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*** As they watch a fish evolve into an ambphibian by spontaneously mutating feet from its fins. Putting aside how nonsensical that by itself is, the comic later uses this occurance to argue in favor of intelligent design, because if evolution ''was'' like the scientists said and animals only mutated in ways to help them survive, the fish wouldn't have evolved feet before there was land, therefore the fact that it did evolve feet is proof that God had "preprogrammed" their DNA to eventually evolve them from aquatic to amphibious life.

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*** As they They watch a fish in a container of water evolve into an ambphibian amphibian by spontaneously mutating feet from its fins. Putting aside how nonsensical that by itself is, the comic later uses this occurance to argue in favor of intelligent design, because if evolution ''was'' like the scientists said and animals only mutated in ways to help them survive, the fish wouldn't have evolved feet before there was land, therefore the fact that it did evolve feet is proof that God had "preprogrammed" their DNA to eventually evolve them from aquatic to amphibious life.


** ''Many'' of the religious debates.

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** ''Many'' Issues #3-5 feature pseudoscience so absurd and stupid that even calling it pseudscience is a stretch of the religious debates.term.
*** The characters repeatedly insist that God had to have created everything, or at least set it in motion, because the conditions for life to evolve on Earth are just right. Mickey points out that across billions of gallons of water across the entire planet across millions of years, sooner or later the right chemical reaction to form the first biological life would happen due to random chance. But given she is being presented as a StrawmanPolitical, the characters insist this is just too perfect to be random chance, it ''must'' be the work of God.
*** As they watch a fish evolve into an ambphibian by spontaneously mutating feet from its fins. Putting aside how nonsensical that by itself is, the comic later uses this occurance to argue in favor of intelligent design, because if evolution ''was'' like the scientists said and animals only mutated in ways to help them survive, the fish wouldn't have evolved feet before there was land, therefore the fact that it did evolve feet is proof that God had "preprogrammed" their DNA to eventually evolve them from aquatic to amphibious life.
*** Given that Jack is God, the characters ask if he could save the dinsaurs from the upcoming exinction event and the deep cold it will create by helping them to evolve to be warm-blooded, like mammals. Jack explains that mammal spines are designed to move up and down while dinosaur spines move side-to-side, and this is necessary to provide the proper skeletal structure to support the organs necessary to maintain a warm-blooded metabolism.
*** Jack explains he took the three through their journey of creation because if he had just visited them in the future and explained all this to them, they would have dismissed it, but now that they're seeing it with their own eyes, they believe it for themselves. Jack explains that it isn't enough to just hear the words of a proposition, you have to see them happening to truly understand. Lucy responds by asking "so are you saying that the only true path to truth is reading comic books?" -- Jack confirms this is exactly what he meant.
*** Scientists are decried as "not being very scientific" because they're never seen evolution happen, they've only glimpsed as a few hundred years before their time and presumed their findings are applicable to all of history.
*** Wolverine is the first human being, the first "mutant" in a sense. And he is immortal because of his status as the first human being, thus his genetic code lives on in all of humankind.



* StrawmanPolitical: Mickey turns into one in Issues #3-5. While Al and Lucy buy into Jack's talk and eagerly ask questions, Mickey tends to be the skeptic and argue against the explanations presented. She is almost always proven wrong when events play out that show Jack's explanation is accurate, even though Jack's explanations only make sense in the InsaneTrollLogic world of the comic.

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* StrawmanPolitical: Mickey turns into one in Issues #3-5. While Al and Lucy buy into Jack's talk and eagerly ask questions, Mickey tends to be the skeptic and argue against the explanations presented. She is almost always proven wrong when events play out that show Jack's explanation is accurate, even though Jack's explanations only make sense in the InsaneTrollLogic world of the comic. On other occasions her counterarguments aren't refuted at all, they're just dropped. The only time she's shown to be correct in her beliefs is when they align with what Jack says.


* AuthorTract: The entire comic can be seen as one, ''especially'' in light of the open letter at the end of Issue #6.

