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*** Also the Thrallherd prestige class gets legions of mind slaves, replenished each day, using them as suicide bombers is a neat gimmick, it isn't that great mechanically.



*** Vengeful Gaze of God causes, on average, 1067 HP of damage, to any one target within a 4 kilometer radius. Pretty big, no? Except... casting it requires a skill roll with a Difficulty Class of '''419''' (probably the highest DC ever to show up in any D&D book), which is impossible even to a wizard on level ''100''. And if you '''are''' powerful enough to cast something like this, then at your level even the weakest mooks you face probably have hit points going into the thousands. And for added fun, it causes an average 700 HP of backlash damage to ''you''.

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*** Vengeful Gaze of God causes, on average, 1067 HP of damage, to any one target within a 4 kilometer radius. Pretty big, no? Except... casting it requires a skill roll with a Difficulty Class of '''419''' (probably the highest DC ever to show up in any D&D book), which is impossible even to a normally-built wizard on level ''100''. And if you '''are''' powerful enough to cast something like this, then at your level even the weakest mooks you face probably have hit points going into the thousands. And for added fun, it causes an average 700 HP of backlash damage to ''you''.''you''.
** In general, the epic spell rules were almost completely broken and fell into this pretty hard when used as intended. The Energy seed in particular is seen as the worst, since its damage numbers just don't scale all that well, starting at a DC of 37 to just throw a 10d6 Fireball for an average of 35 damage in one turn. Even if you are [[SlapOnTheWristNuke a blaster]] at epic-level, pretty much any metamagicked low-level spell is a much better option; a Split-Ray Maximized Scorching Ray does 144 damage, and it's not even taking up an epic slot! Unfortunately, the epic spell rules are also very easy to cheese.


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** The Artificer class is an eternal resident of Tier 1. It's a magic item and crafting-focused class, allowing it to obtain powerful items very early at reduced cost, mimic pretty much any ability, and create some insanely powerful combinations. Unfortunately, it's also the game's preeminent example of DifficultButAwesome, requiring some very precise management of your money and XP and intimate familiarity with the crafting rules. It relies heavily on limited-use items like wands, meaning that every encounter drains your cash a bit where your partners can replenish their resources just by sleeping. And on top of that, one of the main rules of crafting is that it takes several days to craft even one item. In campaigns where there either isn't enough downtime or a place to easily find materials, an Artificer is forced to rely on their rather clunky and low-power Infusions. The sky may be the limit for an Artificer's power... but the floor is very, very low.


* ''TabletopGame/BloodBowl'' ogre and vampire teams look like they would be broken at a glance. Players of both types are outright [[LightningBruiser Lightning Bruisers]], but rules regarding the former's stupidity and that the latter's bloodlust mean teams composed them are doomed to fail.

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* ''TabletopGame/BloodBowl'' ogre and vampire teams look like they would be broken at a glance. Players of both types are outright [[LightningBruiser Lightning Bruisers]], but rules regarding the former's stupidity and that the latter's bloodlust mean teams composed them are doomed to fail. Goblin teams actively revel in this, with grenades, chainsaws and pogo-sticks more noted for their fun than their effectiveness.

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** Land-Air Mechs are the epitome of Awesome Impracticality in the Inner Sphere. These mechs could [[TransformingMecha transform]] between a mech mode and an aerospace fighter mode, theoretically granting it a high degree of versatility. In practice, however, this versatility requires great sacrifices in effectivity: The mech had to be light enough to be able to sustain its flight in fighter mode, could equip less ordinance than most mechs of its weight class due to the transformation servos taking up space and weight (In [=BattleTech=], a mech lives or dies by the way its loadout is spread over its max tonnage), the frame was much more fragile than in other conventional mechs of its weight class due to the components needing to shift around between modes, leaving openings and weakpoints, and [[TransformationIsAFreeAction transformation is most definitely]] [[AvertedTrope not a free action]] for them, which made these mechs most vulnerable when they were transforming. After the decline of the Star League, most Land-Air Mechs were slowly taken out of production and replaced with more practical mechs until only one factory in the entire Inner Sphere remained, continuing to produce them until the Clans, which detested the concept of these units, paid a visit and razed it to the ground. The Word of Blake tried to revive and improve on the concept during the last stages of its jihad, but the attempt at so was so short-lived it was almost inconsequential.


