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The stories and illustrations pay homage to many of the major periods and styles of Batman and interpretations of his character and relationships. After full stories from Alfred and [[ComicBook/{{Catwoman}} Selina Kyle]], the book then gives us only glimpses of those told by other characters. One thing known is that all of the stories conflict with each other. For example, ComicBook/TheJoker's story has him killing Batman in a scene very reminiscent of ''ComicBook/TheKillingJoke'', Clayfaces has him sacrificing himself in order to save Clayface, and Franchise/{{Superman}}'s has Bruce insisting that Clark take him into certain death, so that he can capture the villain's attention and divert them from killing innocents.

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The stories and illustrations pay homage to many of the major periods and styles of Batman and interpretations of his character and relationships. After full stories from Alfred and [[ComicBook/{{Catwoman}} Selina Kyle]], the book then gives us only glimpses of those told by other characters. One thing known is that all of the stories conflict with each other. For example, ComicBook/TheJoker's story has him killing Batman in a scene very reminiscent of ''ComicBook/TheKillingJoke'', Clayfaces Clayface's has him sacrificing himself in order to save Clayface, and Franchise/{{Superman}}'s has Bruce insisting that Clark take him into certain death, so that he can capture the villain's attention and divert them from killing innocents.


"Whatever Happened to the Caped Crusader?" is a 2009 two-part Franchise/{{Batman}} story written by Creator/NeilGaiman and illustrated by Andy Kubert. It was to be the "last" Batman story after the character's death in ''ComicBook/BatmanRIP'' and ''ComicBook/FinalCrisis'', ending as a summation of the Batman myth and a meditation on his character and its various interpretations.

to:

"Whatever Happened to the Caped Crusader?" is a 2009 two-part Franchise/{{Batman}} story written by Creator/NeilGaiman and illustrated by Andy Kubert. It was to be the "last" Batman story after the character's death in ''ComicBook/BatmanRIP'' ''[[ComicBook/BatmanGrantMorrison Batman RIP]]'' and ''ComicBook/FinalCrisis'', ending as a summation of the Batman myth and a meditation on his character and its various interpretations.



The stories and illustrations pay homage to many of the major periods and styles of Batman and interpretations of his character and relationships. After full stories from Alfred and [[Comicbook/{{Catwoman}} Selina Kyle]], the book then gives us only glimpses of those told by other characters. One thing known is that all of the stories conflict with each other. For example, ComicBook/TheJoker's story has him killing Batman in a scene very reminiscent of ''ComicBook/TheKillingJoke'', Clayfaces has him sacrificing himself in order to save Clayface, and Franchise/{{Superman}}'s has Bruce insisting that Clark take him into certain death, so that he can capture the villain's attention and divert them from killing innocents.

to:

The stories and illustrations pay homage to many of the major periods and styles of Batman and interpretations of his character and relationships. After full stories from Alfred and [[Comicbook/{{Catwoman}} [[ComicBook/{{Catwoman}} Selina Kyle]], the book then gives us only glimpses of those told by other characters. One thing known is that all of the stories conflict with each other. For example, ComicBook/TheJoker's story has him killing Batman in a scene very reminiscent of ''ComicBook/TheKillingJoke'', Clayfaces has him sacrificing himself in order to save Clayface, and Franchise/{{Superman}}'s has Bruce insisting that Clark take him into certain death, so that he can capture the villain's attention and divert them from killing innocents.

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* WhatYouAreInTheDark: In "A Gentleman's Gentleman's Tale", [[spoiler:Bruce, after learning his entire superhero career had been a lie on Alfred's part, still goes out to fight a dangerously LostInCharacter Riddler because it's the right thing to do.]]


The stories and illustrations pay homage to many of the major periods and styles of Batman and interpretations of his character and relationships. After full stories from Alfred and [[Comicbook/{{Catwoman}} Selina Kyle]], the book then gives us only glimpses of those told by other characters. One thing known is that all of the stories conflict with each other. For example, ComicBook/TheJoker's story has him killing Batman in a scene very reminiscent of ''ComicBook/TheKillingJoke'', ComicBook/{{Clayface}}'s has him sacrificing himself in order to save Clayface, and Franchise/{{Superman}}'s has Bruce insisting that Clark take him into certain death, so that he can capture the villain's attention and divert them from killing innocents.

to:

