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!!!Takeshi Suzuki
-->''"A promise is a contract and a contract is absolute."''

* AffectionateNickname: "Ken" Suzuki. He is also called Arinko for some reason.
* CombatCommentator: Has served as a commentator to other promotions like Battlarts, Hard Hit, etc.
* DoNotCallMePaul: His birth name is Ken Kanda.
* HiddenDepths: Owns a Yakitori restaurant called Ichiokuen.
* NonActionGuy: Was a sales representative in the original UWF. He was the Senior Managing Director of UWF Newborn, UWF International, and Kingdom.
* PromotedFanboy: He got his job after having been Wrestling/NobuhikoTakada's fan club director in the 1980s.


* AffirmablyEvil: Made a long career of being a polite, well spoken, intelligent, reasonable man who was more than willing to cheat or drop you straight on your head.

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* AffirmablyEvil: AffablyEvil: Made a long career of being a polite, well spoken, intelligent, reasonable man who was more than willing to cheat or drop you straight on your head.

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* AffirmablyEvil: Made a long career of being a polite, well spoken, intelligent, reasonable man who was more than willing to cheat or drop you straight on your head.


* AntiVillian: As a wrestler, he was so eloquent and well spoken that even though he referred to fans as "cretinous humanoids", fans could always plainly see his side of the story. How could defending the title in Japan on short notice against Wrestling/JumboTsuruta under a different rule-set be considered fair? Why would Wrestling/RickMartel get a title-shot before his rematch? He seldom took things personally with his opponents and always conducted himself with an air of dignity and nobility. He would also periodically feud with more vicious heels like Sheik Adnan Al-Kaissie

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* AntiVillian: AntiVillain: As a wrestler, he was so eloquent and well spoken that even though he referred to fans as "cretinous humanoids", fans could always plainly see his side of the story. How could defending the title in Japan on short notice against Wrestling/JumboTsuruta under a different rule-set be considered fair? Why would Wrestling/RickMartel get a title-shot before his rematch? He seldom took things personally with his opponents and always conducted himself with an air of dignity and nobility. He would also periodically feud with more vicious heels like Sheik Adnan Al-Kaissie

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* AntiVillian: As a wrestler, he was so eloquent and well spoken that even though he referred to fans as "cretinous humanoids", fans could always plainly see his side of the story. How could defending the title in Japan on short notice against Wrestling/JumboTsuruta under a different rule-set be considered fair? Why would Wrestling/RickMartel get a title-shot before his rematch? He seldom took things personally with his opponents and always conducted himself with an air of dignity and nobility. He would also periodically feud with more vicious heels like Sheik Adnan Al-Kaissie

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!!!Minehito Watanabe
* RedBaron: Better known as "Captain" Watanabe. He is also called Cap-chan by his fans.
* UnknownCharacter: Was a trainee at UWFI, but he never debuted and later quit to become a comedian.


* TheApprentice: To Wrestling/NobuhikoTakada, Wrestling/AkiraMaeda, and Wrestling/KiyoshiTamura.

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* TheApprentice: To Wrestling/NobuhikoTakada, Wrestling/AkiraMaeda, and Wrestling/KiyoshiTamura.Wrestling/KiyoshiTamura (and was his first U-FILE Camp trainee).



* OvershadowedByAwesome: Like Yasuhito Namekawa, he debuted in RINGS in 1998 so he never got to be a bigger star. He also debuted in UWFI in its last year and left Kingdom after the first few events.

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* OvershadowedByAwesome: Like Yasuhito Namekawa, he debuted in RINGS in 1998 so he never got to be a bigger star. He also debuted in UWFI in its last year and left Kingdom after the first few events.events so he was never a star in those promotions either.
* PurpleIsPowerful: Is known to usually wear purple coloured gear like Wrestling/NobuhikoTakada.

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* BadassGrandpa: Was 36 when he started pro wrestling.


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* CharlesAtlasSuperpower: Could pick up and suplex guys like Wrestling/BigVanVader with ease.


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* LeotardOfPower: An amateur wrestling one due to his background.


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* StoutStrength: 5ft 10 and about 260 pounds and can pick up people about twice his weight with ease.


