrorStory and more on the pure exoticism of the setting. Some Mythos entities recur between them, such as the god Tsathoggua, but these entities tend to be less malevolent in Smith's portrayal than in Lovecraft's. While Smith is best known for his prose stories, he personally considered them secondary to his poetry (sometimes going as far as calling them "quasi-hackwork", "quasi-hackwork"), and the vast majority were written to help him raise funds for his ailing parents in the period from 1929 to 1934. After their deaths, as well as that of his friends Lovecraft and Howard, Smith's prose output dwindled dramatically, and he returned to poetry and began sculpting (usually small soft rock sculptures of strange beings).


Compared to Lovecraft's, Smith's stories tend to focus less on the CosmicHorrorStory and more on the pure exoticism of the setting. Some Mythos entities recur between them, such as the god Tsathoggua, but these entities tend to be less malevolent in Smith's portrayal than in Lovecraft's.

Also unlike Lovecraft, sexuality plays a strong role in many of Smith's works and female characters are a lot stronger and more prominent than in Lovecraft (most likely to Smith having a much more... ''active'' love life than Lovecraft). Unlike Howard, sorcerers in Smith [[LinearWarriorsQuadraticWizards tend to have the upper hand against swordsmen]] and Smith has many sorcerer protagonists, both good and evil. And finally, Smith was not as much a racist or a xenophobe as Lovecraft, which can be seen best in stories like ''The Great God Awto'' and ''A Star-Change'', although reading his Zothique stories show he was still very much a man of his time.

Smith was fond of playing with tropes and his stories occasionally feature BlackComedy. The classic ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' module ''Castle Amber'' draws inspiration from his stories set in his fictional Averoigne setting.

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Compared to Like Lovecraft's, Clark's stories were often inspired by the nightmares he suffered in his youth. However, Smith's stories tend to focus less on the CosmicHorrorStory and more on the pure exoticism of the setting. Some Mythos entities recur between them, such as the god Tsathoggua, but these entities tend to be less malevolent in Smith's portrayal than in Lovecraft's.

Lovecraft's. While Smith is best known for his prose stories, he personally considered them secondary to his poetry (sometimes going as far as calling them "quasi-hackwork", and the vast majority were written to help him raise funds for his ailing parents in the period from 1929 to 1934. After their deaths, as well as that of his friends Lovecraft and Howard, Smith's prose output dwindled dramatically, and he returned to poetry and began sculpting (usually small soft rock sculptures of strange beings).

Also unlike Lovecraft, sexuality plays a strong role in many of Smith's works and female characters are a lot stronger and more prominent than in Lovecraft (most likely to Smith having a much more... ''active'' love life than Lovecraft). Unlike Howard, sorcerers in Smith [[LinearWarriorsQuadraticWizards tend to have the upper hand against swordsmen]] and Smith has many sorcerer protagonists, both good and evil. And finally, Smith was not as much a racist or a xenophobe as Lovecraft, which can be seen best in stories like ''The Great God Awto'' and ''A Star-Change'', although reading his Zothique stories show he was still very much a man of his time.

time. Smith was very fond of PurpleProse and one often needs to have a thesaurus handy to fully appreciate the meaning of some of his descriptions.

Smith was fond of playing with tropes and deconstructing pulp traditions, and his stories occasionally feature BlackComedy. The classic ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' module ''Castle Amber'' draws inspiration from his stories set in his fictional Averoigne setting.

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[[quoteright:236:https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/clarkashtonsmith_236x281.jpg]]

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* YellowPeril: The inhabitants of Uccastrog are described in this way in ''The Isle of the Torturers''.
-->''They wore fantastic turbans of blood-red, and were clad in closely fitting robes of vulturine black. Their faces and hands were yellow as saffron; their small and slaty eyes were set obliquely beneath lashless lids; and their thin lips, which smiled eternally, were crooked. as the blades of scimitars. [...] Their speech was no less alien than their aspect; it was full of sharp and hissing sounds; and neither the king nor his slaves could comprehend it.''


%% ZeroContextExample entries are not allowed on wiki pages. All such entries have been commented out. Add context to the entries before uncommenting them.

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%% ZeroContextExample Administrivia/ZeroContextExample entries are not allowed on wiki pages. All such entries have been commented out. Add context to the entries before uncommenting them.


* ApatheticCitizens: In ''The Dark Eidolon'', before [[spoilers: Narthos is nearly trampled to death underneath hooves, people as pass by and do nothing as the beggar boy is hated by the city]], this sets in the entire revenge plot.

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* ApatheticCitizens: In ''The Dark Eidolon'', before [[spoilers: [[spoiler: Narthos is nearly trampled to death underneath hooves, people as pass by and do nothing as the beggar boy is hated by the city]], this sets in the entire revenge plot.

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* ApatheticCitizens: In ''The Dark Eidolon'', before [[spoilers: Narthos is nearly trampled to death underneath hooves, people as pass by and do nothing as the beggar boy is hated by the city]], this sets in the entire revenge plot.


Clark Ashton Smith (1893-1961) was an American writer of {{horror}}, {{fantasy}} and ScienceFiction. He is most notable for being one of the founders of the Franchise/CthulhuMythos along with Creator/HPLovecraft, Creator/RobertEHoward and others.

to:

Clark Ashton Smith (1893-1961) (January 13, 1893 August 14, 1961) was an American writer of {{horror}}, {{fantasy}} and ScienceFiction. He is most notable for being one of the founders of the Franchise/CthulhuMythos along with Creator/HPLovecraft, Creator/RobertEHoward and others.

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