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* NonHumanSidekick: Jiji.

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* NonHumanSidekick: Jiji.Jiji, Kiki's sarcastic black cat.


* HairDecorations: The preposterously large bow Kiki wears in the film is modeled on her depiction in the original illustrations, which is in turn modeled on early 20th-century book, magazine and advertisement illustrations


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* SignatureHeadgear: Kiki is well known for her huge, red hair bow, which she's never seen without. It's modeled on her depiction in illustrations from the original book the movie is based on, which is in turn modeled on early 20th-century book, magazine and advertisement illustrations. The red bow is so well-associated with Kiki that in the end credits of the film, a little girl is seen dressed up just like her, bow included.


* FriendlessBackground: A downplayed example. Since Kiki grew up in a small insular town, she's had few friends her age (three show up to see her off) and she's forced to leave them behind. Her closest companion is Jiji who acts more of a mentor. Part of her growth is learning how to interact with other children.

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* FriendlessBackground: A downplayed example. Since Kiki grew up in a small insular town, she's had few friends her age (three (four show up to see her off) and she's forced to leave them behind. Her closest companion is Jiji who acts more of a mentor. Part of her growth is learning how to interact with other children.


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* RiddleForTheAges: Whether or not Kiki decides to return to her home town or spend the rest of her life in Koriko is open to interpretation. Most likely the former, as she states to Jiji that she has decided not to leave.


* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: This was Disney's first English dub of a Ghibli film and it noticably takes a lot more liberties with the film compared to their later dubs, such as adding new voice lines for scenes that were originally silent, changing a decent chunk of the film's music, including the opening and ending themes to new themes composed by Sydney Forest, amongst other changes, granted, none of the changes bring down the film entirely and many fans like and even prefer the changes made to the film, but it can still be a bit jarring to see the amount of liberties taken with this film in hindsight considering Disney's later Ghibli dubs stayed largefully faithful to the original japanese releases with very few changes. Disney would however later reverse a lot of these changes for their 2010 rerelease of the film in an attempt to be more faithful to the original Japanese release.

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* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: This was Disney's first English dub of a Ghibli film and it noticably takes a lot more liberties with the film compared to their later dubs, such as adding new voice lines for scenes that were originally silent, changing a decent chunk of the film's music, including the opening and ending themes to new themes composed by Sydney Forest, amongst other changes, granted, none of the changes bring down the film entirely and many fans like and even prefer the changes made to the film, but it can still be a bit jarring to see the amount of liberties taken with this film in hindsight considering Disney's later Ghibli dubs stayed largefully faithful to the original japanese Japanese releases with very few changes. Disney would however later reverse a lot of these changes for their 2010 rerelease of the film in an attempt to be more faithful to the original Japanese release.


* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: This was Disney's first English dub of a Ghibli film and it noticably takes a lot more liberties with the film compared to their later dubs, such as adding new voice lines for scenes that were originally silent, changing a decent chunk of the film's music, including the opening and ending themes to new themes composed by Sydney Forest, amongst other changes, granted, none of the changes bring down the film entirely and many fans like and even prefer the changes made to the film, but it can still be a bit jarring to see the amount of liberties taken with this film in hindsight considering Disney's later Ghibli dubs stayed largefully faithful to the film with very few changes. Disney would however later reverse a lot of these changes for their 2010 rerelease of the film in an attempt to be more faithful to the original Japanese release.

to:

* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: This was Disney's first English dub of a Ghibli film and it noticably takes a lot more liberties with the film compared to their later dubs, such as adding new voice lines for scenes that were originally silent, changing a decent chunk of the film's music, including the opening and ending themes to new themes composed by Sydney Forest, amongst other changes, granted, none of the changes bring down the film entirely and many fans like and even prefer the changes made to the film, but it can still be a bit jarring to see the amount of liberties taken with this film in hindsight considering Disney's later Ghibli dubs stayed largefully faithful to the film original japanese releases with very few changes. Disney would however later reverse a lot of these changes for their 2010 rerelease of the film in an attempt to be more faithful to the original Japanese release.


* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: This was Disney's first english dub of a Ghibli film and it noticably takes a lot more liberties with the film compared to their later dubs, such as adding new voice lines for scenes that were originally slient, changing a decent chunk of the film's music, including the opening and ending themes to new themes composed by Sydney Forest, amongst other changes, granted, none of the changes bring down the film entirely and many fans like and even prefer the changes made to the film, but it can still be a bit jarring to see the amount of liberties taken with this film in hindsight considering Disney's later Ghibli dubs stayed largefully faithful to the film with very few changes. Disney would however later reverse a lot of these changes for their 2010 rerelease of the film in an attempt to be more faithful to the original japanese release.

to:

* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: This was Disney's first english English dub of a Ghibli film and it noticably takes a lot more liberties with the film compared to their later dubs, such as adding new voice lines for scenes that were originally slient, silent, changing a decent chunk of the film's music, including the opening and ending themes to new themes composed by Sydney Forest, amongst other changes, granted, none of the changes bring down the film entirely and many fans like and even prefer the changes made to the film, but it can still be a bit jarring to see the amount of liberties taken with this film in hindsight considering Disney's later Ghibli dubs stayed largefully faithful to the film with very few changes. Disney would however later reverse a lot of these changes for their 2010 rerelease of the film in an attempt to be more faithful to the original japanese Japanese release.


* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: This was Disney's first english dub of a Ghibli film and it noticably takes a lot more liberties with the film compared to their later dubs, such as adding new voice lines for scenes that were originally slient, changing a decent chunk of the film's music, including the opening and ending themes to new themes composed by Sydney Forest, amongst other changes, granted, none of the changes bring down the film entirely and many fans like and even prefer the changes made to the film, but it can still be a bit jarring to see the amount of liberties taken with this film in hindsight considering Disney's later Ghibli dubs stayed largefully faithful to the film with very few changes. Disney would however later reverse a lot of these changes for their 2010 rerelease of the film, [[Main/BrokenBase for better or for worst]].

to:

* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: This was Disney's first english dub of a Ghibli film and it noticably takes a lot more liberties with the film compared to their later dubs, such as adding new voice lines for scenes that were originally slient, changing a decent chunk of the film's music, including the opening and ending themes to new themes composed by Sydney Forest, amongst other changes, granted, none of the changes bring down the film entirely and many fans like and even prefer the changes made to the film, but it can still be a bit jarring to see the amount of liberties taken with this film in hindsight considering Disney's later Ghibli dubs stayed largefully faithful to the film with very few changes. Disney would however later reverse a lot of these changes for their 2010 rerelease of the film, [[Main/BrokenBase for better or for worst]].film in an attempt to be more faithful to the original japanese release.

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* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: This was Disney's first english dub of a Ghibli film and it noticably takes a lot more liberties with the film compared to their later dubs, such as adding new voice lines for scenes that were originally slient, changing a decent chunk of the film's music, including the opening and ending themes to new themes composed by Sydney Forest, amongst other changes, granted, none of the changes bring down the film entirely and many fans like and even prefer the changes made to the film, but it can still be a bit jarring to see the amount of liberties taken with this film in hindsight considering Disney's later Ghibli dubs stayed largefully faithful to the film with very few changes. Disney would however later reverse a lot of these changes for their 2010 rerelease of the film, [[Main/BrokenBase for better or for worst]].


* AmbiguousTimePeriod: At the beginning of the movie, one of Kiki's friends mentions discos, so it would seem the movie takes place in the 1970s or later, but most of the technology we see looks like it's from the 1950s or earlier. The Disney dub omits this reference, but adds in ''very'' 1990s {{techno}} music during the scene with Madame's granddaughter, muddying things even further.