-->-- A profile of Ueyama from a Fire Pro Wrestling user Carl CX from https://steamcommunity.com

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-->-- A profile of Ueyama from a Fire Pro Wrestling VideoGame/FireProWrestling user Carl CX CarlCX from https://steamcommunity.com


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-->''"Kenichi Yamamoto is one of the longest-tenured jobbers in mixed martial arts, has one of the worst records in mixed martial arts--and was almost the undisputed champion of the world. Yamaken's entire career was founded on his childhood love of shoot-style pioneer Akira Maeda. Watching his matches made Yamamoto train in Seidokaikan karate and, ultiamtely, join Nobuhiko Takada's UWFi, where he befriended fellow future MMA competitors Yoji Anjo and Yoshihiro Takayama as part of the Golden Cups, a triumvirate of shooters who alternated between comic promos and violent beatings. As with many, when the UWFi folded Yamamoto went a step further towards legitimacy by joining FIghting Network RINGS, and gradually, his wrestling turned into fighting. As always, it's tough to tell what of the early RINGS matches were worked. What most certainly was not worked was Yamamoto's participation at UFC 23, the second and last Ultimate Japan tournament, where he in one night outgrappled both the talented Katsuhisa Fujii and the always-tricky, future-Anderson-Silva-defeating Daiju Takase. The performance earned him the tournament crown, and with it, a shot at the UFC welterweight championship when they returned to Japan the following year, at the time held by consensus #1 Pat Miletich. It was not a competitive bout: Miletich stymied Yamamoto's attempts at striking from range, Yamamoto had no answer for Miletich's wrestling, and two minutes into the second round Miletich choked him out. It was Yamamoto's first loss after a three-fight win streak. It would set the tone for the rest of his career. Yamamoto fought across the MMA world after his UFC stint: He turned up in the short-lived Club Fight promotion, he returned to RINGS for one night only, he spent a year and a half with PRIDE, he showed up in BodogFight and he took part in Grabaka's house shows. Nearly every fight ended with Yamamoto staring up at the lights. His sole victory in the last thirteen years of his career was a 2005 knockout over the 2-3 German Reyes: Otherwise he was knocked out by everyone from Kevin Randleman to Ikuhisa Minowa to a 40 year-old Sanae Kikuta--one of only two men Kikuta was able to knock out in 31 victories. (The other was an 0-0 rookie with no MMA training.) Yamamoto tried. He was athletic, he was charismatic and he always put forth the best effort he could--it was just inevitably, heartbreakingly, never enough. He retired at 5-12-2, with only one loss going the distance. But once, just once, he had his hands on the welterweight champion of the world. Once he could have been king."''
-->-- A profile of Yamamoto from a VideoGame/FireProWrestling user CarlCX from https://steamcommunity.com

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-->''"Ueyama's fighting career started in the old, late-90s RINGS cards. It's already hard to determine how much of even the late-period RINGS revival was legit, but Ueyama managed to make it even harder with his inexplicable ability to have fights with weird, screwjob endings. His first was a 1999 run-in with mixed martial arts legend Lee Hasdell, which Ueyama lost by disqualification after inexplicably and repeatedly raking Hasdell's eyes. His karmic repayment came two months later, when Dutch heavyweight Willie Peeters fouled him with so many illegal blows that, under RINGS' system of fouls, Peeters was ruled to have been knocked out. One year later, Ueyama would meet future UFC champion Dave Menne and get utterly dominated by him--but Menne briefly forgot the rules and struck him with a closed fist, which earned him a yellow card and rendered the fight a draw. For his next trick, he managed to fight to two draws with the same fighter in one year and, somehow, also record a TKO victory over legitimate UFC veteran LaVerne Clark. It was the transition from RINGS to DEEP that best served him: While only a middling fighter outside the regional organization, within the confines of DEEP he earned the first true winning streak of his career thanks to DEEP's 2002 middleweight tournament, where he won three fights in one night and became DEEP's inaugural middleweight champion. It was the highest-profile success he'd have in his career, and within a year Pride came knocking, looking to populate their Bushido series with his momentum. Unfortunately, he ran into a mountain. When Ueyama walked out at Pride: Bushido 2 in 2004 he was 9-6-4, and his greatest fight was a corner stoppage against the 12-9 LaVerne Clark. His opponent was Sean "The Muscle Shark" Sherk, who was 22-1-1, had two tournament titles and had just a year prior almost knocked out Matt Hughes. Ueyama did not stand a chance. His second and final Pride appearance came later that year against the legendary Ikuhisa Minowa, and it's...suspicious? The fight has an inescapable feeling of pro-wrestling kayfabe hanging over it, from the camera close-ups of Kiyoshi Tamura sitting ringside as the commentators discuss Ueyama's place as a soldier in a proxy war between Minowa and Tamura, Minowa's usual aggression seems oddly tempered as he passes up ground-and-pound opportunities to trade half-applied leglocks, and despite having had competitive grappling fights with Ryan Gracie, Ricardo Almeida and even Tamura himself within the past year Minowa couldn't muster much successful offense against Ueyama, who was once controlled with ease by Dave Menne. Minowa took a split decision, and Ueyama never appeared in Pride again. He kept fighting, though--for another ten years, in fact, everywhere from K-1 Hero's to the ill-fated RINGS revival to China's Art of War FC, which gave him his own main event. Very little of it went well for him--in the last ten years of his career Ueyama went 2-10-2 (1), with one of those victories coming against Kosei Kubota, the fighter he'd drawn with twice eight years prior. He ultimately retired at 11-15-5 (1). He wrestled intermittently with Tamura's U-Style shows throughout his career, but never achieved any real fame from it. And yet, that was still enough to hold a title. Jobber or no, Ueyama successfully etched his name in the title history of one of the most enduring promotions in MMA history. And he wore shiny purple trunks. That's pretty cool."''
-->-- A profile of Ueyama from a Fire Pro Wrestling user Carl CX from https://steamcommunity.com


