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* TheDogWasTheMastermind: The debut storyline strongly implies that Mike Machin, Lonnie's father, may be Anarky. The big reveal at the end shows Batman's detective abilities, when he sees through this mistake and catches Lonnie.



* TheEndIsNigh: Lonnie funnels money to several political groups he supports, and mistakenly funds a delusional cult leader who wants to stage a terrorist attack to fulfill his own prophecy of calamity. The cultist decides to waste a chunk of the money on hiring homeless people to be his paid advertisers, complete with "The End is Nigh!" sandwich boards.



* TheOnlyWayTheyWillLearn: Throughout Grant's early work on Anarky, the character took a messianic tone to justify his behavior. When Grant underwent a shift in thought, he wrote the ''Anarky'' limited series to present a new message: ends don't justify the means, and "revolutionary ''leaders''" are not revolutionary. The story ends with Anarky learning that he can't force change, but that he can help people choose it. However, this trope applies to Anarky, rather than the people he seeks to convince: he himself couldn't have learned this lesson without the events of the story.



* TechnicalPacifist: Primarily in the 1997 limited series and followed up in the 1999 ongoing. Initially presented as a more violent character in early years, Anarky was toned down for the series when Grant decided that a non-aggression principal was the most logical path an anti-authoritarian could walk. While not the final word on anarchist philosophy and the ethics of violence and revolution, this meant that Anarky used his fighting skills to fight off attacks, while instead using sabotage to undue an enemy's plans.
* TheDogWasTheMastermind: The debut storyline gave heavy suggestion that Mike Machin, Lonnie's father, may have been Anarky. The big reveal at the end shows Batman's detective abilities, when he sees through this mistake and catches Lonnie.
* TheEndIsNigh: Lonnie funnels money to several political groups he supports, and mistakenly funds a delusional cult leader who wants to stage a terrorist attack to fulfill his own prophecy of calamity. The cultist decides to waste a chunk of the money on hiring homeless people to be his paid advertisers, complete with "The End is Nigh!" sandwich boards.
* TheOnlyWayTheyWillLearn: Throughout Grant's early work on Anarky, the character took a messianic tone to justify his behavior. When Grant underwent a shift in thought, he wrote the ''Anarky'' limited series to present a new message: ends don't justify the means, and "revolutionary ''leaders''" are not revolutionary. The story ends with Anarky learning that he can't force change, but that he can help people choose it. However, this trope applies to Anarky, rather than the people he seeks to convince: he himself couldn't have learned this lesson without the events of the story.

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* TechnicalPacifist: Primarily in the 1997 limited series and followed up in the 1999 ongoing. Initially presented as a more violent character in early years, Anarky was toned down for the series when Grant decided that a non-aggression principal was the most logical path an anti-authoritarian could walk. While not the final word on anarchist philosophy and the ethics of violence and revolution, this meant that Anarky used his fighting skills to fight off attacks, while instead using sabotage to undue undo an enemy's plans.
* TheDogWasTheMastermind: The debut storyline gave heavy suggestion that Mike Machin, Lonnie's father, may have been Anarky. The big reveal at the end shows Batman's detective abilities, when he sees through this mistake and catches Lonnie.
* TheEndIsNigh: Lonnie funnels money to several political groups he supports, and mistakenly funds a delusional cult leader who wants to stage a terrorist attack to fulfill his own prophecy of calamity. The cultist decides to waste a chunk of the money on hiring homeless people to be his paid advertisers, complete with "The End is Nigh!" sandwich boards.
* TheOnlyWayTheyWillLearn: Throughout Grant's early work on Anarky, the character took a messianic tone to justify his behavior. When Grant underwent a shift in thought, he wrote the ''Anarky'' limited series to present a new message: ends don't justify the means, and "revolutionary ''leaders''" are not revolutionary. The story ends with Anarky learning that he can't force change, but that he can help people choose it. However, this trope applies to Anarky, rather than the people he seeks to convince: he himself couldn't have learned this lesson without the events of the story.
plans.


** [[TitledAfterTheSong Song titles]] were occasionally referenced as well, such as "Revolution No.9" and "Anarchy in the UK", which was cleverly changed to "Anarky in Gotham City" and "Anarky in the USA", by Grant and James Peatti, respectively.

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** [[TitledAfterTheSong Song titles]] were occasionally referenced as well, such as "Revolution "[[Music/TheBeatles Revolution]] [[Music/TheWhiteAlbum No.9" 9]]" and "Anarchy "[[Music/SexPistols Anarchy in the UK", UK]]", which was cleverly changed to "Anarky in Gotham City" and "Anarky in the USA", by Grant and James Peatti, respectively.



* StreetUrchin: Roach, a recurring character created for the 1999 "Anarky" ongoing series was a street-wise girl who lived among the other homeless of Washington DC. Given the short duration of the series, she wasn't used as often as Grant or Breyfogle wanted. She was to be included in two issues that went unpublished.

