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* One really cannot discuss British English without referring to the never-printed but universally-used '''Fuck'''. This can mean almost anything, depending on context. It is an expletive, an insult; a modifier - as in when someone is said to have "fucked off" - which can convey anything from mild disapproval to stirring condemnation. It can be an imperative, as when telling someone they can fuck off (note that "go forth and multiply", a Bible quote, is a euphemism for this). It can mean damaged or worn out, beyond use; hence "Fuck, the fucking fucker is fucked!" which is incapable of translation but makes sense to a Brit [[note]]Oh no, this unpleasant item is very broken[[/note]]. It is one of very few words in the English language that can be used in every almost every sense in a single sentence; so "Fucking fuck, this fucking fucker is fucking gonna get fucking fucked." [[note]]Oh dear, this friend/mortal enemy/unknown person is about to get drunk/killed/laid[[/note]] Non-native speakers always get this word wrong or completely out if context, and are well advised not to try.

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* One really cannot discuss British English without referring to the never-printed but universally-used '''Fuck'''. This can mean almost anything, depending on context. It is an expletive, an insult; a modifier - as in when someone is said to have "fucked off" - which can convey anything from mild disapproval to stirring condemnation. It can be an imperative, as when telling someone they can fuck off (note that "go forth and multiply", a Bible quote, is a euphemism for this). It can mean damaged or worn out, beyond use; hence "Fuck, the fucking fucker is fucked!" which is incapable of translation but makes sense to a Brit [[note]]Oh no, this unpleasant item is very broken[[/note]]. It is one of very few words in the English language that can be used in every almost every sense in a single sentence; so "Fucking fuck, this fucking fucker is fucking gonna get fucking fucked." [[note]]Oh dear, dear/Brilliant/huh, this friend/mortal enemy/unknown person is about to get drunk/killed/laid[[/note]] drunk/killed/beaten up/insulted/laid[[/note]] Non-native speakers always get this word wrong or completely out if context, and are well advised not to try.


* One really cannot discuss British English without referring to the never-printed but universally-used '''Fuck'''. This can mean almost anything, depending on context. It is an expletive, an insult; a modifier - as in when someone is said to have "fucked off" - which can convey anything from mild disapproval to stirring condemnation. It can be an imperative, as when telling someone they can fuck off (note that "go forth and multiply", a Bible quote, is a euphemism for this). It can mean damaged or worn out, beyond use; hence "Fuck, the fucking fucker is fucked!" which is incapable of translation but makes sense to a Brit [[note]]Oh no, this unpleasant item is very broken[[/note]]. It is one of very few words in the English language that can be used in every almost every sense in a single sentence; so "Fucking fuck, this fucking fucker is fucking gonna get fucking fucked." [[note]]Oh dear, this friend/mortal enemy/unknown person is about to get drunk/killed/laid[[note]] Non-native speakers always get this word wrong or completely out if context, and are well advised not to try.

to:

* One really cannot discuss British English without referring to the never-printed but universally-used '''Fuck'''. This can mean almost anything, depending on context. It is an expletive, an insult; a modifier - as in when someone is said to have "fucked off" - which can convey anything from mild disapproval to stirring condemnation. It can be an imperative, as when telling someone they can fuck off (note that "go forth and multiply", a Bible quote, is a euphemism for this). It can mean damaged or worn out, beyond use; hence "Fuck, the fucking fucker is fucked!" which is incapable of translation but makes sense to a Brit [[note]]Oh no, this unpleasant item is very broken[[/note]]. It is one of very few words in the English language that can be used in every almost every sense in a single sentence; so "Fucking fuck, this fucking fucker is fucking gonna get fucking fucked." [[note]]Oh dear, this friend/mortal enemy/unknown person is about to get drunk/killed/laid[[note]] drunk/killed/laid[[/note]] Non-native speakers always get this word wrong or completely out if context, and are well advised not to try.


* One really cannot discuss British English without referring to the never-printed but universally-used '''Fuck'''. This can mean almost anything, depending on context. It is an expletive, an insult; a modifier - as in when someone is said to have "fucked off" - which can convey anything from mild disapproval to stirring condemnation. It can be an imperative, as when telling someone they can fuck off (note that "go forth and multiply", a Bible quote, is a euphemism for this). It can mean damaged or worn out, beyond use; hence "Fuck, the fucking fucker is fucked!" which is incapable of translation but makes sense to a Brit [[note]]Oh no, this unpleasant item is very broken[[/note]]. It is one of very few words in the English language that can be used in every almost every sense in a single sentence; so "Fucking fuck, this fucking fucker is fucking gonna get fucking fucked." [[note]]Oh dear, this friend/mortal enemy/unknown person is about to get drunk/killed/actually fucked[[note]] Non-native speakers always get this word wrong or completely out if context, and are well advised not to try.

to:

* One really cannot discuss British English without referring to the never-printed but universally-used '''Fuck'''. This can mean almost anything, depending on context. It is an expletive, an insult; a modifier - as in when someone is said to have "fucked off" - which can convey anything from mild disapproval to stirring condemnation. It can be an imperative, as when telling someone they can fuck off (note that "go forth and multiply", a Bible quote, is a euphemism for this). It can mean damaged or worn out, beyond use; hence "Fuck, the fucking fucker is fucked!" which is incapable of translation but makes sense to a Brit [[note]]Oh no, this unpleasant item is very broken[[/note]]. It is one of very few words in the English language that can be used in every almost every sense in a single sentence; so "Fucking fuck, this fucking fucker is fucking gonna get fucking fucked." [[note]]Oh dear, this friend/mortal enemy/unknown person is about to get drunk/killed/actually fucked[[note]] drunk/killed/laid[[note]] Non-native speakers always get this word wrong or completely out if context, and are well advised not to try.


