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* The barangay (lit. "village") of 1896 Street in General Trias, Cavite was changed from its former name of 96th Street in honour of Andres Bonifacio's stay in the town and its role in the Philippine Revolution. Villagers still occasionally refer to the street under its old name, though.

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* The barangay (lit. "village") of 1896 Street in General Trias, Cavite was changed from its former name of 96th Street in honour of Andres Bonifacio's stay in the town and its role in the Philippine Revolution. Villagers still occasionally refer to the street under its old name, though.


* In Saskatoon and other Western Canada cities, there was a touring trade Exhibition in the summer where farmers, inventors, artists, and traveling merchants would exhibit their products for other farmers and interested investors in the area, that happened to have a few rides, games, and minor attractions to entertain the women and children. Now, "The Ex" is all about the festival, rides, food, and games, and while the actual exhibition is still there, it's far from the central focus of the event.

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* In Saskatoon and other Western Canada cities, there was a touring trade Exhibition in the summer where farmers, inventors, artists, and traveling merchants would exhibit their products for other farmers and interested investors in the area, that happened to have area. The Exhibition also featured a few carnival rides, games, and minor attractions to entertain the women and children. Now, Nowadays, "The Ex" is all about the festival, rides, food, and games, and while the actual exhibition is still there, it's far from the central focus of the event.


* Although it's not completely archaic yet, in the US, you still hear drivers refer to a "service station" where they get gas. That's because, except for New Jersey, which prohibits self-service gas, very few such establishments have garage or repair facilities, much less employees who can or even will check your tires, oil, etc., while you get gas. Convenience stores long displaced them as a profit center for the chains that run more and more gasoline retail.

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* Although it's not completely archaic yet, in the US, you still hear drivers refer to a "service station" where they get gas. That's because, except for New Jersey, which prohibits self-service gas, gas (and, to some extent, Oregon), very few such establishments have garage or repair facilities, much less employees who can or even will check your tires, oil, etc., while you get gas. Convenience stores long displaced them as a profit center for the chains that run more and more gasoline retail.


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** Inverted by the United States Reports, the official case reporting series of the U.S. Supreme Court. The series was created by taking over a recently started series and renaming it; however the initial volumes remain for continuity's sake. All the cases in the first volume, and the first few in the second, are Pennsylvania appellate cases which predate the establishment of the Supreme Court.

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* Many drug and chemical companies started out with "Labs" or "Laboratories" in their names. That may have been the extent of their facilities when the founders named the companies, but many of them have grown to the point of having warehouses and offices as well that are just as important to their business."

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** It's somewhat common for US subway or light rail stops to have names that no longer make any sense, but were carried over from an existing neighborhood or building name. For instance, Boston's MBTA has one of its light rail lines (Blue) termini called Wonderland, named after a now-closed Greyhound terminal, which in turn was named after an amusement park there that closed in ''1911''. Still, the name remains.


* Since Mercurochrome, that bright red-orange antiseptic many a schoolchild from the mid-to-late 20th century would fondly remember, contained mercury compounds, it was no longer certified as safe in the States and several other countries. But the brand is still widely recognised that some companies made InNameOnly, "mercury-free" formulations using benzalkonium chloride or iodine as its active ingredient.



* Older people often refer to a refrigerator as an "icebox", even though it hasn't been a box chilled by ice brought by the iceman in many decades.

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* Older people often refer to a refrigerator as an "icebox", even though it hasn't been a box chilled by ice brought by the iceman in many decades. It still makes sense though, given how a typical refrigerator can keep ice anyway.


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* Since Mercurochrome, that bright red-orange antiseptic many a schoolchild from the mid-to-late 20th century would fondly remember, contained mercury compounds, it was no longer certified as safe in the States and several other countries. But the brand is still widely recognised that some companies made InNameOnly, "mercury-free" formulations using benzalkonium chloride or iodine as its active ingredient.