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* AuthorTract: The entire comic can be seen as one, ''especially'' in light of AuthorTract: Let's see: Ted Turner is a doofus, Spike Lee is the open letter at Kingpin of Crime, Radio/RushLimbaugh is a fit superhero with tons of fans, intelligent design is real with the end theory of Issue #6.evolution decried as short-sighted and stupid (not to mention Jack directly insults paleontologists), the original humans were white, there's lots of batshit insane pseudoscience to support the comic's ideas on evolution and intelligent design, and charity, racial sensitivity, vegetarianism, and political correctness are all mocked. Yeah, there's a certain political ideology being pushed here -- it should not come as a great surprise to learn that Bill Jemas is a conservative and a Roman Catholic.



* PlotHole: You can't go more than three steps without falling into one. Around issues #3-#5, the Time Machine's mechanics become a little confusing and inconsistent. The characters decide to use a bag, some water, and a pre-historic life form to check what year they're arriving at, but it's never explained how ''they're'' not aging along with it, either, and a panel ago, there's a window on the time machine, rendering their "biological clock" a little pointless. Also, they claim that the time machine does not move from the location they started from, but Al was sent into the middle of the street when he first arrived in the past and then the time machine was sent back to his living room in issue 2. And let's not forget the time machine's presence is confusing, since the first issue has Ted Turner directly state that the time machine is in the future and he has no way to send it back to Al. Also, they mention they can't set the time machine to go to a specific date, just set it fast forward, which doesn't gel with Ted Turner's uses of it where he ''did'' send Al, and others, back to a specific date.

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* PlotHole: You can't go more than three steps without falling into one. Around issues #3-#5, Increasingly as the Time Machine's mechanics become a little confusing series continues, basic logic and inconsistent. The reason break down, and things just happen, or don't happen, without explanation. As just one example, in Issue 4 the characters decide to use a bag, some water, and a pre-historic life form to check what year they're arriving at, but it's never explained how ''they're'' not aging along with it, either, and a panel ago, there's a window on the time machine, rendering their "biological clock" a little pointless. Also, they claim that the time machine does not move to go from the location they started from, dawn of creation to the Jurassic Period, but Al was sent into the middle of the street when says he first arrived in the past and then the time machine was sent back to his living room in issue 2. And let's not forget the time machine's presence is confusing, since the first issue has Ted Turner directly state that the time machine is in the future and he has no way to send it back to Al. Also, they mention they can't set the time machine to go to a specific date, just to go forward or backward. So in order to figure out when they get to the right time, they scoop up some water and take it into the time machine with them, and set it the time machine to fast forward, and inside the time machine they watch the water as the microorganisms in it evolve into a fish, an amphibian, and then a duckbilled dinosaur, which doesn't gel is able to speak English. The many, ''many'' problems with Ted Turner's uses this sequence of it where he ''did'' send Al, events should be kinda obvious, and others, back to a specific date.the talking dinosaur is not even the most glaring problem.



* StrawmanPolitical: Let's see: Ted Turner is a doofus, Spike Lee is the Kingpin of Crime, Radio/RushLimbaugh is a fit superhero with tons of fans, intelligent design is real with the theory of evolution decried as short-sighted and stupid (not to mention Jack directly insults paleontologists), the original humans were white, there's lots of batshit insane pseudoscience to support the comic's ideas on evolution and intelligent design, and charity, racial sensitivity, vegetarianism, and political correctness are all mocked. Yeah, there's a certain political ideology being pushed here.

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* StrawmanPolitical: Let's see: Ted Turner is a doofus, Spike Lee is Mickey turns into one in Issues #3-5. While Al and Lucy buy into Jack's talk and eagerly ask questions, Mickey tends to be the Kingpin of Crime, Radio/RushLimbaugh is a fit superhero with tons of fans, intelligent design is real with skeptic and argue against the theory of evolution decried as short-sighted and stupid (not to mention Jack directly insults paleontologists), explanations presented. She is almost always proven wrong when events play out that show Jack's explanation is accurate, even though Jack's explanations only make sense in the original humans were white, there's lots InsaneTrollLogic world of batshit insane pseudoscience to support the comic's ideas on evolution and intelligent design, and charity, racial sensitivity, vegetarianism, and political correctness are all mocked. Yeah, there's a certain political ideology being pushed here.comic.


* BehindTheBlack: Issue #2 attempts this when the cast and SpiderMan track down the Kingpin of Crime's lair to an abandoned bowling alley. Lucy asks him if this is really the place, and the next panel pulls out to reveal a gigantic skyscraper behind the bowling alley with "KINGPIN ENTERPRISES" on the side. It had the ''potential'' to work, had the previous panel not showed the roof of the bowling alley and above, showing that there was nothing behind it until the next panel.

