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* EvilCostumeSwitch: Following her reveal that she is working with Count Olaf, she drops her WomanInWhite clothes, she is clad in black and dark gray clothes, using black lipstick during the auction.

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* EvilCostumeSwitch: Following her reveal that she is working with Count Olaf, she drops her WomanInWhite white clothes, she is clad in black and dark gray clothes, using black lipstick during the auction.



* WomanInWhite: Dresses as this when the orphans meet her, even her hair is platinum gold nearing white. While she drops this soon after, she's back at it when they reach the Heimlich Hospital, in which she is clad in white again, dressed as a nurse.


* HeroKiller: Despite his incompetence, he is directly or indirectly responsible for more deaths on the show than even some of the more ruthless characters. He personally kills [[spoiler:Uncle Monty, Aunt Josephine and Jacques Snicket]] and causes the deaths of [[spoiler:Olivia Caliban, Larry Your-Waiter, and Dewey Denouement, as well as (possibly) the Baudelaire parents and likely several people in the Hotel Denouement fire.]]

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* HeroKiller: Despite his incompetence, he is directly or indirectly responsible for more deaths on the show than even some of the more ruthless characters. He personally kills [[spoiler:Uncle Monty, Aunt Josephine Monty and Jacques Snicket]] and causes the deaths of [[spoiler:Olivia [[spoiler:Aunt Josephine, Olivia Caliban, Larry Your-Waiter, and Dewey Denouement, as well as (possibly) the Baudelaire parents and likely several people in the Hotel Denouement fire.]]

Added DiffLines:

* EvenEvilHasStandards: Olaf is, without a doubt, one of the worst villains. However, even ''he'' ends up loathing Carmelita Spatts. And [[spoiler:of course, he attempts to save Kit from dying.]]


* AdaptationPersonalityChange: Due to this, as well as a change in general story framing, Count Olaf comes off just ever so slightly more sympathetic in this version. In the books, Olaf is unrelentingly cruel and unpleasant start to finish apart from one significant PetTheDog moment that's ''so'' far and away from the character the audience has been shown that it's bewildering. In contrast, in the tv show he displays more moments of melancholy and vulnerability while still being an undeniably terrible person: He genuinely seems to show signs of hesitation, and then remorse for [[spoiler: killing Jacques]]. Later on, he's shown to be desperate for the approval of the Man with a Beard but no Hair and the Woman with Hair but no Beard, who are revealed to have manipulated Olaf into becoming who he is today after scouting him out when he was emotionally fragile after [[spoiler: the death of his father]]. He also helplessly declares "It's all I know how to do" when the Baudelaire children attempt to plead him down from attempting to shoot [[spoiler: Dewey Denouement]].

to:

* AdaptationPersonalityChange: Due to this, as well as a change in general story framing, Count Olaf comes off just ever so slightly more sympathetic in this version. In the books, Olaf is unrelentingly cruel and unpleasant start to finish apart from one significant PetTheDog moment that's ''so'' far and away from the character the audience has been shown that it's bewildering. In contrast, in the tv show he displays more moments of melancholy and vulnerability while still being an undeniably terrible person: He genuinely seems to show signs of hesitation, and then remorse for [[spoiler: killing Jacques]]. Later on, he's shown to be desperate ''desperate'' for the approval of the Man with a Beard but no Hair and the Woman with Hair but no Beard, who are revealed to have manipulated Olaf into becoming who he is today after scouting him out when he was emotionally fragile after [[spoiler: the death of his father]]. He also helplessly declares "It's all I know how to do" when the Baudelaire children attempt to plead him down from attempting to shoot [[spoiler: Dewey Denouement]].


* AdaptationPersonalityChange: Due to this, as well as a change in general story framing, Count Olaf comes off just ever so slightly more sympathetic in this version. In the books, Olaf is unrelentingly vile and unpleasant start to finish apart from one, single, PetTheDog moment that's ''so'' out of left field that it's jarring. In contrast, in the tv show he displays more moments of melancholy and vulnerability while still being an undeniably terrible person: He genuinely seems to show signs of hesitation, and then remorse for [[spoiler: killing Jacques]]. Later on, he's shown to be desperate for the approval of the Man with a Beard but no Hair and the Woman with Hair but no Beard, who are revealed to have manipulated Olaf into becoming who he is today after scouting him out when he was emotionally fragile after [[spoiler: the death of his father]]. He also helplessly declares "It's all I know how to do" when the Baudelaire children attempt to plead him down from attempting to shoot [[spoiler: Dewey Denouement]].