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* StreetUrchin: Roach, a recurring character created for the 1999 "Anarky" ongoing series was a street-wise streetwise girl who lived among the other homeless of Washington DC. Given the short duration of the series, she wasn't used as often as Grant or Breyfogle wanted. She was to be included in two issues that went unpublished.


* PowderKegCrowd: When Anarky encounters a gathered group of homeless men outside of a construction yard that was once their tent city, but is now in the process of being turned into a bank, the men are passing around bottles of booze to drive off the cold. None have any idea what to do next or where to go. The only thing they still have left is each other. However, it only takes one rousing speech from Anarky and his lead in hot wiring a forklift, which he crashes into the scaffolding, to turn the crowed in mourning into a full scale mob riot.

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* PowderKegCrowd: When Anarky encounters a gathered group of homeless men outside of a construction yard that was once their tent city, but is now in the process of being turned into a bank, the men are passing around bottles of booze to drive off the cold. None have any idea what to do next or where to go. The only thing they still have left is each other. However, it only takes one rousing speech RousingSpeech from Anarky and his lead in hot wiring hotwiring a forklift, which he crashes into the scaffolding, to turn the crowed crowd in mourning into a full scale mob riot.full-scale rioting mob.


* LetsYouandHimFight: a strategy employed by Anarky twice during the ''Knightfall'' story line. Recognizing his limitations, Anarky chooses not to engage with a gang too dangerous to fight and instead sends out a signal flare for Batman. When Batman sees it and approaches, Anarky throws a gas bomb at the gang to get them firing their guns at their approaching attacker, who they mistake to be Batman. Thinking a good trick will work twice, Anarky then pulls it off again to pit Batman against Scarecrow, and waits for the dust to settle so he can take them both down.

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* LetsYouandHimFight: LetsYouAndHimFight: a strategy employed by Anarky twice during the ''Knightfall'' story line. Recognizing his limitations, Anarky chooses not to engage with a gang too dangerous to fight and instead sends out a signal flare for Batman. When Batman sees it and approaches, Anarky throws a gas bomb at the gang to get them firing their guns at their approaching attacker, who they mistake to be Batman. Thinking a good trick will work twice, Anarky then pulls it off again to pit Batman against Scarecrow, and waits for the dust to settle so he can take them both down.


!''Anarky'' provides examples of the following tropes:

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!''Anarky'' !!''Anarky'' provides examples of the following tropes:


An Anarky was introduced to Comicbook/{{New 52}} in the ''Franchise/GreenLantern Corps'' ''ComicBook/BatmanZeroYear'' crossover issue. The New 52 Lonnie Machen made his debut in the ''Detective Comics'' story arc "Anarky". [[spoiler: Although he's not the Anarky in that story.]]


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An Anarky was introduced to Comicbook/{{New ComicBook/{{New 52}} in the ''Franchise/GreenLantern Corps'' ''ComicBook/BatmanZeroYear'' crossover issue. The New 52 Lonnie Machen made his debut in the ''Detective Comics'' story arc "Anarky". [[spoiler: Although he's not the Anarky in that story.]]




* ''Anarky'' (Vol.2, 1999) - Anarky relocates to Washington, D.C. to wage war against the United States government, in a financially and critically unsuccessful ongoing series published in 1999.

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* ''Anarky'' (Vol.2, 1999) - Anarky relocates to Washington, D.C. UsefulNotes/WashingtonDC to wage war against the United States government, in a financially and critically unsuccessful ongoing series published in 1999.


Anarky is a fictional character appearing in books published by DC Comics. Co-created by Alan Grant and Norm Breyfogle, he first appeared in ''Detective Comics'' #608 (November 1989), as an adversary of Franchise/{{Batman}}. Introduced as Lonnie Machin, a child prodigy with knowledge of radical philosophy and driven to overthrow governments to improve social conditions, stories revolving around Anarky often focus on political and philosophical themes.

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Anarky is a fictional character appearing in books published by DC Comics.Creator/DCComics. Co-created by Alan Grant and Norm Breyfogle, he first appeared in ''Detective Comics'' #608 (November 1989), as an adversary of Franchise/{{Batman}}. Introduced as Lonnie Machin, a child prodigy with knowledge of radical philosophy and driven to overthrow governments to improve social conditions, stories revolving around Anarky often focus on political and philosophical themes.



An Anarky was introduced to Comicbook/{{New 52}} in the ''Franchise/GreenLantern Corps'' ''Comicbook/BatmanZeroYear'' crossover issue. The New 52 Lonnie Machen made his debut in the ''Detective Comics'' story arc "Anarky". [[spoiler: Although he's not the Anarky in that story.]]