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* BehindTheBlack: Issue #2 attempts this when the cast and SpiderMan ComicBook/SpiderMan track down the Kingpin of Crime's lair to an abandoned bowling alley. Lucy asks him if this is really the place, and the next panel pulls out to reveal a gigantic skyscraper behind the bowling alley with "KINGPIN ENTERPRISES" on the side. It had the ''potential'' to work, had the previous panel not showed the roof of the bowling alley and above, showing that there was nothing behind it until the next panel.


* CannotTellFictionFromReality: It is revealed that the religious debate part of this comic is not a parody; Bill Jemas fully believes all of what is being said. This including many debunked theories such as [[NinetyPercentOfYourBrain humans only using 10% brain power]], ApeShallNeverKillApe, and so on. Also much of the debate hangs on Wolverine being the first human being, who mutated from an ''otter''; backing up real-world debates about evolution and stuff by using comic book characters as evidence (and making them as weird as possible in the process...)

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* CannotTellFictionFromReality: It is revealed The more you read the series, the more obvious it becomes that the religious debate part of this comic is not a parody; Bill Jemas fully believes all of what is being said. This including many debunked theories such as [[NinetyPercentOfYourBrain humans only using 10% brain power]], ApeShallNeverKillApe, and so on. Also much of the debate hangs on Wolverine being the first human being, who mutated from an ''otter''; backing up real-world debates about evolution and stuff by using comic book characters as evidence (and making them as weird as possible in the process...)

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* ArtStyleDissonance: The comic's semi-realistic art style make the moments of ToonPhysics come off as pretty jarring.

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* HardOnSoftScience: Anthropologists and archaeologists are repeatedly mocked and ridiculed as know-it-all losers, their theories dismissed as baseless conjecture. Mind you, hard sciences like biology are also treated with hostility, but not nearly as much.


A notorious [[ShallowParody "parody"]] comic created by Creator/MarvelComics editor [[{{Cloudcuckoolander}} Bill Jemas]], as a bet between him, Ron Zimmerman and Creator/PeterDavid on who could make a better-selling comic. Known as the "U-Decide" event, Zimmerman's six-issue ''ComicBook/UltimateAdventures'' took a year and a half to come out. David's ''[[Comicbook/CaptainMarVell Captain Marvel]]'' title went on for twenty-five issues and was well-regarded. As for ''Marville'', well...

Kal-AOL Turner, son of Ted Turner from the year 5002, is transported into the present day. Believing himself to be a superhero, Kal-AOL meets up with Mickey (who nicknames him "Al") and Lucy. And crosses paths with Creator/SpikeLee and Radio/RushLimbaugh. The first books are also filled with attempts at parody and [[WhatDoYouMeanItsNotPolitical topical humor]].

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A notorious [[ShallowParody "parody"]] comic created by Creator/MarvelComics editor and vice president [[{{Cloudcuckoolander}} Bill Jemas]], as a bet between him, Ron Zimmerman Zimmerman, and Creator/PeterDavid on who could make a better-selling comic. Known as the "U-Decide" event, Zimmerman's six-issue ''ComicBook/UltimateAdventures'' took a year and a half to come out. David's ''[[Comicbook/CaptainMarVell ''[[ComicBook/CaptainMarVell Captain Marvel]]'' title went on for twenty-five issues and was well-regarded. As for ''Marville'', well...

Kal-AOL Turner, son of Ted Turner UsefulNotes/TedTurner from the year 5002, is transported into the present day. Believing himself to be a superhero, Kal-AOL meets up with Mickey (who nicknames him "Al") and Lucy. And crosses paths with Creator/SpikeLee and Radio/RushLimbaugh. The first books are also filled with attempts at parody and [[WhatDoYouMeanItsNotPolitical topical humor]].


* ArtisticLicensePaleontology: Apart from all the various inaccuracies about dinosaurs, Jemas continually refers to the Jurassic Period as "Jurassic Park". This may be a joke... but it happens so much that Jemas may actually believe that's the real name.