* One really cannot discuss British English without referring to the never-printed but universally-used '''Fuck'''. This can mean almost anything, depending on context. It is an expletive, an insult; a modifier - as in when someone is said to have "fucked off" - which can convey anything from mild disapproval to stirring condemnation. It can be an imperative, as when telling someone they can fuck off (note that "go forth and multiply", a Bible quote, is a euphemism for this). It can mean damaged or worn out, beyond use; hence "Fuck, the fucking fucker is fucked!" which is incapable of translation but makes sense to a Brit [[note]]Oh no, this unpleasant item is very broken[[/note]]. Non-native speakers always get this word wrong or completely out if context, and are well advised not to try.

to:

* One really cannot discuss British English without referring to the never-printed but universally-used '''Fuck'''. This can mean almost anything, depending on context. It is an expletive, an insult; a modifier - as in when someone is said to have "fucked off" - which can convey anything from mild disapproval to stirring condemnation. It can be an imperative, as when telling someone they can fuck off (note that "go forth and multiply", a Bible quote, is a euphemism for this). It can mean damaged or worn out, beyond use; hence "Fuck, the fucking fucker is fucked!" which is incapable of translation but makes sense to a Brit [[note]]Oh no, this unpleasant item is very broken[[/note]]. It is one of very few words in the English language that can be used in every almost every sense in a single sentence; so "Fucking fuck, this fucking fucker is fucking gonna get fucking fucked." [[note]]Oh dear, this friend/mortal enemy/unknown person is about to get drunk/killed/actually fucked[[note]] Non-native speakers always get this word wrong or completely out if context, and are well advised not to try.

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* '''Fam''': Friendly form of address. Short for Family, but very rarely used for actual relatives. Literally means something more like 'mate'. Generally used as in: "Cheers, fam", but it can also be used as a substitute for the word thanks, as in: "Ah, fam" to mean "Thanks, person who just did something nice".


** As a verb, it refers to having a younger boy act as a servant to an older boy in a public school ("fagging"); one of the common jobs was lugging firewood, or faggots, as noted above. Considering the US meaning, this has even more potential for humorous confusion, especially since there's been some recent controversy regarding the practice for those exact reasons.

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** As a verb, it refers to having Another meaning was a younger boy act who acted as a servant to an older boy in a public boarding school ("fagging"); (it's also a verb, "fagging"); one of the common jobs was lugging firewood, or faggots, as noted above. Considering the US meaning, this has even more potential for humorous confusion, especially since there's been some recent controversy regarding the practice for those exact reasons.


* '''''Arse''''': the British version of "ass", as in your backside. "Ass" is sometimes used to refer to a donkey, either literally or figuratively (a foolish or 'asinine' person), often as a joke playing on the double meaning. [[TheZerothLawOfTropeExamples Shakespeare did it]] in ''A Midsummer Night's Dream'', for instance. Arse is seen as a rather rude word, and "bum", as a conjugation of "bottom", will be used often instead.

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* '''''Arse''''': the British version of "ass", as in your backside. "Ass" is sometimes used to refer to a donkey, either literally or figuratively (a foolish or 'asinine' person), often as a joke playing on the double meaning. [[TheZerothLawOfTropeExamples [[JustForFun/TheZerothLawOfTropeExamples Shakespeare did it]] in ''A Midsummer Night's Dream'', for instance. Arse is seen as a rather rude word, and "bum", as a conjugation of "bottom", will be used often instead.


* '''''Be sick''''': The throw up, to vomit.

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* '''''Be sick''''': The To throw up, to vomit.


* '''''Fortnight''''': Two weeks. Unsurprisingly derived from 'fourteen nights'. Surprisingly useful.
** People still use it in America, but it's considered formal and relegated to the world of literature.

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* '''''Fortnight''''': Two weeks. Unsurprisingly derived from 'fourteen nights'. Surprisingly useful.
**
useful. People still use it in America, but it's considered formal and relegated to the world of literature.

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* '''''Fish fingers''''': Fish sticks.

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* '''''Budgie''''': A parakeet, taken from ''budgerigar'', another name for the bird.


* ''''Fairy cake''''': A cupcake, generally one a bit smaller than you would typically see in the U.S.

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* ''''Fairy '''''Fairy cake''''': A cupcake, generally one a bit smaller than you would typically see in the U.S.


* '''Fairy cake''': A cupcake, generally one a bit smaller than you would typically see in the U.S.
* '''Fancy''': Multiple meanings:

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* '''Fairy cake''': ''''Fairy cake''''': A cupcake, generally one a bit smaller than you would typically see in the U.S.
* '''Fancy''': '''''Fancy''''': Multiple meanings:

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* '''Fairy cake''': A cupcake, generally one a bit smaller than you would typically see in the U.S.


* '''Football''': Always used to describe [[FootyRules the sport also known as Soccer]]. If you want to talk about gridiron use the phrase "American Football" while you're here or everyone will assume you're talking about our version.

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* '''Football''': Always used to describe [[FootyRules [[UsefulNotes/FootyRules the sport also known as Soccer]]. If you want to talk about gridiron use the phrase "American Football" while you're here or everyone will assume you're talking about our version.

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