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* AmbiguousTimePeriod: At the beginning of the movie, one of Kiki's friends mentions discos, so it would seem the movie takes place in the 1970s or later, but most of the technology we see looks like it's from the 1950s or earlier. The Disney dub omits this reference, but adds in ''very'' 1990s {{techno}} music during the scene with Madame's granddaughter, muddying things even further. Also not helping are the dresses Kiki's friends from her hometown wear, which wouldn't look out of place in the Victorian era.

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** Actually they're hooded crows, [[ShownTheirWork and so look a bit like magpies.]] They're native to Germany, where the story is implied to be set.

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* {{Kishotenketsu}}: The film is one of most famous examples of this formula: in its first act, Kiki, Tombo, and the city of Koriko are introduced; in the second, we learn more about Kiki's hard-working nature and Tombo's aeronautical aspirations; the twist is the sudden loss of Kiki's powers and Tombo's flying machine accident; and the conclusion sees Kiki regain her flying powers and rescue Tombo.

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** The weather throughout the movie is... Temperamental to say the least. Every clear night forecast ends up being wrong, with Kiki being caught twice in unexpected rainfall, both times with big consequences for the plot. Also there's the gusts of wind, like when the geese warn Jiji during the first delivery.


* VictoriasSecretCompartment: Yes, in a kid's film. Kiki keeps things down the front of her dress while flying her broom. A bit odd considering that Kiki's dress has pockets.

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* VictoriasSecretCompartment: Yes, in a kid's film. Kiki keeps things down the front of her dress while flying her broom. A bit odd considering that Kiki's dress has pockets. The reason women can make this work is because whatever they're stashing is kept secure due to the relatively snug fit between their breasts and their bra. Kiki, as several scenes show, only wears a loose-fitting camisole-style top, so it may be that her dress has pockets sewn on the inside.


''Kiki's Delivery Service'' (''Majo no Takkyubin'' / 魔女の宅急便) is a 1989 Creator/HayaoMiyazaki film from Creator/StudioGhibli based rather loosely on an illustrated novel by Eiko Kadono. Kiki is a witch who has just recently turned 13, which means it's time for her to strike out on her own. Heading "south towards the ocean" with her talking black cat Jiji, she soon finds a sprawling seaside town that does not yet have a resident witch of their own. Upon trying to establish herself, however, she is quickly lost in the sights and wonders the big city has to offer. As she tries to cope with city life, it becomes clear that her witch powers still need some fine-tuning. She quickly befriends a baker, who temporarily employs Kiki to make a delivery using the only power she has -- [[FlyingPostman flight]], via [[FlyingBroomstick broom]]. Inspired by her initial success, Kiki establishes an independent delivery service in the attic of the baker's shop. As time goes on and her business gains success, she continues to refine her magical skills and befriends a young boy from a local aviation enthusiasts' club. Despite the magical nature of the protagonist, the plot largely revolves around the trials and tribulations of normal adolescence.

to:

''Kiki's Delivery Service'' (''Majo no Takkyubin'' / Takkyubin'' / 魔女の宅急便) is a 1989 Creator/HayaoMiyazaki film from Creator/StudioGhibli based rather loosely on an illustrated novel by Eiko Kadono. Kiki is a witch who has just recently turned 13, which means it's time for her to strike out on her own. Heading "south towards the ocean" with her talking black cat Jiji, she soon finds a sprawling seaside town that does not yet have a resident witch of their own. Upon trying to establish herself, however, she is quickly lost in the sights and wonders the big city has to offer. As she tries to cope with city life, it becomes clear that her witch powers still need some fine-tuning. She quickly befriends a baker, who temporarily employs Kiki to make a delivery using the only power she has -- [[FlyingPostman flight]], via [[FlyingBroomstick broom]]. Inspired by her initial success, Kiki establishes an independent delivery service in the attic of the baker's shop. As time goes on and her business gains success, she continues to refine her magical skills and befriends a young boy from a local aviation enthusiasts' club. Despite the magical nature of the protagonist, the plot largely revolves around the trials and tribulations of normal adolescence.

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