to:

* AdaptationPersonalityChange: Due to this, as well as a change in general story framing, Count Olaf comes off just ever so slightly more sympathetic in this version. In the books, Olaf is unrelentingly vile cruel and unpleasant start to finish apart from one, single, one significant PetTheDog moment that's ''so'' out of left field far and away from the character the audience has been shown that it's jarring.bewildering. In contrast, in the tv show he displays more moments of melancholy and vulnerability while still being an undeniably terrible person: He genuinely seems to show signs of hesitation, and then remorse for [[spoiler: killing Jacques]]. Later on, he's shown to be desperate for the approval of the Man with a Beard but no Hair and the Woman with Hair but no Beard, who are revealed to have manipulated Olaf into becoming who he is today after scouting him out when he was emotionally fragile after [[spoiler: the death of his father]]. He also helplessly declares "It's all I know how to do" when the Baudelaire children attempt to plead him down from attempting to shoot [[spoiler: Dewey Denouement]].


* AdaptationPersonalityChange: Due to this, as well as a change in general story framing, Count Olaf comes off just ever so slightly more sympathetic in this version. In the books, Olaf is unrelentingly vile and unpleasant start to finish apart from one, single, PetTheDog moment that's ''so'' out of left field that it's jarring. In contrast, in the tv show he displays more moments of melancholy and vulnerability despite still being an undeniably terrible person: He genuinely seems to show signs of hesitation, and then remorse for [[spoiler: killing Jacques]]. Later on, he's shown to be desperate for the approval of the Man with a Beard but no Hair and the Woman with Hair but no Beard, who are revealed to have manipulated Olaf into becoming who he is today after scouting him out when he was emotionally fragile after [[spoiler: the death of his father]]. He also helplessly declares "It's all I know how to do" when the Baudelaire children attempt to plead him down from attempting to shoot [[spoiler: Dewey Denouement]].

to:

* AdaptationPersonalityChange: Due to this, as well as a change in general story framing, Count Olaf comes off just ever so slightly more sympathetic in this version. In the books, Olaf is unrelentingly vile and unpleasant start to finish apart from one, single, PetTheDog moment that's ''so'' out of left field that it's jarring. In contrast, in the tv show he displays more moments of melancholy and vulnerability despite while still being an undeniably terrible person: He genuinely seems to show signs of hesitation, and then remorse for [[spoiler: killing Jacques]]. Later on, he's shown to be desperate for the approval of the Man with a Beard but no Hair and the Woman with Hair but no Beard, who are revealed to have manipulated Olaf into becoming who he is today after scouting him out when he was emotionally fragile after [[spoiler: the death of his father]]. He also helplessly declares "It's all I know how to do" when the Baudelaire children attempt to plead him down from attempting to shoot [[spoiler: Dewey Denouement]].


* AdaptationPersonalityChange: Due to this, as well as a change in general story framing, Count Olaf comes off just ever so slightly more sympathetic in this version. In the books, Olaf is unrelentingly vile and unpleasant start to finish apart from one, single, PetTheDog moment, while in the tv show he displays more moments of melancholy and vulnerability despite still being an undeniably terrible person: He genuinely seems to show signs of hesitation, and then remorse for [[spoiler: killing Jacques]]. Later on, he's shown to be desperate for the approval of the Man with a Beard but no Hair and the Woman with Hair but no Beard, who are revealed to have manipulated Olaf into becoming who he is today after scouting him out when he was emotionally fragile after [[spoiler: the death of his father]]. He also helplessly declares "It's all I know how to do" when the Baudelaire children attempt to plead him down from attempting to shoot [[spoiler: Dewey Denouement]].

to:

* AdaptationPersonalityChange: Due to this, as well as a change in general story framing, Count Olaf comes off just ever so slightly more sympathetic in this version. In the books, Olaf is unrelentingly vile and unpleasant start to finish apart from one, single, PetTheDog moment, while moment that's ''so'' out of left field that it's jarring. In contrast, in the tv show he displays more moments of melancholy and vulnerability despite still being an undeniably terrible person: He genuinely seems to show signs of hesitation, and then remorse for [[spoiler: killing Jacques]]. Later on, he's shown to be desperate for the approval of the Man with a Beard but no Hair and the Woman with Hair but no Beard, who are revealed to have manipulated Olaf into becoming who he is today after scouting him out when he was emotionally fragile after [[spoiler: the death of his father]]. He also helplessly declares "It's all I know how to do" when the Baudelaire children attempt to plead him down from attempting to shoot [[spoiler: Dewey Denouement]].