* By the same token, the presiding officer of the lower house in many [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Westminster_system Westminster-system]] legislative bodies throughout the English-speaking world (and in some outside it) is called the "Speaker" of that house. This was because the original Speakers of the English House of Commons in the 14th century also had the responsibility of communicating to the sovereign the results of the Commons' deliberations, as well as presiding over those deliberations. This slowly became less and less the case, especially by the mid-17th century as the Speaker came to be seen as more responsible to his fellow MPs than the crown. When the title was used in 1787 for the presiding officer of the U.S. House of Representatives, who had no king to have to report to, it became artifactual.

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* By the same token, the presiding officer of the lower house in many [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Westminster_system Westminster-system]] legislative bodies throughout the English-speaking world (and in some outside it) is called the "Speaker" of that house. This was because the original Speakers of the English House of Commons in the 14th century also had the responsibility of communicating to the sovereign the results of the Commons' deliberations, as well as presiding over those deliberations. This slowly became less and less the case, especially by the mid-17th century as the Speaker came to be seen as more responsible to his fellow MPs [=MPs=] than the crown. When the title was used in 1787 for the presiding officer of the U.S. House of Representatives, who had no king to have to report to, it became artifactual.

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* Britain's other major party, the Conservative Party, has as its full legal name the Conservative and Unionist Party. As of mid-2018 that last part is beginning to seem like it might be artifactual as a majority of members say in polls that they would allow Scotland to declare independence, and Northern Ireland to reunify with the Republic of Ireland, if [[GodzillaThreshold that was what it took]] to make UsefulNotes/{{Brexit}} happen.

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** Troy, New York, still proudly calls itself the Collar City, from the long-gone era when men's shirts came without a collar and many manufacturers of the button-on collars were located in the city.


* Usenet, the Internet's bulletin boards, got their name from its creators' original hope that that Usenix, the Unix users' group, would become an official sponsor.

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* Usenet, the Internet's bulletin boards, [[BatmanGambit got their name from its creators' original hope that that Usenix, the Unix users' group, would become an official sponsor.sponsor]].


* [=JavaScript=] itself is a weird example of an ArtifactTitle that was never really based in reality to begin with but instead represents an intended future that never panned out. [=JavaScript=] and Java were originally developed independently; their names are similar because their two creators got together to plan out a future of the web that involved both of them, and because they have vaguely similar syntaxes. The idea was that both could be used to craft interactive web-content, with [=JavaScript=] being intended for smaller and lighter applications while Java would be used to make more heavy duty ones. Except that only [=JavaScript=] really took off for use on the web, with Java's use on the (front-end of) the web slowly fading away, and leaving [=JavaScript=] with a name that made less and less sense.

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* [=JavaScript=] itself is a weird example of an ArtifactTitle that was never really based in reality to begin with but instead represents an intended future that never panned out. [=JavaScript=] and Java were originally developed independently; their names are similar because their the two creators companies behind them, Netscape and Sun Microsystems, got together to plan out a jointly promote them as the basis for the future of the web that involved both of them, web, and because they have vaguely similar syntaxes. The idea was that both could be used to craft interactive web-content, with [=JavaScript=] being intended for smaller and lighter applications while Java would be used to make more heavy duty ones. Except that only [=JavaScript=] really took off for use on the web, with Java's use on the (front-end of) the web slowly fading away, and leaving [=JavaScript=] with a name that made less and less sense.


* [=JavaScript=] itself is a weird example of an ArtifactTitle that was never really accurate to begin with and represents an intended future that never panned out. [=JavaScript=] and Java were originally developed independently; their names are similar because their two creators got together to plan out a future of the web that involved both of them, and because they have vaguely similar syntaxes. The idea was that both could be used to craft interactive web-content, with [=JavaScript=] being intended for smaller and lighter applications while Java would be used to make more heavy duty ones. Except that only [=JavaScript=] really took off for use on the web, with Java's use on the (front-end of) the web slowly fading away, and leaving [=JavaScript=] with a name that made less and less sense.