*** Specifically, such awesome but impractical characters are called [[Franchise/StarWars Deathstar Units]] but not for the reason you'd think; They are massively powerful, incredibly huge targets, ridiculously expensive, require a large tax on all of your resources...and have a laughably easy weak spot for all that it took to get them on the table. For most of them the weak spot happens to be the "Tarpit Unit", a large number of cheap, expendable bodies to throw at the Deathstars which will tie them up in melee for the rest of the game. For example the Imperial Guard can field 50-100 guardsmen and conscripts for the cost of the average Deathstar which would swamp the Deathstar with bodies long enough for it not to matter.

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** Chaotic also has [[https://vignette.wikia.nocookie.net/chaotic/images/b/b9/Glacier_Plains_3.jpg/revision/latest?cb=20110222195456 Glacier Plains, M'arillian Heat Cannon]], the only card in the game with an InstantWinCondition; the problem is that the condition is ''ulcer-inducing'' to actually pull off. To win the game with its effect, you have to have a whopping '''50''' Mugic counters on your field. You read that correctly: ''50''. You basically need to keep an entire army of fluidmorphers alive for at least two or three turns ''without'' playing Mugic or abilities at the very least to even get that many. And to top it off, the Heat Cannon is a Unique Location, meaning that there's only a 1 in 10 chance on any one of your turns that it'll come up, and if it shows up before you have enough counters, you can kiss your instant win goodbye.


* While [[TabletopGame/Netrunner Android: Netrunner]] may have overall less crazy card effects than its predecessor Netrunner, it has its share of big, beefy cards that are too costly to use most of the time.

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* While [[TabletopGame/Netrunner [[TabletopGame/{{Netrunner}} Android: Netrunner]] may have overall less crazy card effects than its predecessor Netrunner, it has its share of big, beefy cards that are too costly to use most of the time.


* In many historical Ancient and Medieval miniatures' games, the war elephants.


* While [[TabletopGame\Netrunner Android Netrunner]] may have overall less crazy card effects than its predecessor Netrunner, it has its share of big, beefy cards that are too costly to use most of the time.
** Government Takeover, a Weyland agenda that's grants ''six'' agenda points (either player only needs 7 to win), has an awesome 3 credit-per-click effect when scored, and is limited to one per deck. The problem is that it requires '''nine''' advancements (for reference, a 5 advancement/3 point agenda is already considered hard to score) and it very likely game-ending if runner gets lucky and happens to steal it. Not to mention you probably don't even need that awesome effect- if you didn't win immediately, you're likely extremely ahead of your opponent.

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* While [[TabletopGame\Netrunner Android [[TabletopGame/Netrunner Android: Netrunner]] may have overall less crazy card effects than its predecessor Netrunner, it has its share of big, beefy cards that are too costly to use most of the time.
** Government Takeover, a Weyland agenda that's grants worth ''six'' agenda points (either player only needs 7 (out of seven to win), has an awesome a powerful 3 credit-per-click effect when scored, and is limited to one per deck. The problem is that it requires '''nine''' 9 advancements (for reference, a to score when 5 advancement/3 point agenda is already considered hard to score) difficult, and an opponent stealing it very likely game-ending if runner gets lucky and happens to steal it. Not to mention is not only substantially easier than you probably don't even need that awesome effect- scoring it, it will almost certainly lose you the game. Its effect also might as well be blank most of the time; if you didn't immediately win immediately, when you scored it, you're very likely extremely ahead about to anyways.
** On the runner side, Monolith is the king
of your opponent.big-rig consoles. +3 Memory Units, 3 heavily discounted program installs from hand, and the option to sack uninstalled programs to prevent damage are magnificent perks, but it costs '''18 credits''', thrice as much as any console actually worth playing. Without some janky shenanigans to get it out quickly and reliably, it will almost never be worth it to amass that much money then install it normally, and it would still take more time to get the programs in hand to make that effect worthwhile.

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* While [[TabletopGame\Netrunner Android Netrunner]] may have overall less crazy card effects than its predecessor Netrunner, it has its share of big, beefy cards that are too costly to use most of the time.
** Government Takeover, a Weyland agenda that's grants ''six'' agenda points (either player only needs 7 to win), has an awesome 3 credit-per-click effect when scored, and is limited to one per deck. The problem is that it requires '''nine''' advancements (for reference, a 5 advancement/3 point agenda is already considered hard to score) and it very likely game-ending if runner gets lucky and happens to steal it. Not to mention you probably don't even need that awesome effect- if you didn't win immediately, you're likely extremely ahead of your opponent.