The stories and illustrations pay homage to many of the major periods and styles of Batman and interpretations of his character and relationships. After full stories from Alfred and [[Comicbook/{{Catwoman}} Selina Kyle]], the book then gives us only glimpses of those told by other characters. One thing known is that all of the stories conflict with each other. For example, ComicBook/TheJoker's story has him killing Batman in a scene very reminiscent of ''ComicBook/TheKillingJoke'', ComicBook/{{Clayface}}'s Clayfaces has him sacrificing himself in order to save Clayface, and Franchise/{{Superman}}'s has Bruce insisting that Clark take him into certain death, so that he can capture the villain's attention and divert them from killing innocents.


The stories and illustrations pay homage to many of the major periods and styles of Batman and interpretations of his character and relationships. After full stories from Alfred and [[Comicbook/{{Catwoman}} Selina Kyle]], the book then gives us only glimpses of those told by other characters. One thing known is that all of the stories conflict with each other. For example, ComicBook/TheJoker's story has him killing Batman in a scene very reminiscent of ''ComicBook/TheKillingJoke'', Clayface's has him sacrificing himself in order to save Clayface, and Franchise/{{Superman}}'s has Bruce insisting that Clark take him into certain death, so that he can capture the villain's attention and divert them from killing innocents.

to:

The stories and illustrations pay homage to many of the major periods and styles of Batman and interpretations of his character and relationships. After full stories from Alfred and [[Comicbook/{{Catwoman}} Selina Kyle]], the book then gives us only glimpses of those told by other characters. One thing known is that all of the stories conflict with each other. For example, ComicBook/TheJoker's story has him killing Batman in a scene very reminiscent of ''ComicBook/TheKillingJoke'', Clayface's ComicBook/{{Clayface}}'s has him sacrificing himself in order to save Clayface, and Franchise/{{Superman}}'s has Bruce insisting that Clark take him into certain death, so that he can capture the villain's attention and divert them from killing innocents.



* AbsurdlyHighStakesGame: Two-Face challenges the kid who offers to watch his car to a coin flip with the latter's life on the line.

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* AbsurdlyHighStakesGame: Two-Face ComicBook/TwoFace challenges the kid who offers to watch his car to a coin flip with the latter's life on the line.



* AntagonistInMourning: Played straight with ComicBook/TheJoker and Ra's al Ghul. Hinted to a lesser degree/possibly subverted with Clayface and Mad Hatter. (Depending on how much the former is actually moved to change by Batman's sacrifice, or if the latter actually feels the death too much).

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* AntagonistInMourning: Played straight with ComicBook/TheJoker and Ra's al Ghul.ComicBook/RasAlGhul. Hinted to a lesser degree/possibly subverted with Clayface and Mad Hatter. (Depending on how much the former is actually moved to change by Batman's sacrifice, or if the latter actually feels the death too much).


* DrawAggro: Superman recounts how he warned Batman that all his enemies have put their differences aside until they succeed in killing him. Batman responds that focusing on him will distract them from hurting anyone else, and insists on returning to Gotham City to protect it one last time.


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* DrawAggro: Superman recounts how he warned Batman that all his enemies have put their differences aside until they succeed in killing him. Batman responds that focusing on him will distract them from hurting anyone else, and insists on returning to Gotham City to protect it one last time.

Added DiffLines:

* DrawAggro: Superman recounts how he warned Batman that all his enemies have put their differences aside until they succeed in killing him. Batman responds that focusing on him will distract them from hurting anyone else, and insists on returning to Gotham City to protect it one last time.


''Whatever Happened to the Caped Crusader?'' is a 2009 two-part Franchise/{{Batman}} story written by Creator/NeilGaiman and illustrated by Andy Kubert. It was to be the "last" Batman story after the character's death in ''ComicBook/BatmanRIP'' and ''ComicBook/FinalCrisis'', ending as a summation of the Batman myth and a meditation on his character and its various interpretations.

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''Whatever "Whatever Happened to the Caped Crusader?'' Crusader?" is a 2009 two-part Franchise/{{Batman}} story written by Creator/NeilGaiman and illustrated by Andy Kubert. It was to be the "last" Batman story after the character's death in ''ComicBook/BatmanRIP'' and ''ComicBook/FinalCrisis'', ending as a summation of the Batman myth and a meditation on his character and its various interpretations.