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* ArtisticLicensePaleontology: ArtisticLicensePaleontology:
**
Apart from all the various inaccuracies about dinosaurs, Jemas continually refers to the Jurassic Period as "Jurassic Park". This may be a joke... but it happens so much that Jemas may actually believe that's the real name.name.
** Hadrosaurs and velociraptors, aside from being drawn in an anatomically inaccurate way, are shown living at the same time as one another in the Jurassic period, which is untrue. Even more inaccurately, they are said to be inhabiting what will eventually become the northern United States, even though no dinosaurs were ever discovered to have inhabited that particular area. Furthermore, otters are shown living in the late Cretaceous period (in reality, they didn't show up until well after the dinosaurs went extinct), Al refers to pterosaurs as dinosaurs that live in the water, and Jack explains that dinosaurs can't be warm-blooded because of their spine movements.



* SomewhereAPalaeontologistIsCrying: Or laughing. Hadrosaurs and velociraptors, aside from being drawn in an anatomically inaccurate way, are shown living at the same time as one another in the Jurassic period, which is untrue. Even more inaccurately, they are said to be inhabiting what will eventually become the northern United States, even though no dinosaurs were ever discovered to have inhabited that particular area. Furthermore, otters are shown living in the late Cretaceous period (in reality, they didn't show up until well after the dinosaurs went extinct), Al refers to pterosaurs as dinosaurs that live in the water, and Jack explains that dinosaurs can't be warm-blooded because of their spine movements.


** Wolverine's portrayal in issue five is also this; the characters repeatedly call him Wolverine, and he spouts off some of Logan's catchphrases, but he doesn't look or act like Wolverine at all, and he has a completely different backstory (being the first human and having evolved from an otter - i.e. NOT Wolverine), making the resemblance an InformedAttribute at best.

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** The comic tries to satirize Batman, Iron Man, and Black Panther by portraying them as a group of psychotic, murderous assholes who openly abuse the lower classes for fun - eg, the exact opposite of their real selves. What's more, Batman here is a CaptainErsatz who is never named in-story, so he doesn't even have a name in common.
** Wolverine's portrayal in issue five is also this; the characters repeatedly call him Wolverine, and he randomly spouts off some of Logan's catchphrases, but he doesn't look or act like Wolverine at all, and he has a completely different backstory (being the first human and having evolved from an otter - i.e. NOT Wolverine), otter), making the resemblance an InformedAttribute at best.



* SomewhereAPalaeontologistIsCrying: Or laughing. Hadrosaurs and velociraptors, aside from being drawn in an anatomically inaccurate way, are shown living at the same time as one another in the Jurassic period, which is untrue. Furthermore, otters are shown living in the late Cretaceous period (in reality, they didn't show up until well after the dinosaurs went extinct), Al refers to pterosaurs as dinosaurs that live in the water, and Jack explains that dinosaurs can't be warm-blooded because of their spine movements.

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* SomewhereAPalaeontologistIsCrying: Or laughing. Hadrosaurs and velociraptors, aside from being drawn in an anatomically inaccurate way, are shown living at the same time as one another in the Jurassic period, which is untrue. Even more inaccurately, they are said to be inhabiting what will eventually become the northern United States, even though no dinosaurs were ever discovered to have inhabited that particular area. Furthermore, otters are shown living in the late Cretaceous period (in reality, they didn't show up until well after the dinosaurs went extinct), Al refers to pterosaurs as dinosaurs that live in the water, and Jack explains that dinosaurs can't be warm-blooded because of their spine movements.



* WritingAroundTheTrademarks:

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* WritingAroundTheTrademarks:WritingAroundTrademarks:


* AFormYouAreComfortableWith: God is seen by Mickey and Al in different forms, before eventually settling on a young African American.

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* AFormYouAreComfortableWith: God is seen by Mickey and Al in different forms, forms (a GrandpaGod for the former and a [[LawyerFriendlyCameo lawyer-friendly]] Superman {{expy}} for the latter), before eventually settling on a young African American.



* GenreRoulette: ShallowParody > GoingCosmic [[ContemplateOurNavels Philosophizing]] > PreHistoria Adventure/Philosophizing

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* GenreRoulette: ShallowParody > GoingCosmic [[ContemplateOurNavels Philosophizing]] > PreHistoria Adventure/PhilosophizingAdventure/Philosophizing > HowWeGotHere RecapEpisode finale with post-modern FramingDevice > [[TheLastOfTheseIsNotLikeTheOthers submission guide for now-defunct comic line]].



