Follow TV Tropes

Following

History ComicStrip / MallardFillmore

Go To



Tinsley wrote and drew the strip himself until late 2019. While no stranger to controversy given his volatile opinions, a particularly aggressive strip aimed at Rep. Ihlan Omar [[https://www.dailycartoonist.com/index.php/2019/08/31/san-diego-union-tribune-drops-mallard-fillmore-hate-speech/ got the strip dropped from several papers]] in late 2019. The strip went on a short hiatus, running four months of reruns, before [[https://www.comicskingdom.com/trending/blog/2020/04/08/an-interview-with-guest-cartoonist-loren-fishman Loren Fishman]] took over the production of the strip in March 2020. While still credited as a guest artist, it's unclear if Tinsley is still involved, in what capacity, whether he voluntarily left, and if he will ever return.

to:

Tinsley wrote and drew the strip himself until late 2019. While no stranger to controversy given his volatile opinions, a particularly aggressive strip aimed at Rep. Ihlan Ilhan Omar [[https://www.dailycartoonist.com/index.php/2019/08/31/san-diego-union-tribune-drops-mallard-fillmore-hate-speech/ got the strip dropped from several papers]] in late 2019. The strip went on a short hiatus, running four months of reruns, before [[https://www.comicskingdom.com/trending/blog/2020/04/08/an-interview-with-guest-cartoonist-loren-fishman Loren Fishman]] took over the production of the strip in March 2020. While still credited as a guest artist, it's unclear if Tinsley is still involved, in what capacity, whether he voluntarily left, and if he will ever return.


Much like compatriots ''ComicStrip/PricklyCity'' and ''Doonesbury'', the strip is ostensibly a slice of life story with a political bent. When the strip began, Mallard was hired to work at a television news station and thus his co-workers (all liberals, naturally) served as targets for the strip's conservative humor. Over time, this has largely been dropped and most of the supporting cast only appear very rarely. Today the strip just generally portrays Mallard as a mouthpiece for Tinsley's personal views, blurring the line between a straight newspaper comic strip and a series of political cartoons that all happen to feature the same character.

to:

Much like compatriots ''ComicStrip/PricklyCity'' and ''Doonesbury'', ''ComicStrip/{{Doonesbury}}'', the strip is ostensibly a slice of life story with a political bent. When the strip began, Mallard was hired to work at a television news station and thus his co-workers (all liberals, naturally) served as targets for the strip's conservative humor. Over time, this has largely been dropped and most of the supporting cast only appear very rarely. Today the strip just generally portrays Mallard as a mouthpiece for Tinsley's personal views, blurring the line between a straight newspaper comic strip and a series of political cartoons that all happen to feature the same character.


''Mallard Fillmore'', written by Bruce Tinsley and drawn by Loren Fishman, is about an anthropomorphic duck journalist and the struggles he finds in dealing with a liberal world. It started out as a non-political strip for the Charlottesville ''Daily Progress'', which had asked Tinsley to create a mascot strip for their entertainment page. After several rejections, the eponymous duck won out and the strip was launched. After Tinsley expressed his conservative political views, he found himself out of a job. He successfully sold the strip to ''The Washington Times'' in 1992 and eventually got it syndicated nationally by King Features Syndicate. Tinsley wrote and drew the strip himself until late 2019. The strip went on a short hiatus, running four months of reruns, before [[https://www.dailycartoonist.com/index.php/2020/03/23/fishman-is-new-mallard-fillmore-cartoonist/ Loren Fishman]] took over the art duties for the strip in March 2020.

to:

''Mallard Fillmore'', written created by Bruce Tinsley and drawn currently produced by Loren Fishman, is about an anthropomorphic duck journalist and the struggles he finds in dealing with a liberal world. It started out as a non-political strip for the Charlottesville ''Daily Progress'', which had asked Tinsley to create a mascot strip for their entertainment page. After several rejections, the eponymous duck won out and the strip was launched. After Tinsley expressed his conservative political views, he found himself out of a job. He successfully sold the strip to ''The Washington Times'' in 1992 and eventually got it syndicated nationally by King Features Syndicate. Tinsley wrote and drew the strip himself until late 2019. The strip went on a short hiatus, running four months of reruns, before [[https://www.dailycartoonist.com/index.php/2020/03/23/fishman-is-new-mallard-fillmore-cartoonist/ Loren Fishman]] took over the art duties for the strip in March 2020.\n


Added DiffLines:

Tinsley wrote and drew the strip himself until late 2019. While no stranger to controversy given his volatile opinions, a particularly aggressive strip aimed at Rep. Ihlan Omar [[https://www.dailycartoonist.com/index.php/2019/08/31/san-diego-union-tribune-drops-mallard-fillmore-hate-speech/ got the strip dropped from several papers]] in late 2019. The strip went on a short hiatus, running four months of reruns, before [[https://www.comicskingdom.com/trending/blog/2020/04/08/an-interview-with-guest-cartoonist-loren-fishman Loren Fishman]] took over the production of the strip in March 2020. While still credited as a guest artist, it's unclear if Tinsley is still involved, in what capacity, whether he voluntarily left, and if he will ever return.