Added DiffLines:

* GainaxEnding: [[spoiler:The point is there isn't really a definitive Batman story and the ending of Bruce's story is that he gets to redo it all over again in another universe.]]


''Whatever Happened to the Caped Crusader?'' is a 2009 two-part Franchise/{{Batman}} story written by Creator/NeilGaiman and illustrated by Andy Kubert. It was to be the 'last' Batman story after the character's death in ''ComicBook/BatmanRIP'' and ''ComicBook/FinalCrisis'' and ended up more a summation of the Batman myth and a meditation on his character and its various interpretations.

to:

''Whatever Happened to the Caped Crusader?'' is a 2009 two-part Franchise/{{Batman}} story written by Creator/NeilGaiman and illustrated by Andy Kubert. It was to be the 'last' "last" Batman story after the character's death in ''ComicBook/BatmanRIP'' and ''ComicBook/FinalCrisis'' and ended up more ''ComicBook/FinalCrisis'', ending as a summation of the Batman myth and a meditation on his character and its various interpretations.

Added DiffLines:

* SupermanStaysOutOfGotham: Superman carries Batman back to Gotham City, but doesn't save him from death, though there's no context to the story.


* SarcasmFailure: The Joker experiences this on [[spoiler: finally killing Batman]].

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* SarcasmFailure: The ''The Killing Joke'' Joker experiences this on [[spoiler: finally killing Batman]].


* ConfidenceBuildingScheme: In one storyline, Alfred Pennyworth is revealed to have orchestrated one of these on Bruce Wayne: realizing that Bruce Wayne was floundering in his efforts to play at fighting crime, [[spoiler: he convinced some of his old friends from his time on the stage to pretend to be villains, all so he could keep Bruce's self-esteem afloat and his demons at bay. He even went so far as to become the Joker in order to give Batman a real nemesis to fight. This backfires twice over: one of the actors ends up LostInCharacter and becomes the Riddler for real; then Bruce finds out about Alfred's fakery, eventually leading to a confrontation that ends in Batman being shot dead by the Riddler.]]



* {{Deconstruction}}: "The Gentleman's Gentleman's Tale" segment deconstructs the entire premise of Batman, especially ''Series/Batman1966'' by showing the weaknesses and mixed success of if someone ''really'' became a night-stalking vigilante to avenge their parents' death, and then deconstructs Batman's RoguesGallery by calling attention to their theatricality and obsession with Batman, then explainaing that [[spoiler:they were all actors hired by Alfred to give Bruce someone to fight, so he would feel fulfilled.]]

to:

* {{Deconstruction}}: "The Gentleman's Gentleman's Tale" segment deconstructs the entire premise of Batman, especially ''Series/Batman1966'' by showing the weaknesses and mixed success of if someone ''really'' became a night-stalking vigilante to avenge their parents' death, and then deconstructs Batman's RoguesGallery by calling attention to their theatricality and obsession with Batman, then explainaing explaining that [[spoiler:they were all actors hired by Alfred to give Bruce someone to fight, so he would feel fulfilled.]]


* UndyingLoyalty: Alfred, of course, in "The Gentleman's Gentleman". [[ spoiler:He's willing to play along with Bruce's fantasy of being a superhero to cope with his grief to the extent that he invents fake villains and tragedies, and he himself becomes Bruce's Moriarty by becoming the Joker himself.]]

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* UndyingLoyalty: Alfred, of course, in "The Gentleman's Gentleman". [[ spoiler:He's [[spoiler: He's willing to play along with Bruce's fantasy of being a superhero to cope with his grief to the extent that he invents fake villains and tragedies, and he himself becomes Bruce's Moriarty by becoming the Joker himself.]]


* UndyingLoyalty: Alfred, of course, in "The Gentleman's Gentleman". [[spoiler:He's willing to play along with Bruce's fantasy of being a superhero to cope with his grief to the extent that he invents fake villains and tragedies, and he himself becomes Bruce's Moriarty by becoming the Joker himself.]]

to:

* UndyingLoyalty: Alfred, of course, in "The Gentleman's Gentleman". [[spoiler:He's [[ spoiler:He's willing to play along with Bruce's fantasy of being a superhero to cope with his grief to the extent that he invents fake villains and tragedies, and he himself becomes Bruce's Moriarty by becoming the Joker himself.]]

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