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* OverlyLongSpanishName: The (supposedly Portuguese) Jacinto Gomez y Sereno y Bolivar y Talacayud. [[ButtMonkey Naturally]], [[{{Eaglelane}} Sonny]] can't remember any of them.

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* BeenThereShapedHistory: Occasionally;
** Buck and his comrades are responsible for bringing the plans for the upcoming offensive into Burma to the Allied forces in China.
** Fifty years later, they also strike the first blow against the Serbian forces surrounding Sarajevo (albeit as part of an unofficial force).
** More commonly, Danny would simply be a participant in real world events, such as the attack on Pearl Harbor or the Battle of Midway.


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* CoolPlane: Comes with the premise.


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* EmptyQuiver: Twice. The first time, the nuke is lost in Central America and a rebel general finds it and plans to use it. The second time, it's actually stolen by a terrorist movement.


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* PlausibleDeniability: Buck, Tumb, and Sonny are regularly assigned to work undercover in positions where they will be disavowed by Washington if they're caught.


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* SomethingCompletelyDifferent: Most of Buck Danny's adventures involve him being on a mission for the U.S. Navy or Air Force. The exception is the "oil gangsters" story arc, where he, Tumb, and Sonny, demobilized at the end of World War Two, accept a job as cargo pilots in the Middle East and find themselves involved in a crime/conspiracy story involving arms dealing, drug trafficking, oil politics, and palace plots. (The next story arc returns them to military service).


* DodgeByBraking: A Soviet pilot in a Mig-29 pulls the stunt against both Buck Danny and Sonny Tuckson--twice--in "Les Agresseurs".

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* DodgeByBraking: A Soviet pilot in a Mig-29 [=MiG=]-29 pulls the stunt against both Buck Danny and Sonny Tuckson--twice--in "Les Agresseurs".



* HeroesFightBarehanded: an aerial version of this in "Zone Interdite." Buck, with Tumb and Sonny onboard, is escaping an enemy airbase in a Cessna with no weapons, while pursued by a fully armed MiG-23. Buck manages to draw it in by flying close to the ground in a mountainous region, avoiding both of its missiles and then its cannon, until, while trying to line up the much slower Cessna, the MiG pilot falls below the minimum required airspeed and crashes into a canyon wall.

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* HeroesFightBarehanded: an aerial version of this in "Zone Interdite." Buck, with Tumb and Sonny onboard, is escaping an enemy airbase in a Cessna with no weapons, while pursued by a fully armed MiG-23. [=MiG=]-23. Buck manages to draw it in by flying close to the ground in a mountainous region, avoiding both of its missiles and then its cannon, until, while trying to line up the much slower Cessna, the MiG [=MiG=] pilot falls below the minimum required airspeed and crashes into a canyon wall.


* LanternJawOfJustice: Buck has one. Tumbler's is less pronounced, but still here.

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* LanternJawOfJustice: Buck has one.Buck's chin is the squarest appearing in the comic. Tumbler's is less pronounced, but still here.

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* LanternJawOfJustice: Buck has one. Tumbler's is less pronounced, but still here.

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** In an interesting variation, the characters also use the Imperial System in all of their conversations (even when not on a plane), with a footnote providing the conversion to metric.

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* CrouchingMoronHiddenBadass: Sonny has shades of this. One minute he's acting as TheDitz or even TheLoad, the next he's single-handedly stopping the bad guys plans all by himself. In fact, a good indicator of how Sonny is going to shine during a story is how much he screws up at the beginning: if he embarrasses himself in front of the entire crew of the carrier, accidentally punches the admiral out, or falls for a HoneyTrap, chances are he will have achieved some impressive feat by the end.


* EjectionSeat: [[http://adproject.free.fr/wordpress/?p=343/ This blog]] calculates that, by the 51th installment, Buck and Tumbler have ejected ten times each, and Sonny eight times. [[ComingInHot Including the times they didn't eject]], they scrapped a total of 51 planes worth about 480 million dollars.

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* EjectionSeat: [[http://adproject.free.fr/wordpress/?p=343/ This blog]] calculates that, by the 51th installment, Buck and Tumbler have ejected ten times each, and Sonny eight times. [[ComingInHot Including the times they didn't eject]], they scrapped a total of 51 planes worth about 480 million dollars. One of the few unrealistic aspect of the series, which is usually [[ShownTheirWork very well documented]], is that ejection is never considered as dangerous in itself, and absolutely no one suffers any bad effect from one (except when they can't parachute to safety).