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An Anarky was introduced to Comicbook/{{New 52}} in the ''Franchise/GreenLantern Corps'' ''Comicbook/BatmanZeroYear'' ''ComicBook/BatmanZeroYear'' crossover issue. The New 52 Lonnie Machen made his debut in the ''Detective Comics'' story arc "Anarky". [[spoiler: Although he's not the Anarky in that story.]]



* "Search For a Hero": Robin faces a mysterious figure who promotes gang warfare in Batman's absence. The final story arc of ''Robin'' reintroduces Lonnie Machin as "Moneyspider" after several years of obscurity.

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* "Search For a Hero": Robin faces a mysterious figure who promotes gang warfare in Batman's absence. The final story arc of ''Robin'' ''ComicBook/{{Robin|Series}}'' reintroduces Lonnie Machin as "Moneyspider" after several years of obscurity.



* AntiVillain: Anarky has slid along the [[SlidingScaleOfAntiVillains scale of anti-villainy]] over time, starting out initially as a Type III in early incarnations, while a Type IV beginning with ''Anarky'' series. His Type IV status continued in some minor appearances during his period of obscurity and the ''Red Robin'' "Money Spider" era.

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* AntiVillain: Anarky has slid along the [[SlidingScaleOfAntiVillains scale of anti-villainy]] over time, starting out initially as a Type III in early incarnations, while a Type IV beginning with ''Anarky'' series. His Type IV status continued in some minor appearances during his period of obscurity and the ''Red Robin'' ''ComicBook/RedRobin'' "Money Spider" era.


* UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfComicBooks: Anarky was created in 1989, three years after the publication of ''Comicbook/TheDarkKnightReturns'', ''Comicbook/CrisisOnInfiniteEarths'', and only ten months after the conclusion of the ''Comicbook/ADeathInTheFamily'' story arc. With a partial inspiration in another Dark Age predecessor, ''V for Vendetta'', Anarky was an early product of the comic book Dark Ages. However, while he was originally intended to conform to the compromised, anti-hero sensibilities of the era, the early decision to not have him kill, and to make him an idealistic, rather than nihilistic figure, was enough to set him on a very different path.

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* UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfComicBooks: Anarky was created in 1989, three years after the publication of ''Comicbook/TheDarkKnightReturns'', ''Comicbook/BatmanTheDarkKnightReturns'', ''Comicbook/CrisisOnInfiniteEarths'', and only ten months after the conclusion of the ''Comicbook/ADeathInTheFamily'' story arc. With a partial inspiration in another Dark Age predecessor, ''V for Vendetta'', Anarky was an early product of the comic book Dark Ages. However, while he was originally intended to conform to the compromised, anti-hero sensibilities of the era, the early decision to not have him kill, and to make him an idealistic, rather than nihilistic figure, was enough to set him on a very different path.


** Lonnie then manages a spectacular comeback by saying that evil is a choice, and if you're ''incapable'' of good, you can't make that choice. Darkseid therefore isn't evil; he's just a thing that happens. ''That'' manages to piss the Lord of Apokalips off.

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** Lonnie then manages a spectacular comeback by saying that evil is a choice, and if you're ''incapable'' of good, you can't make that choice. Darkseid therefore isn't evil; he's just a thing that happens. ''That'' manages to piss the Lord of Apokalips off.


* BreakoutCharacter: Only used sparingly by a single author for the first few years of his existence, Anarky was suddenly launched into the big leagues when he was given his own limited series in 1997, and followed it up with a trade paperback and ongoing series in 1999.

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* BreakoutCharacter: BreakoutCharacter:
**
Only used sparingly by a single author for the first few years of his existence, Anarky was suddenly launched into the big leagues when he was given his own limited series in 1997, and followed it up with a trade paperback and ongoing series in 1999.



* CorruptPolitician: You would think an anarchist would have more of these to fight. Anarky, however, was created as a Batman antagonist rather than a fully independent character. Thus, he was never proactive in taking down corrupt politicians until he got his own series. Then he catches one trying to sell bio-weapons intelligence to Ra's al Ghul.

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* CorruptPolitician: CorruptPolitician:
**
You would think an anarchist would have more of these to fight. Anarky, however, was created as a Batman antagonist rather than a fully independent character. Thus, he was never proactive in taking down corrupt politicians until he got his own series. Then he catches one trying to sell bio-weapons intelligence to Ra's al Ghul.


* CostumesChangeYourSize: When he wears his costume, he appears as a much older man.

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* CostumesChangeYourSize: When he wears his costume, he appears as a much older man. This was originally done to conceal his identity from the reader, with Batman pulling off his mask in "Anarky in Gotham City" to reveal Lonnie peering out from beneath a framework designed to make him look over a head taller.

Added DiffLines:

** Possibly as a TakeThat to more villainous versions of the character, in "Utopia" Lonnie calls this trope "a comic book villain's idea of anarchy".



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* "Utopia": Lonnie Machin's first appearance as Anarky in the ComicBook/DCRebirth era.

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