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* [=JavaScript=] itself is a weird example of an ArtifactTitle that was never really accurate based in reality to begin with and but instead represents an intended future that never panned out. [=JavaScript=] and Java were originally developed independently; their names are similar because their two creators got together to plan out a future of the web that involved both of them, and because they have vaguely similar syntaxes. The idea was that both could be used to craft interactive web-content, with [=JavaScript=] being intended for smaller and lighter applications while Java would be used to make more heavy duty ones. Except that only [=JavaScript=] really took off for use on the web, with Java's use on the (front-end of) the web slowly fading away, and leaving [=JavaScript=] with a name that made less and less sense.

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** There's a Datapoint Drive on the northwest side of San Antonio, Texas, named after an early computer company called [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Datapoint Datapoint Corporation]] that had its headquarters on that street. While it's not a completely defunct company, it's not the same business it was at its peak and there no longer exists a Datapoint on that street.


* The "A&M" in Texas A&M used to be short for "Agricultural and Mechanical" when it was primarily an Ag school. Now that the school's subjects have expanded to include all manner of subjects, the "A&M" isn't short for anything in particular, and is kept out of tradition.
** This trope also applies to most other universities with A&M in the title, such as Florida A&M, Alabama A&M, Prairie View A&M, Southern University and A&M College, as well as North Carolina A&T University (the T is for Technical). These schools have a different history, as all of them are historically black colleges founded when black Americans were not allowed to attend universities, and as such many of them were only supposed to provide agricultural and vocational training. Obviously, things have since changed and all of these are now bachelor's degree-granting institutions teaching all subjects.

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* The "A&M" in Texas A&M used to be short for "Agricultural and Mechanical" when it was primarily an Ag school. Now that the school's subjects have expanded to include all manner of subjects, the "A&M" isn't short for anything in particular, and is kept out of tradition.
tradition (which is very {{serious business}} here).
** This trope also applies to most other universities with A&M in the title, such as Florida A&M, Alabama A&M, Prairie View A&M, Southern University and A&M College, as well as North Carolina A&T State University (the T is for Technical).Technical) and formerly Arkansas AM&N (the N is for Normal, as in teacher training; this school is now Arkansas–Pine Bluff). These schools have a different history, as all of them are historically black colleges founded when black Americans were not allowed to attend universities, and as such many of them were only supposed to provide agricultural and vocational training. Obviously, things have since changed and all of these are now bachelor's degree-granting institutions teaching all subjects.



* Milwaukee, Wisconsin is often referred to by the nicknames "Brew City" or "The Brew" as it gained notoriety in the early 20th century as the headquarters of four of the countries' largest breweries. Nowadays, its economy is centered around health care and only one large brewery (Miller) still operates in the city, but is headquartered in Chicago.

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* Milwaukee, Wisconsin UsefulNotes/{{Milwaukee}} is often referred to by the nicknames "Brew City" or "The Brew" as it gained notoriety in the early 20th century as the headquarters of four of the countries' largest breweries. Nowadays, its economy is centered around health care and only one large brewery (Miller) still operates in the city, but is headquartered in Chicago.



* Las Vegas translates as "The Meadows".

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* Las Vegas UsefulNotes/LasVegas translates as "The Meadows".Meadows". Though it was partially justified—the original Native American settlers dug many artesian wells in the area, resulting in several large patches of greenery in an otherwise desert landscape.



** UsefulNotes/{{Pittsburgh}}, PA is widely known as "Steel City" and has a football team called the Steelers. The city is now better known for medicine and glassworks.

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** UsefulNotes/{{Pittsburgh}}, PA is widely known as "Steel City" and has a football [[UsefulNotes/NationalFootballLeague football]] team called the Steelers. The city is now better known for medicine and glassworks.



* YMCA stands for Young Men's Christian Association, and in those days, it was [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin exactly what it said on the tin]]. It was created in [[VictorianLondon 1840s London]] by a group of Christian guys who had come from the country to work in the new textile factories as a place for good, clean fun, giving an alternative to various city vices (since the only "entertainment" at the time were taverns and brothels); since period swimsuits were not compatible with pool technology of the time, the facilities had to be male only. But nowadays, it's a place where even old Hindu women can go and have fun. (Plus its notoriety as a hook-up spot for gay men, which inspired the Music/VillagePeople song). It is still an association, though.

