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''Whatever Happened to the Caped Crusader?'' is a 2009 two-part Franchise/{{Batman}} story written by Creator/NeilGaiman and illustrated by Andy Kubert. It was to be the "last" Batman story after the character's death in ''ComicBook/BatmanRIP'' and ''ComicBook/FinalCrisis'', ending as a summation of the Batman myth and a meditation on his character and its various interpretations.

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''Whatever "Whatever Happened to the Caped Crusader?'' Crusader?" is a 2009 two-part Franchise/{{Batman}} story written by Creator/NeilGaiman and illustrated by Andy Kubert. It was to be the "last" Batman story after the character's death in ''ComicBook/BatmanRIP'' and ''ComicBook/FinalCrisis'', ending as a summation of the Batman myth and a meditation on his character and its various interpretations.

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* GainaxEnding: [[spoiler:The point is there isn't really a definitive Batman story and the ending of Bruce's story is that he gets to redo it all over again in another universe.]]


''Whatever Happened to the Caped Crusader?'' is a 2009 two-part Franchise/{{Batman}} story written by Creator/NeilGaiman and illustrated by Andy Kubert. It was to be the 'last' Batman story after the character's death in ''ComicBook/BatmanRIP'' and ''ComicBook/FinalCrisis'' and ended up more a summation of the Batman myth and a meditation on his character and its various interpretations.

to:

''Whatever Happened to the Caped Crusader?'' is a 2009 two-part Franchise/{{Batman}} story written by Creator/NeilGaiman and illustrated by Andy Kubert. It was to be the 'last' "last" Batman story after the character's death in ''ComicBook/BatmanRIP'' and ''ComicBook/FinalCrisis'' and ended up more ''ComicBook/FinalCrisis'', ending as a summation of the Batman myth and a meditation on his character and its various interpretations.

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* SupermanStaysOutOfGotham: Superman carries Batman back to Gotham City, but doesn't save him from death, though there's no context to the story.


* SarcasmFailure: The Joker experiences this on [[spoiler: finally killing Batman]].

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* SarcasmFailure: The ''The Killing Joke'' Joker experiences this on [[spoiler: finally killing Batman]].


* ConfidenceBuildingScheme: In one storyline, Alfred Pennyworth is revealed to have orchestrated one of these on Bruce Wayne: realizing that Bruce Wayne was floundering in his efforts to play at fighting crime, [[spoiler: he convinced some of his old friends from his time on the stage to pretend to be villains, all so he could keep Bruce's self-esteem afloat and his demons at bay. He even went so far as to become the Joker in order to give Batman a real nemesis to fight. This backfires twice over: one of the actors ends up LostInCharacter and becomes the Riddler for real; then Bruce finds out about Alfred's fakery, eventually leading to a confrontation that ends in Batman being shot dead by the Riddler.]]



* {{Deconstruction}}: "The Gentleman's Gentleman's Tale" segment deconstructs the entire premise of Batman, especially ''Series/Batman1966'' by showing the weaknesses and mixed success of if someone ''really'' became a night-stalking vigilante to avenge their parents' death, and then deconstructs Batman's RoguesGallery by calling attention to their theatricality and obsession with Batman, then explainaing that [[spoiler:they were all actors hired by Alfred to give Bruce someone to fight, so he would feel fulfilled.]]

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* {{Deconstruction}}: "The Gentleman's Gentleman's Tale" segment deconstructs the entire premise of Batman, especially ''Series/Batman1966'' by showing the weaknesses and mixed success of if someone ''really'' became a night-stalking vigilante to avenge their parents' death, and then deconstructs Batman's RoguesGallery by calling attention to their theatricality and obsession with Batman, then explainaing explaining that [[spoiler:they were all actors hired by Alfred to give Bruce someone to fight, so he would feel fulfilled.]]


* UndyingLoyalty: Alfred, of course, in "The Gentleman's Gentleman". [[ spoiler:He's willing to play along with Bruce's fantasy of being a superhero to cope with his grief to the extent that he invents fake villains and tragedies, and he himself becomes Bruce's Moriarty by becoming the Joker himself.]]

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* UndyingLoyalty: Alfred, of course, in "The Gentleman's Gentleman". [[ spoiler:He's [[spoiler: He's willing to play along with Bruce's fantasy of being a superhero to cope with his grief to the extent that he invents fake villains and tragedies, and he himself becomes Bruce's Moriarty by becoming the Joker himself.]]


* UndyingLoyalty: Alfred, of course, in "The Gentleman's Gentleman". [[spoiler:He's willing to play along with Bruce's fantasy of being a superhero to cope with his grief to the extent that he invents fake villains and tragedies, and he himself becomes Bruce's Moriarty by becoming the Joker himself.]]

to:

* UndyingLoyalty: Alfred, of course, in "The Gentleman's Gentleman". [[spoiler:He's [[ spoiler:He's willing to play along with Bruce's fantasy of being a superhero to cope with his grief to the extent that he invents fake villains and tragedies, and he himself becomes Bruce's Moriarty by becoming the Joker himself.]]