* In the board game ''TabletopGame/{{Risk}}'', the player who controls the whole of Asia gets a bonus of 7 battalions per turn, the largest bonus in the game. This might be useful save for the fact that you almost certainly don't need the bonus if you are capable of successfully holding Asia for a turn (with its many border provinces).

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* In the board game ''TabletopGame/{{Risk}}'', the player who controls the whole of Asia gets a bonus of 7 battalions per turn, the largest bonus in the game. This might be useful save for the fact that you almost certainly don't need the bonus if you are capable of successfully holding Asia for a turn (with with its many border provinces).provinces and the fact that it can be attacked from every other continent but South America.


** Many weapons fall under the AwesomeButImpractical category as well. Melee weapons, for example- a hatchet does great damage for most mechs, but to use it you've got to be adjacent to your opponent, and they know you're packing a hatchet. All too often the amount of tonnage devoted to packing one just ends up as dead weight that could have been used for longer ranged lasers or missiles. Another good example is the Hypervelocity Autocannon: better range than standard autocannons of the same damage potential, but they're also heavier (a real problem in a game in which weight is the main weakness of ballistic weapons relative to energy- and missile-based ones already), generate more heat, and have a 1-in-36 chance of [[MadeOfExplodium blowing up]] each time they're fired.

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** Many weapons fall under the AwesomeButImpractical Awesome, But Impractical category as well. Melee weapons, for example- a hatchet does great damage for most mechs, but to use it you've got to be adjacent to your opponent, and they know you're packing a hatchet. All too often the amount of tonnage devoted to packing one just ends up as dead weight that could have been used for longer ranged lasers or missiles. Another good example is the Hypervelocity Autocannon: better range than standard autocannons of the same damage potential, but they're also heavier (a real problem in a game in which weight is the main weakness of ballistic weapons relative to energy- and missile-based ones already), generate more heat, and have a 1-in-36 chance of [[MadeOfExplodium blowing up]] each time they're fired.


* ''TabletopGame/Warhammer 40K'' lives, breathes and shits this trope. All the time.

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* ''TabletopGame/Warhammer 40K'' ''TabletopGame/Warhammer40K'' lives, breathes and shits this trope. All the time.


* ''TabletopGame/Warhammer 40K lives, breathes and shits this trope. All the time.

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* ''TabletopGame/Warhammer 40K 40K'' lives, breathes and shits this trope. All the time.


* The Baneblade superheavy tank in ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'' looks absolutely sweet and its stats on paper are overwhelmingly awesome. After all, it's ready to unleash [[VideoGame/DawnOfWar ELEVEN BARRELS OF HELL!]] However, the sheer ridiculous points cost means that the opponent can field a much larger force, with all the dedicated anti-tank weaponry needed to make the Baneblade into eleven mountains of scrap metal.

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* The ''TabletopGame/Warhammer 40K lives, breathes and shits this trope. All the time.
**The
Baneblade superheavy tank in ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'' looks absolutely sweet and its stats on paper are overwhelmingly awesome. After all, it's ready to unleash [[VideoGame/DawnOfWar ELEVEN BARRELS OF HELL!]] However, the sheer ridiculous points cost means that the opponent can field a much larger force, with all the dedicated anti-tank weaponry needed to make the Baneblade into eleven mountains of scrap metal.


* The ''[[BritsWithBattleships HMS Dreadnought]]'' from the ''Pirates Constructible Strategy Game''; it possesses five masts and five cannons that hit on a 4+ die roll, and these cannot be eliminated until all of its masts have been shot away. The drawbacks? 26 point cost (when most games run 40 point fleets) and slower than a glacier when sent out with no crew. Giving it a captain and a helmsman will tack on 5 more points, bringing the total cost to 31 points. While it might have a chance of doing some damage, if its sunk, captured or wrecked, then half the player's fleet is gone.

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* The ''[[BritsWithBattleships ''[[UsefulNotes/BritsWithBattleships HMS Dreadnought]]'' from the ''Pirates Constructible Strategy Game''; it possesses five masts and five cannons that hit on a 4+ die roll, and these cannot be eliminated until all of its masts have been shot away. The drawbacks? 26 point cost (when most games run 40 point fleets) and slower than a glacier when sent out with no crew. Giving it a captain and a helmsman will tack on 5 more points, bringing the total cost to 31 points. While it might have a chance of doing some damage, if its sunk, captured or wrecked, then half the player's fleet is gone.

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