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* ChromosomeCasting: Female characters are very rare in the series, at least in the books written by Charlier. The first books do feature an intrepid female nurse and a MI-6 female agent, but soon the only women are either wives (or widows...) of pilots, Sonny's various doomed attempts at finding a fiancée, or enemy spies. And of course [[ArchEnemy Lady X]].


* BedouinRescueService

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* BedouinRescueServiceBedouinRescueService: Occurs during their adventures as civilians in the Middle East.


* ButtMonkey: Sonny.

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* ButtMonkey: Sonny. Expect him to fail spectacularly whenever he brags about his abilities, either because he was obviously exaggerating by a large margin or due to some perfectly timed stroke of bad luck.


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** The very first pages of the series also had them narrated by Buck. This is dropped rather quickly.

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* TechnologyMarchesOn: An early album had the enemy's near-scifi secret weapon revealed to be... a heat-seeking missile.

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* ArtEvolution: The first few books are drawn in a far less detailed style, especially for the characters.

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* EvilPaysBetter: [[spoiler: Lady X, the heroes' rival and international mercenary spy]], is a former USAF test pilot who defected after seeing there is way more profit to be made by breaking the law.


* CorruptCorporateExecutive: one of the more common types of villains. Oil barons trying to take over the postwar Arab oil market, aircraft constructors trying to cheat the government or eliminate their competition, shady business cartels propping up third world dictators, arms dealers.

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* CorruptCorporateExecutive: one of the more common types of villains. Oil barons trying to take over the postwar Arab oil market, aircraft constructors trying to cheat the government or eliminate their competition, shady business cartels propping up third world dictators, arms dealers.dealers playing both sides of a war.



* FictionalCountry: one of the most common settings in the comic. After two volumes set in the Korean War, the authors were warned that their series would be banned in France (not their country, but still their biggest market) if it didn't stop referencing contemporary "political" issues. As a result, inventing entire countries to get around this restriction became commonplace. As of now, we've had three [[BananaRepublic Banana Republics]] (Mantegua, Inagua, and Managua), one {{Qurac}} (the Oulai sheikdom), and two [[{{Wutai}} Wutais]] (Vien Tan and North Sarawak). Note that many of these are based on real locations - Great Inagua and Little Inagua are actual islands in the Caribbean (albeit part of the Bahamas), Sarawak is an actual region in Borneo (albeit part of Malaysia), and Managua is a real city in Central America (the capital of Nicaragua). Finally, "Vien Tan" was a blatant near-anagram for Vietnam (in a story similarly featuring an American-friendly regime undermined by a revolution).

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* FictionalCountry: one of the most common settings in the comic. After two volumes set in the Korean War, the authors were warned that their series would be banned in France (not their country, but still their biggest market) if it didn't stop referencing contemporary "political" issues. As a result, inventing entire countries to get around this restriction became commonplace. As of now, we've had three [[BananaRepublic Banana Republics]] (Mantegua, Inagua, and Managua), one {{Qurac}} (the Oulai sheikdom), and two [[{{Wutai}} Wutais]] (Vien Tan and North Sarawak). Note that many of these are based on real locations - Great Inagua and Little Inagua are actual islands in the Caribbean (albeit part of the Bahamas), Sarawak is an actual region in Borneo (albeit part of Malaysia), and Managua is a real city in Central America (the capital of Nicaragua). Finally, "Vien Tan" was a blatant near-anagram for Vietnam (in a story similarly featuring an American-friendly regime undermined by a revolution).



* GratuitousEnglish: as is common in Belgian comics. Amusingly, the expressions used are often British rather than American (i.e. any expression including the word "bloody"), as British English is what most people on the continent have had the most exposure to.
* HeroesFightBarehanded: an aerial version of this in "Zone Interdite." Buck, with Tumb and Sonny onboard, is escaping an enemy airbase in a Cessna with no weapons, while pursued by a fully armed MiG-23. Buck manages to draw it in by flying close to the ground in a mountainous region, avoiding both of its missiles and then its cannon, until, while trying to line up the much slower Cessna, the MiG pilot loses the necessary airspeed and crashes into a canyon wall.