* BadassFamily: His son is an amateur MMA fighter.



* IKnowKarate: Also trained in the Seidokaikan before it became K-1, and later added UsefulNotes/MuayThai.

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* IKnowKarate: Also trained in the Seidokaikan before it became K-1, and later added UsefulNotes/MuayThai.UsefulNotes/MuayThai and fought in about 60 matches under those rules.

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-->''"Wanderlei Silva? He was just a neanderthal-looking Brazilian with sloppy hooks. Igor Vovchanchyn? A short dude with bad wrestling. Vitor Belfort? Lol, he was a Christian, how freaky. As you can guess, Matsui stood no chance against any of these professional unarmed killers, but it didn't stop him from going to the judges against two of them and resisting valiantly against the remnant one without an ounce of fear. He was way more worried about his visa during his King of the Cage tenure in United States than of any of these dudebros."''
-->-- Reddit user DaShoota

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* TheApprentice: To Wrestling/NobuhikoTakada.


* TheApprentice: To Wrestling/NobuhikoTakada and Wrestling/AkiraMaeda.



* RedBaron: "Yamaken" as he has the same name as a {{Yakuza}} Kumicho and founder of the Yamaken-gumi. Also "U no Hagure Okami" ("U-system's Wandering Wolf").

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* RedBaron: "Yamaken" as he has the same name as a {{Yakuza}} Kumicho and founder of the Yamaken-gumi. Also "U no Hagure Okami" ("U-system's ("U-System's Wandering Wolf").


* TheApprentice: To Wrestling/NobuhikoTakada.



* CrazyAwesome: You would have to be to do the things he does in a fight.



* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness / EstablishingCharacterMoment: His first two fights in PRIDE were long snoozefest draws with Akira Shoji and Sanae Kikuta respectively. It was his fight with Carlos Newton where he showed off how CrazyAwesome he could be.



* [[IKnowKarate I Know]] UsefulNotes/{{Judo}}: And amateur wrestling.
* ImprovFu: Unlike other shooters who were able to hold their own by striking and grappling, Matsui had not very much skills on those fields, but he was a sharp wrestler and had proficiency in improvising during his fights. If his opponent was too much for fighting the old way, he would threw dropkicks, coconut openers, running slams against the turnbuckle, piledrivers and whatnot in order to get the win.

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* EvilCounterpart: To Wrestling/KendoKashin, when he wrestled as Mr Problem wearing a modified Kendo Kashin attire and mask.
* [[IKnowKarate I Know]] UsefulNotes/{{Judo}}: And A black belt and also trained in amateur wrestling.
* ImprovFu: ImprovFu / WrestlerInAllOfUs: Unlike other shooters who were able to hold their own by striking and grappling, Matsui had not very much skills on those fields, but he was a sharp wrestler and had proficiency in improvising during his fights. If his opponent was too much for fighting the old way, he would threw dropkicks, coconut openers, running slams against the turnbuckle, piledrivers and whatnot in order to get the win.



* RedBaron: "Honoo no Grappler" ("The Flame Grappler").

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* RedBaron: "Honoo no Grappler" ("The Flame Grappler").Grappler"), "PRIDE no Kirikomi Taichō" ("PRIDE’s Raid Captain").

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