* {{Deconstruction}}: "The Gentleman's Gentleman's Tale" segment deconstructs the entire premise of Batman, especially ''Series/Batman1966'' by showing the weaknesses and mixed success of if someone ''really'' became a night-stalking vigilante to avenge their parents' death, and then deconstructs Batman's RoguesGallery by calling attention to their theatricality and obsession with Batman, then explainaing that [[spoiler:they were all actors hired by Alfred to give Bruce someone to fight, so he would feel fulfilled.

to:

* {{Deconstruction}}: "The Gentleman's Gentleman's Tale" segment deconstructs the entire premise of Batman, especially ''Series/Batman1966'' by showing the weaknesses and mixed success of if someone ''really'' became a night-stalking vigilante to avenge their parents' death, and then deconstructs Batman's RoguesGallery by calling attention to their theatricality and obsession with Batman, then explainaing that [[spoiler:they were all actors hired by Alfred to give Bruce someone to fight, so he would feel fulfilled. ]]

Added DiffLines:

* {{Deconstruction}}: "The Gentleman's Gentleman's Tale" segment deconstructs the entire premise of Batman, especially ''Series/Batman1966'' by showing the weaknesses and mixed success of if someone ''really'' became a night-stalking vigilante to avenge their parents' death, and then deconstructs Batman's RoguesGallery by calling attention to their theatricality and obsession with Batman, then explainaing that [[spoiler:they were all actors hired by Alfred to give Bruce someone to fight, so he would feel fulfilled.


* MassiveMultiplayerCrossover: In addition to all details and homages that come from every era of the Batman comics, the story also incorporates versions of the characters from Series/Batman1966 and Franchise/TheDCAnimatedUniverse, Franchise/{{Superman}}, and makes sly references to ComicBook/SandMan, Myth/RobinHood, and ''Literature/GoodnightMoon''.

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* MassiveMultiplayerCrossover: In addition to all details and homages that come from every era of the Batman comics, the story also incorporates versions of the characters from Series/Batman1966 and Franchise/TheDCAnimatedUniverse, the Franchise/DCAnimatedUniverse, Franchise/{{Superman}}, and makes sly references to ComicBook/SandMan, ComicBook/TheSandman, Myth/RobinHood, and ''Literature/GoodnightMoon''.


* MassiveMultiplayerCrossover: In addition to all details and homages that come from every era of the Batman comics, the story also incorporates versions of the characters from Series/Batman1966 and Franchise/TheDCAnimatedUniverse, Franchise/{{Superman}}, and makes sly references to ComicBook/{{Sandman}}, Myth/RobinHood, and ''Literature/GoodnightMoon''.

to:

* MassiveMultiplayerCrossover: In addition to all details and homages that come from every era of the Batman comics, the story also incorporates versions of the characters from Series/Batman1966 and Franchise/TheDCAnimatedUniverse, Franchise/{{Superman}}, and makes sly references to ComicBook/{{Sandman}}, ComicBook/SandMan, Myth/RobinHood, and ''Literature/GoodnightMoon''.


* MassiveMultiplayerCrossover: In addition to all details and homages that come from every era of the Batman comics, the story also incorporates versions of the characters from Series/Batman1966 and Franchise/TheDCAnimatedUniverse, Franchise/{{Superman}}, and makes sly references to ComicBook/{{Sandman}} and Myth/RobinHood.

to:

* MassiveMultiplayerCrossover: In addition to all details and homages that come from every era of the Batman comics, the story also incorporates versions of the characters from Series/Batman1966 and Franchise/TheDCAnimatedUniverse, Franchise/{{Superman}}, and makes sly references to ComicBook/{{Sandman}} ComicBook/{{Sandman}}, Myth/RobinHood, and Myth/RobinHood.''Literature/GoodnightMoon''.

Added DiffLines:

* MassiveMultiplayerCrossover: In addition to all details and homages that come from every era of the Batman comics, the story also incorporates versions of the characters from Series/Batman1966 and Franchise/TheDCAnimatedUniverse, Franchise/{{Superman}}, and makes sly references to ComicBook/{{Sandman}} and Myth/RobinHood.


* UndyingLoyalty: Alfred, of course, in "The Gentleman's Gentleman". [[spoiler:He's willing to play along with Bruce's fantasy of being a superhero to cope with his grief that he invents fake villains and tragedies, and he himself becomes Bruce's Moriarty by becoming the Joker himself.]]

to:

* UndyingLoyalty: Alfred, of course, in "The Gentleman's Gentleman". [[spoiler:He's willing to play along with Bruce's fantasy of being a superhero to cope with his grief to the extent that he invents fake villains and tragedies, and he himself becomes Bruce's Moriarty by becoming the Joker himself.]]

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