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* GratuitousEnglish: as is common in Belgian comics.frequently. Amusingly, the expressions used are often British rather than American (i.e. any expression including the word "bloody"), as British English is being what most people on the continent Europeans have had the most exposure to.
* HeroesFightBarehanded: an aerial version of this in "Zone Interdite." Buck, with Tumb and Sonny onboard, is escaping an enemy airbase in a Cessna with no weapons, while pursued by a fully armed MiG-23. Buck manages to draw it in by flying close to the ground in a mountainous region, avoiding both of its missiles and then its cannon, until, while trying to line up the much slower Cessna, the MiG pilot loses falls below the necessary minimum required airspeed and crashes into a canyon wall.



* HiredGuns: very common villains, especially mooks. Lady X is the most memorable version, a spy and pilot who will work for anybody if the price is right. Even without her, however, the villains' air forces are usually manned by mercenaries. The PrivateMilitaryContractors type is the most common, but FormerRegimePersonnel will also appear from time to time, including several Imperial Japanese veterans and two pilots from the Shah of Iran's air force.

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* HiredGuns: very common villains, especially mooks. Lady X is the most memorable version, a spy and pilot who will work for anybody if the price is right. Even without her, however, the villains' air forces are usually manned by mercenaries. The PrivateMilitaryContractors type is the most common, but FormerRegimePersonnel will also appear from time to time, including several Imperial Japanese veterans and two pilots from the former Shah of Iran's air force.



* LivingLegend: Buck. There are many examples, but probably the best one comes towards the beginning of "Tonnerre Sur La Cordillère." Buck is fleeing for his life on a stolen F-18, with enemy fighters in hot pursuit. He has no way of positively identifying himself for his aircraft carrier, and the officers on the bridge are hesitant to intervene in a fight between foreign fighters without confirmation that one of their own is involved. This lasts until Buck is seen evading the first enemy volley, at which point the admiral comments "do you know a lot of pilots who can evade two Sidewinder missiles, one after another? ''It's Buck!''" and orders his fighters into combat.

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* LivingLegend: Buck. There are many examples, but probably the best one comes towards the beginning of "Tonnerre Sur La Cordillère." Buck is fleeing for his life on a stolen F-18, with enemy fighters in hot pursuit. He has no way of positively identifying himself for his aircraft carrier, and the officers on the bridge are hesitant to intervene in a fight between foreign fighters without confirmation that one of their own is involved. This lasts until Buck is seen evading the first enemy volley, at which point the admiral comments "do you know a lot of pilots who can evade two Sidewinder missiles, one after another? ''It's ''That's Buck!''" and orders his fighters into combat.



** ... ''most'' of the time. However, there were a couple of times when he was shot down, presumed dead, and instead managed to not only hold his own but obtain information about the enemy that turns out to be crucial to defeating them. Sonny may be accident-prone and socially awkward in civilian life, but in a war zone, he's still someone you want at your side. (Mostly).

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** ... ''most'' of the time. However, there were a couple of times when he was shot down, presumed dead, and instead managed to not only hold his own but obtain information about the enemy that turns out to be crucial to defeating them. Sonny may be accident-prone and socially awkward in civilian life, but in a war zone, he's still someone you want at your side. (Mostly).



* RippedFromTheHeadlines: particularly common in the early stories (where the adventures were set during World War Two, Arab oil conflicts, the Korean War) and in later ones (the Yugoslav wars, Central American drug wars, the war in Afghanistan). In between the two, the authors took a long hiatus from real-life conflicts, including the Cold War itself, to avoid irritating French censors. On a less political note, however, the stories always followed the evolution of real life aerospace technology very closely, such as the development of jet technology, the early space program, the SR-71, stealth technology, etc.

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* RippedFromTheHeadlines: particularly common in the early stories (where the adventures were set during World War Two, Arab oil conflicts, the Korean War) and in later ones (the Yugoslav wars, Central American drug wars, the war in Afghanistan). In between the two, the authors took a long hiatus from real-life conflicts, including the Cold War itself, to avoid irritating French censors.being censored. On a less political note, however, the stories always followed the evolution of real life aerospace technology very closely, such as the development of jet technology, the early space program, the SR-71, stealth technology, etc.

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