''Mallard Fillmore'', by Bruce Tinsley, is about an anthropomorphic duck journalist and the struggles he finds in dealing with a liberal world. It started out as a non-political strip for the Charlottesville ''Daily Progress'', which had asked Tinsley to create a mascot strip for their entertainment page. After several rejections, the eponymous duck won out and the strip was launched. After Tinsley expressed his conservative political views, he found himself out of a job. He successfully sold the strip to ''The Washington Times'' in 1992 and eventually got it syndicated nationally by King Features Syndicate.

to:

''Mallard Fillmore'', written by Bruce Tinsley, Tinsley and drawn by Loren Fishman, is about an anthropomorphic duck journalist and the struggles he finds in dealing with a liberal world. It started out as a non-political strip for the Charlottesville ''Daily Progress'', which had asked Tinsley to create a mascot strip for their entertainment page. After several rejections, the eponymous duck won out and the strip was launched. After Tinsley expressed his conservative political views, he found himself out of a job. He successfully sold the strip to ''The Washington Times'' in 1992 and eventually got it syndicated nationally by King Features Syndicate.
Syndicate. Tinsley wrote and drew the strip himself until late 2019. The strip went on a short hiatus, running four months of reruns, before [[https://www.dailycartoonist.com/index.php/2020/03/23/fishman-is-new-mallard-fillmore-cartoonist/ Loren Fishman]] took over the art duties for the strip in March 2020.



After nearly four months of reruns in late 2019, Tinsley has a new comic artist for the work in March 2020: [[https://www.dailycartoonist.com/index.php/2020/03/23/fishman-is-new-mallard-fillmore-cartoonist/ Loren Fishman]].


* AVerySpecialEpisode: Every so often Tinsley will stop being funny and do a strip delivering a serious message about something like abortion or child abuse.

to:

* AVerySpecialEpisode: VerySpecialEpisode: Every so often Tinsley will stop being funny and do a strip delivering a serious message about something like abortion or child abuse.abuse, or most recently the coronavirus.

Added DiffLines:


After nearly four months of reruns in late 2019, Tinsley has a new comic artist for the work in March 2020: [[https://www.dailycartoonist.com/index.php/2020/03/23/fishman-is-new-mallard-fillmore-cartoonist/ Loren Fishman]].


* PoliticalCorrectnessGoneMad: A frequent target of mockery.
** The strip started with Mallard going out for a job as a reporter and being declined because he's just a duck. He gets the job by pointing out that he's an "Aquatic-American".
PressHat: Perhaps the prime example. Back when he was a reporter, he kept that little note in his hat. He eventually abandoned it, yet kept the jacket.

to:

* PoliticalCorrectnessGoneMad: A frequent target of mockery.
**
mockery. The strip started with Mallard going out for a job as a reporter and being declined because he's just a duck. He gets the job by pointing out that he's an "Aquatic-American".
* PressHat: Perhaps the prime example. Back when he was a reporter, he kept that little note in his hat. He eventually abandoned it, yet kept the jacket.



** [[MissingMom While she never appeared]], Dave's ex-wife qualifies, seeing that she divorced him for naming their son after Rush Limbaugh, who is outspoken in his opposition to feminists, as well as about anti-racism efforts and gay people being open about their sexualities.

to:

** [[MissingMom While she never appeared]], Dave's ex-wife qualifies, seeing that she divorced him for naming their son after Rush Limbaugh, who is outspoken in his opposition to feminists, as well as about anti-racism efforts and gay LGBT people being open about their sexualities.

Added DiffLines:

PressHat: Perhaps the prime example. Back when he was a reporter, he kept that little note in his hat. He eventually abandoned it, yet kept the jacket.