* InNameOnly: Issue #7 has nothing to do with the rest of the series, and is instead an advertisement and pamphlet explaining "Epic Comics" and its intention.

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* InNameOnly: InNameOnly:
**
Issue #7 has nothing to do with the rest of the series, and is instead an advertisement and pamphlet explaining "Epic Comics" and its intention.intention.
** Wolverine's portrayal in issue five is also this; the characters repeatedly call him Wolverine, and he spouts off some of Logan's catchphrases, but he doesn't look or act like Wolverine at all, and he has a completely different backstory (being the first human and having evolved from an otter - i.e. NOT Wolverine), making the resemblance an InformedAttribute at best.



* MagicalNegro: In the form of Jack, aka God.

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* MagicalNegro: In the form of [[DivineRaceLift Jack, aka God.God]].



* PreHistoria: Issues #3 to #5.

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* PreHistoria: Issues #3 to #5.#5 take place in a very messed-up iteration of prehistoric earth.



* [[RichBitch Rich Jerk]]: ComicBook/IronMan, Franchise/{{Batman}} and ComicBook/BlackPanther cameo just to be portrayed as this, not to mention Ted Turner and the protagonist of the series, Al.

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* [[RichBitch Rich Jerk]]: ComicBook/IronMan, Franchise/{{Batman}} and ComicBook/BlackPanther cameo just to be portrayed as this, not to mention Ted Turner complete assholes; Batman is a violent psychopath who attacks poor people for fun, Iron Man is casually racist and the cares nothing for his employees, and Black Panther [[PoliticalCorrectnessGoneMad cares more about stopping bad language than violent actions]]. The protagonist of the series, Al.Al, is a downplayed example, being more RichInDollarsPoorInSense.



* SkinnyDipping: Issue #3 has everyone doing that in ''prehistoric Earth''.
* SomewhereAPalaeontologistIsCrying: Or laughing. Jewish Hadrosaurs (a.k.a. Duckbills) who can talk and live in the Jurassic Era, er, Park.

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* SkinnyDipping: Issue #3 has everyone doing that getting naked and going for a swim in ''prehistoric Earth''.
* SomewhereAPalaeontologistIsCrying: Or laughing. Jewish Hadrosaurs (a.k.a. Duckbills) who can talk and live velociraptors, aside from being drawn in an anatomically inaccurate way, are shown living at the same time as one another in the Jurassic Era, er, Park.period, which is untrue. Furthermore, otters are shown living in the late Cretaceous period (in reality, they didn't show up until well after the dinosaurs went extinct), Al refers to pterosaurs as dinosaurs that live in the water, and Jack explains that dinosaurs can't be warm-blooded because of their spine movements.



* WolverinePublicity: Wolverine shows up in Issue #5, and is on the main cover of Issue #6, even though he has no part in Issue 6 at all.

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* WolverinePublicity: Wolverine ([[InNameOnly allegedly]]) shows up in Issue #5, and is on the main cover of Issue #6, even though he has no part in Issue 6 at all.


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* WritingAroundTheTrademarks:
** While Iron Man, Black Panther, Spider-Man, Punisher, and Matt Murdock appear as themselves [in appearance at least] in Issue 2, we also get an ersatz Batman who is never referred to by name, has an all-black costume with a yellow bat-symbol, and has three spikes on his cowl instead of two.
** Issue 3 has Al see God as a sort of stand-in for Superman. Despite Al's insistence that he's "a dead-ringer for the Man of Steel," there are many noteworthy visual differences: the Superman seen here wears an indigo costume with a blue cape, boots, and trunks, and his hair is choppy and spiky in contrast to the real Superman's signature spit-curl.


* TakeThatAudience: Kicks in as late as--get this--Issue #6. Worse, it's not as much as making fun of the audience, rather it's a savage indictment of American culture: the reasoning is that Al's pitch for "world peace" is rejected by the editor [[ArtistDisillusionment because audiences don't care about substance and just want more superhero comics]]. Eat your heart out, Creator/GrantMorrison.