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* YMCA stands for Young Men's Christian Association, and in those days, it was [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin exactly what it said on the tin]]. It was created in [[VictorianLondon 1840s London]] by a group of Christian guys who had come from the country to work in the new textile factories as a place for good, clean fun, giving an alternative to various city vices (since the only "entertainment" at the time were taverns and brothels); since period swimsuits were not compatible with pool technology of the time, the facilities had to be male only. But nowadays, it's a place where even old Hindu women can go and have fun. (Plus its notoriety as a hook-up spot for gay men, which inspired the Music/VillagePeople song). song.) It is still an association, though.



* Dunkin' Donuts. While they still sell donuts, they've also expanded to breakfast sandwiches and have given a particular emphasis to their coffee and coffee-based beverages. Ever since the TurnOfTheMillennium, they've been branding themselves as a cheaper, unpretentious alternative to Starbucks. In 2017, the company decided they'd try [[https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/business/wp/2017/08/04/dunkin-donuts-wants-to-leave-a-doughnut-sized-hole-in-its-name/?utm_term=.8da9ed40a49a&wpisrc=nl_az_most&wpmk=1 dropping the "Donuts" part from the name, simply calling it "Dunkin']].

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* Dunkin' Donuts. While they still sell donuts, they've also expanded to breakfast sandwiches and have given a particular emphasis to their coffee and coffee-based beverages. Ever since the TurnOfTheMillennium, they've been branding themselves as a cheaper, unpretentious alternative to Starbucks. In 2017, the company decided they'd try [[https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/business/wp/2017/08/04/dunkin-donuts-wants-to-leave-a-doughnut-sized-hole-in-its-name/?utm_term=.8da9ed40a49a&wpisrc=nl_az_most&wpmk=1 dropping the "Donuts" part from the name, simply calling it "Dunkin']]. The company made this rebranding official in January 2019.



* Broadcast TV and radio stations will occasionally have callsigns that end up in this territory, if a major change occurs to the station and the owner decides not to change the callsign to compensate. Probably the easiest example to come up with right off the bat is WNET; the callsign used to refer to Creator/{{PBS}} prior to 1970, NET (National Educational Television). When PBS took over, the callsign was never changed, so the station remains WNET to this day. Another simple example would be any station that is currently an Creator/{{Ion}} affiliate; the former name of the network was PAX, and almost every station run by it had "PX" somewhere in the callsign with another letter before or after it denoting the city (WPPX for Philidelphia, KPXD for Dallas, WCPX for Chicago, etc). When PAX folded in 2005, none of the stations had their callsigns changed likely due to the sheer number of them, so the "PX" remains in all of them to this day.

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* Broadcast TV and radio stations will occasionally have callsigns that end up in this territory, if a major change occurs to the station and the owner decides not to change the callsign to compensate. Probably the easiest example to come up with right off the bat is WNET; the callsign used to refer to Creator/{{PBS}} prior to 1970, NET (National Educational Television). When PBS took over, the callsign was never changed, so the station remains WNET to this day. Another simple example would be any station that is currently an Creator/{{Ion}} affiliate; the former name of the network was PAX, and almost every station run by it had "PX" somewhere in the callsign with another letter before or after it denoting the city (WPPX for Philidelphia, Philadelphia, KPXD for Dallas, WCPX for Chicago, etc). When PAX folded in 2005, none of the stations had their callsigns changed likely due to the sheer number of them, so the "PX" remains in all of them to this day.



* XBMC, an open-source media player. It was originally developed solely for the Xbox under the name Xbox Media Center. As time went by, the development team ditched the Xbox platform and moved on to Windows, Linux, UsefulNotes/MacOS, iOS and Android among others. This led to the program being referred to as the acronym, rather than the full name.

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* XBMC, an open-source media player. It was originally developed solely for the Xbox under the name Xbox Media Center. As time went by, the development team ditched the Xbox platform and moved on to Windows, Linux, UsefulNotes/MacOS, iOS [=iOS=] and Android among others. This led to the program being referred to as the acronym, rather than the full name.

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