Added DiffLines:

* PoesLaw: Tinsley has a bad habit of forgetting to explain ''why'' ideas are worthy of mockery. The result is that the only reason you know that whatever the StrawmanPolitical of the strip is saying isn't his actual opinion is the byline. This gets especially bad when he's trying to accuse the left of baseless name-calling, but all that he actually ''shows'' is a talking head saying that x is racist/sexist/fascist etc.


''Mallard Fillmore'', by Bruce Tinsley, is about an anthropomorphic duck journalist and the struggles he finds in dealing with a liberal world. It started out as a non-political strip for ''The Daily Progress'', which had asked Tinsley to create a mascot strip for their entertainment page. After several rejections, the eponymous duck won out and the strip was launched. After Tinsley expressed his conservative political views, he found himself out of a job. He successfully sold the strip to ''The Washington Times'' in 1992 and eventually got it syndicated nationally by King Features Syndicate.

to:

''Mallard Fillmore'', by Bruce Tinsley, is about an anthropomorphic duck journalist and the struggles he finds in dealing with a liberal world. It started out as a non-political strip for ''The Daily the Charlottesville ''Daily Progress'', which had asked Tinsley to create a mascot strip for their entertainment page. After several rejections, the eponymous duck won out and the strip was launched. After Tinsley expressed his conservative political views, he found himself out of a job. He successfully sold the strip to ''The Washington Times'' in 1992 and eventually got it syndicated nationally by King Features Syndicate.


* DearNegativeReader: Occasionally, Mallard addresses his complaining readership, though it's hard to say if the author is quoting actual e-mails or not.

to:

* DearNegativeReader: Occasionally, Mallard addresses his complaining readership, readership in-universe, though it's hard to say if the author is quoting actual e-mails or not.


[[caption-width-right:242:Mallard Fillmore demonstrating the premise of his comic]]

to:

[[caption-width-right:242:Mallard Fillmore demonstrating [[PoliticalCorrectnessGoneMad the premise of his comic]]comic]]]]


'''''Mallard Fillmore''''', by Bruce Tinsley, is about an anthropomorphic duck journalist and the struggles he finds in dealing with a liberal world. It started out as a non-political strip for ''The Daily Progress'', which had asked Tinsley to create a mascot strip for their entertainment page. After several rejections, the eponymous duck won out and the strip was launched. After Tinsley expressed his conservative political views, he found himself out of a job. He successfully sold the strip to ''The Washington Times'' in 1992 and eventually got it syndicated nationally by King Features Syndicate.

to:

'''''Mallard Fillmore''''', ''Mallard Fillmore'', by Bruce Tinsley, is about an anthropomorphic duck journalist and the struggles he finds in dealing with a liberal world. It started out as a non-political strip for ''The Daily Progress'', which had asked Tinsley to create a mascot strip for their entertainment page. After several rejections, the eponymous duck won out and the strip was launched. After Tinsley expressed his conservative political views, he found himself out of a job. He successfully sold the strip to ''The Washington Times'' in 1992 and eventually got it syndicated nationally by King Features Syndicate.


* AmbiguouslyJewish: Mr. Noseworthy strikes one as rather this way, what with his long nose, frizzy hair, and spouting of leftist intellectual gobbledygook.

to:

* AmbiguouslyJewish: Mr. Noseworthy strikes one as rather this way, what with his long nose, frizzy hair, and spouting of leftist intellectual gobbledygook. It's a little bit worrying, acrually, especially considering he's the boss of our hero, who works in the media...



** [[MissingMom While she never appeared]], Dave's ex-wife qualifies, seeing that she divorced him for naming their son after Rush Limbaugh, who is outspoken in his opposition to feminists.

to:

** [[MissingMom While she never appeared]], Dave's ex-wife qualifies, seeing that she divorced him for naming their son after Rush Limbaugh, who is outspoken in his opposition to feminists.feminists, as well as about anti-racism efforts and gay people being open about their sexualities.


* AmbiguouslyJewish: Mr. Noseworthy strikes one as rather this way, what with his long nose, frizzy hair, and spouting of leftist intellectual gobbledygook. (Then again, maybe the frizzed hair is just supposed to identify him as a BourgeoisBohemian, and the nose as a sign of superciliousness.)

to:

* AmbiguouslyJewish: Mr. Noseworthy strikes one as rather this way, what with his long nose, frizzy hair, and spouting of leftist intellectual gobbledygook. (Then again, maybe the frizzed hair is just supposed to identify him as a BourgeoisBohemian, and the nose as a sign of superciliousness.)

Showing 15 edit(s) of 49

Top

How well does it match the trope?

Example of:

/

Media sources:

/

Report