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* TakeThatAudience: Kicks in as late as--get this--Issue #6. Worse, it's not as much as making fun of the audience, rather it's a savage indictment of American culture: the reasoning is that Al's pitch for "world peace" is rejected by the editor [[ArtistDisillusionment because audiences don't care about substance and just want more superhero comics]]. Eat your heart out, Creator/GrantMorrison. [[invoked]]


* PlotHole: You can't go more than three steps without falling into one. Around issues #3-#5, the Time Machine's mechanics become a little confusing and inconsistent. The characters decide to use a bag, some water, and a pre-historic life form to check what year they're arriving at, but it's never explained how ''they're'' not aging along with it, either, and a panel ago, there's a window on the time machine, rendering their "biological clock" a little pointless. Also, they claim that the time machine does not move from the location they started from, but Al was sent into the middle of the street when he first arrived in the past. And let's not forget the Time Machine's presence is confusing, since the first issue has Ted Turner directly state that the time machine is in the future and he has no way to send it back to Al. Also, they mention they can't set the time machine to go to a specific date, just set it fast forward, which doesn't gel with Ted Turner's uses of it where he ''did'' send Al back to a specific date.

to:

* PlotHole: You can't go more than three steps without falling into one. Around issues #3-#5, the Time Machine's mechanics become a little confusing and inconsistent. The characters decide to use a bag, some water, and a pre-historic life form to check what year they're arriving at, but it's never explained how ''they're'' not aging along with it, either, and a panel ago, there's a window on the time machine, rendering their "biological clock" a little pointless. Also, they claim that the time machine does not move from the location they started from, but Al was sent into the middle of the street when he first arrived in the past. past and then the time machine was sent back to his living room in issue 2. And let's not forget the Time Machine's time machine's presence is confusing, since the first issue has Ted Turner directly state that the time machine is in the future and he has no way to send it back to Al. Also, they mention they can't set the time machine to go to a specific date, just set it fast forward, which doesn't gel with Ted Turner's uses of it where he ''did'' send Al Al, and others, back to a specific date.



* RandomEventsPlot: A summary of the six issues goes as follows: Superman parody starring random pop cultural figures; political satire starring superheroes and pop cultural figures; the cast travels back to the dawn of creation to meet God and learn the meaning of life; the cast travels to the Jurassic age and meets talking, sapient dinosaurs; the cast discovers Wolverine is the first human being leading cave people in pre-historic times and is immortal because of his status as the first human; Al recaps the series in the framing device of pitching the story to a comic editor. Along the way the reasons for characters doing things change constantly, even in the same issue, and the writer seems to forgot plot points he made in previous issues.

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* RandomEventsPlot: A summary of the six issues goes as follows: Superman parody starring random pop cultural figures; political satire starring superheroes and pop cultural figures; the cast travels back to the dawn of creation to meet God and learn the meaning of life; the cast travels to the Jurassic age and meets talking, sapient dinosaurs; the cast discovers Wolverine is the first human being leading cave people in pre-historic times and is immortal because of his status as the first human; Al recaps the series in the framing device of pitching the story to a comic editor. Along the way the reasons for characters doing things change constantly, even in the same issue, and the writer seems to forgot forget plot points he made in previous issues.

Added DiffLines:

* AuthorTract: The entire comic can be seen as one, ''especially'' in light of the open letter at the end of Issue #6.


** Ted Turner trying to convince bystanders to save the world from a meteor shower by Tomahawk Chopping the meteorites (as mentioned in the ColonyDrop example above). One man calls him out on his, but only because it'd be offensive to Native Americans.

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** Ted Turner trying to convince bystanders to save the world from a meteor shower by Tomahawk Chopping the meteorites (as mentioned in the ColonyDrop example above). One man calls him out on his, but only because [[PoliticalCorrectnessGoneMad it'd be offensive to Native Americans.Americans]].



* RecapEpisode[=/=]PostModernism: Issue #6 is Kal pitching the events of the earlier issues to an unnamed person.

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* RecapEpisode[=/=]PostModernism: Issue #6 is Kal pitching the events of the earlier issues to an unnamed person.comic editor.



** There's a jab aimed at Jemas' competitor Creator/PeterDavid in Issue #2, when says David has ''no fans'' (while Radio/RushLimbaugh has ''tons'' of fans).

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** There's a jab aimed at Jemas' competitor Creator/PeterDavid in Issue #2, when the comic says David has ''no fans'' (while Radio/RushLimbaugh has ''tons'' of fans).fans) and portrays him as a homeless bum.



** As shown in the {{Irony}} entry, Bill Jemas is not very respectful to his competitor Peter David.

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