* AdaptationPersonalityChange: Along with a change in general story framing, Count Olaf comes off just ever so slightly more sympathetic in this version. In the books, Olaf is unrelentingly vile and unpleasant start to finish apart from one, single, PetTheDog moment, while in the tv show he displays more moments of melancholy and vulnerability despite still being an undeniably terrible person: He genuinely seems to show signs of hesitation, and then remorse for [[spoiler: killing Jacques]]. Later on, he's shown to be desperate for the approval of the Man with a Beard but no Hair and the Woman with Hair but no Beard, who are revealed to have manipulated Olaf into becoming who he is today after scouting him out when he was emotionally fragile after [[spoiler: the death of his father]]. He also helplessly declares "It's all I know how to do" when the Baudelaire children attempt to plead him down from attempting to shoot [[spoiler: Dewey Denouement]].

to:

* AdaptationPersonalityChange: Along with Due to this, as well as a change in general story framing, Count Olaf comes off just ever so slightly more sympathetic in this version. In the books, Olaf is unrelentingly vile and unpleasant start to finish apart from one, single, PetTheDog moment, while in the tv show he displays more moments of melancholy and vulnerability despite still being an undeniably terrible person: He genuinely seems to show signs of hesitation, and then remorse for [[spoiler: killing Jacques]]. Later on, he's shown to be desperate for the approval of the Man with a Beard but no Hair and the Woman with Hair but no Beard, who are revealed to have manipulated Olaf into becoming who he is today after scouting him out when he was emotionally fragile after [[spoiler: the death of his father]]. He also helplessly declares "It's all I know how to do" when the Baudelaire children attempt to plead him down from attempting to shoot [[spoiler: Dewey Denouement]].


* AdaptationPersonalityChange: Along with a change in general story framing, Count Olaf comes off just ever so slightly more sympathetic in this version. In the books, Olaf is unrelentingly vile and unpleasant start to finish apart from one, single, PetTheDog moment, while in the tv show he displays more moments of melancholy and vulnerability despite still being an undeniably terrible person: He genuinely seems to show signs of hesitation, and then remorse for [[spoiler: killing Jacques]]. Later on, he's shown to be desperate for the approval of the Man with a Beard but no Hair and the Woman with Hair but no Beard, who are revealed to have manipulated Olaf into becoming who he is today after scouting him out when he was emotionally fragile after [[spoiler: the death of his father]]. He also helplessly declares "It's all I know how to do" when the Baudelaire orphans attempt to plead him down from attempting to shoot [[spoiler: Dewey Denouement]].

to:

* AdaptationPersonalityChange: Along with a change in general story framing, Count Olaf comes off just ever so slightly more sympathetic in this version. In the books, Olaf is unrelentingly vile and unpleasant start to finish apart from one, single, PetTheDog moment, while in the tv show he displays more moments of melancholy and vulnerability despite still being an undeniably terrible person: He genuinely seems to show signs of hesitation, and then remorse for [[spoiler: killing Jacques]]. Later on, he's shown to be desperate for the approval of the Man with a Beard but no Hair and the Woman with Hair but no Beard, who are revealed to have manipulated Olaf into becoming who he is today after scouting him out when he was emotionally fragile after [[spoiler: the death of his father]]. He also helplessly declares "It's all I know how to do" when the Baudelaire orphans children attempt to plead him down from attempting to shoot [[spoiler: Dewey Denouement]].


* AdaptationPersonalityChange: Along with a change in general story framing, Count Olaf comes off just ever so slightly more sympathetic in this version. In the books, Olaf is unrelentingly vile and unpleasant start to finish apart from one, single, PetTheDog moment, while in the tv show he displays more moments of melancholy and vulnerability despite still being an undeniably terrible person: He genuinely seems to show signs of hesitation, and then remorse for [[spoiler: killing Jacques]]. Later on, he's shown to be desperate for the approval of the Man with a Beard but no Hair and the Woman with Hair but no Beard, who are revealed to have manipulated Olaf into becoming who he is today after scouting him out when he was emotionally fragile after the death of his father. He also helplessly declares "It's all I know how to do" when the Baudelaire orphans attempt to plead him down from attempting to shoot [[spoiler: Dewey Denouement]].

to:

