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* CompositeCharacter: In the 2001 version, in which Belle’s role is extended, she is one of the people (unnamed in the book) whom the Ghost of Christmas Yet To Come shows to rejoice at having more time to pay off their debt.

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* CompositeCharacter: In the 2001 version, in which Belle’s role is extended, she is combined with one of the people (unnamed in the book) whom the Ghost of Christmas Yet To Come shows to rejoice at having more time to pay off their debt.debt. Unlike the unnamed woman, though, Belle isn’t willing to rejoice: CanonForeigner Dr. Lambert tries to get her to dance, but she runs away in tears.


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* AscendedExtra: Appears in the present time as well in the 2001 adaptation.


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* EvilLaugh: He and his cronies love it in the 2001 adaptation.

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* NotSoStoic: It's mostly detached and emotionless while dealing with Scrooge, but its hand is noted to start trembling when he starts begging it to tell him if his future can be changed.

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* AdaptationalSpeciesChange: Of sorts--in [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Christmas_Carol_(Shower_of_Stars) one version]], it's depicted as a mynah bird.


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* LivingShadow: In the Zemeckis version, it appears as Scrooge's shadow, symbolizing the fact that it, like the rest of the spirits, is a part of Scrooge himself.

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* AdaptationalVillainy: Happens on occasion, due to it being the most menacing of the spirits. Both of the Disney versions are probably the best examples, wherein the spirit straight up tosses Ebeneezer into ''Hell'' and in one version [[EvilLaugh laughs mockingly at him]] as he desperately tries to scramble back up.


* FatalFlaw: They each represent the horrible things that can come from cruel ignorance and selfish desires.

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* FatalFlaw: They each represent the horrible things that can come from cruel ignorance and selfish desires.deprivation.


* AmbiguousGender: Hence why it's referred to as an "it".

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* AmbiguousGender: Hence why it's referred to as an "it". Adaptations usually avert this, usually by portraying it as a woman or sometimes a little girl, but there are others that keep the trope in--the Mr. Magoo version (which also has Past appear ''after'' Present for some reason) is a good example, where the ghost is portrayed as a young child with long hair and a tunic, but there's no indication as to whether they're male or female.



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* PerpetualPoverty: What Want represents. Ignorance represents the unwillingness of others to acknowledge this.

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* CantBelieveISaidThat: A non-comedic version. Early on, he says that the poor should just die off. When the Ghost of Christmas Present repeats this statement to him, after showing Scrooge how the Cratchits are spending Christmas, he's utterly mortified.


* FateWorseThanDeath: Although he's already dead, he's forced to wear heavy chains and wander the Earth, forever haunted by the mistakes he made in his life.



* FateWorseThanDeath: Although he's already dead, he's forced to wear heavy chains and wander the Earth, forever haunted by the mistakes he made in his life.


* PensieveFlashback: What it puts Scrooge into. Lampshaded when Scrooge finally gets fed up with it.

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* PensieveFlashback: What it puts It takes Scrooge into. and presumably others back to their younger days and gets them to reflect on who they were. Lampshaded when Scrooge finally gets fed up with it.it when he gets to the more painful memories.



* BlackCloak: Wears one.

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* BlackCloak: Wears one.In just about every adaptation, it is depicted as wearing a dark cloak.



* ScareEmStraight: What it's meant to do for Scrooge.

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* ScareEmStraight: What it's meant Its purpose is to do for Scrooge.encourage change with the people it interacts with by showing them who and what their actions could affect in the future.


* {{Jerkass}}: Early on, of course.

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* %%* {{Jerkass}}: Early on, of course.



* TheScrooge: TropeNamer, of course.

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* %%* TheScrooge: TropeNamer, of course.


* EvenEvilHasStandards: He never wanted Tiny Tim to die and is disgusted at Old Joe's behavior even ''before'' he learns that it's ''his'' corpse the guy was pawning.

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* EvenEvilHasStandards: He never wanted Tiny Tim to die die, and is disgusted at Old Joe's behavior even ''before'' he learns that it's ''his'' corpse the guy was pawning.



%%* {{Jerkass}}: Early on, of course.
* JerkassRealization: Is horrified when the ghost of christmas present throws his callous comments about the poor back in his face.

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%%* * {{Jerkass}}: Early on, of course.
* JerkassRealization: Is horrified when the ghost Ghost of christmas present Christmas Present throws his callous comments about the poor back in his face.



%%* TheScrooge: TropeNamer, of course.

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%%* * TheScrooge: TropeNamer, of course.


* AscendedExtra: Appears in a more prominent role in the 2001 version and gets a backstory (her father was a coachman who drank, and Scrooge met her because she was friends with Fran).

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* AscendedExtra: Appears in a more prominent role in the 2001 version and gets a backstory (her father was a coachman who drank, and Scrooge met her because she was friends with Fran).Fan).
* CompositeCharacter: In the 2001 version, in which Belle’s role is extended, she is one of the people (unnamed in the book) whom the Ghost of Christmas Yet To Come shows to rejoice at having more time to pay off their debt.


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* RelatedInTheAdaptation: While there is no mention of Belle’s family in the book, in some adaptations, such as the 1971 version, she is Fezziwig’s daughter.


* MaternalDeathBlameTheChild: In some adaptations this is half the reason why he is so cold to his nephew Fred. The other half is because Fred so closely resembles Fan in looks and personality.

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* MaternalDeathBlameTheChild: In some adaptations this is half the reason why he is so cold to his nephew Fred. The other half is because Fred so closely resembles Fan in looks and personality. Some adaptations also give this as the reason why his own father neglected him.


* KnightOfCerebus: Rare heroic example. This character is always representative of the darkest moments in the tale and its adaptations, even the comical ones.

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