* AdaptationPersonalityChange: Along with a change in general story framing, Count Olaf comes off just ever so slightly more sympathetic in this version. In the books, Olaf is unrelentingly vile and unpleasant start to finish apart from one, single, PetTheDog moment, while in the tv show he displays more moments of melancholy and vulnerability despite still being an undeniably terrible person: He genuinely seems to show signs of hesitation, and then remorse for [[spoiler: killing Jacques]]. Later on, he's shown to be desperate for the approval of the Man with a Beard but no Hair and the Woman with Hair but no Beard, who are revealed to have manipulated Olaf into becoming who he is today after scouting him out when he was emotionally fragile after [[spoiler: the death of his father.father]]. He also helplessly declares "It's all I know how to do" when the Baudelaire orphans attempt to plead him down from attempting to shoot [[spoiler: Dewey Denouement]].


* AdaptationPersonalityChange: Along with a change in general story framing, Count Olaf comes off just ever so slightly more sympathetic in this version. In the books, Olaf is unrelentingly vile and unpleasant start to finish apart from one, single, PetTheDog moment, while in the tv show he displays more moments of melancholy and vulnerability despite still being an undeniably terrible person: He genuinely seems to show signs of hesitation, and then remorse for [[spoiler: killing Jacques]]. Later on, he's shown to be desperate for the approval of the Man with a Beard but no Hair and the Woman with Hair but no Beard, who are revealed to have manipulated Olaf into becoming who he is today after scouting him out when he was emotionally fragile after the death of his father. He also helplessly declares "It's all I know how to do" when the Baudelaire orphans attempt to plead him down from attempting to shoot Dewey Denouement.

to:

* AdaptationPersonalityChange: Along with a change in general story framing, Count Olaf comes off just ever so slightly more sympathetic in this version. In the books, Olaf is unrelentingly vile and unpleasant start to finish apart from one, single, PetTheDog moment, while in the tv show he displays more moments of melancholy and vulnerability despite still being an undeniably terrible person: He genuinely seems to show signs of hesitation, and then remorse for [[spoiler: killing Jacques]]. Later on, he's shown to be desperate for the approval of the Man with a Beard but no Hair and the Woman with Hair but no Beard, who are revealed to have manipulated Olaf into becoming who he is today after scouting him out when he was emotionally fragile after the death of his father. He also helplessly declares "It's all I know how to do" when the Baudelaire orphans attempt to plead him down from attempting to shoot [[spoiler: Dewey Denouement.Denouement]].

Added DiffLines:

* AdaptationPersonalityChange: Along with a change in general story framing, Count Olaf comes off just ever so slightly more sympathetic in this version. In the books, Olaf is unrelentingly vile and unpleasant start to finish apart from one, single, PetTheDog moment, while in the tv show he displays more moments of melancholy and vulnerability despite still being an undeniably terrible person: He genuinely seems to show signs of hesitation, and then remorse for [[spoiler: killing Jacques]]. Later on, he's shown to be desperate for the approval of the Man with a Beard but no Hair and the Woman with Hair but no Beard, who are revealed to have manipulated Olaf into becoming who he is today after scouting him out when he was emotionally fragile after the death of his father. He also helplessly declares "It's all I know how to do" when the Baudelaire orphans attempt to plead him down from attempting to shoot Dewey Denouement.

Added DiffLines:

** [[WhenHeSmiles When They Smile]]: The rare moments when they express true glee--such as when tormenting the waiter at the Anxious Clown--reveal they look quite nice when happy.


* AdaptationalAngstUpgrade: In the series version of "The Slippery Slope" they are harassed and unaccepted by the rest of Olaf's troupe which leads freaks to regretting their choice to join Olaf. In the book version of "Slippery Slope" white-faced women and the hook-handed man treat them normally( despite seeing them as freaks) and seem to fully accept them as their new colleagues. The only Olaf's henchperson to be against working with freaks, the bald man, died before freaks joined Olaf.

to:

* AdaptationalAngstUpgrade: In the series version of "The Slippery Slope" they are harassed and unaccepted by the rest of Olaf's troupe which leads the freaks to regretting regret their choice to join Olaf. In the book version of the "Slippery Slope" Slope", the white-faced women and the hook-handed man treat Fernald treated them normally( normally despite seeing them as freaks) freaks and seem seemed to fully accept them as their new colleagues. colleagues, with the women mourning their white faces, and Fernald envying Kevin for actually having hands. The only one Olaf's henchperson henchpeople to be against working with freaks, the bald man, died before the freaks joined Olaf.

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