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!!! Because men are easier to seduce than men

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!!! Because men are easier to seduce than menwomen

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!!! Because the possibility of a woman being abused is worse than a man being abused


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!!! Because men are easier to seduce than men


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!!! Because writers are biased


It's quite rare for a female hero to have feelings for, or pursue romance with a male villain, despite things such as the AllGirlsWantBadBoys trope. There are several possible reasons why it's often male hero/female villain and not female hero/male villain. In most societies since antiquity, there are various levels of social codes, both spoken and unspoken, that dictate that men should protect women. This could mean that with the hero/villainess dynamic, the hero is there to protect the woman from herself. In a heroine/villain relationship, a woman who would take up the mantle of heroine is unlikely one that would seek (and would be reluctant to accept) protection, not to mention that a villain is unlikely to offer protection (more often than not HE would be a threat). There is also the idea that a heroic woman would have the moral fiber to refuse the advances of a villainous man; though this carries the DoubleStandard that a woman can resist her libido if the man is evil, but the man.... [[ImAManICantHelpIt not]] [[AllMenArePerverts so]] [[MyGirlIsNotASlut much]] (which is not TruthInTelevision in real life depending on the woman; again, remember the AllGirlsWantBadBoys trope. The idea of a good woman being attracted to an evil man is avoided is because it could carry [[DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything parallels or similarities]] to the issues of rape or domestic abuse; while both genders can be the victim or the abuser in a relationship, there is... [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement often a bias in favor]] [[MenAreTheExpendableGender of seeing the woman as a victim or innocent]]. It could at times be, for example, [[MostWritersAreMale male writers idealizing their female characters]] out of AuthorAppeal, or [[{{UsefulNotes/Feminism}} feminist writers seeking to put out a positive image of women]].

Why this thinking is applied to men less often could be contentious issue, as it can potentially dip into [[DoubleStandard Double Standards]] sexist against men or women. Some people think that WomenAreWiser, and thus heroines will know to resist the villain's charms and do so (the existence of the AllGirlsWantBadBoys trope proves this isn't universally true). Some think that men aren't as good as seduction as women (though this stems from the fact that men and women are usually attracted to different things in each other - in regards to physical appearance [[MyGirlIsNotASlut and]] [[GoldDigger other]] [[ThrillSeeker things]]). Others assume, and it's a popular stereotype, that men [[ImAManICantHelpIt can't deny their libidos even when they should]] while women don't have this problem (the existence of the AllGirlsWantBadBoys, MyGirlIsASlut, EthicalSlut and the gender neutral ReallyGetsAround prove it's not universally true).

to:

It's quite rare for a female hero to have feelings for, or pursue romance with a male villain, despite things such as the AllGirlsWantBadBoys trope. There are several possible reasons why it's often male hero/female villain and not female hero/male villain. In most societies since antiquity, there are various levels of social codes, both spoken and unspoken, that dictate that men should protect women. This could mean that with the hero/villainess dynamic, the hero is there to protect the woman from herself. In a heroine/villain relationship, a woman who would take up the mantle of heroine is unlikely one that would seek (and would be reluctant to accept) protection, not to mention that a villain is unlikely to offer protection (more protection. Additionally with a male villain, often than not HE ''he'' would be a threat). threat, in a way that's indicative of an abusive boyfriend. In the real world, domestic abuse is something both men and women experience, but the socialization around abuse is very different by gender. An abusive boyfriend is worse than an abusive girlfriend thanks to the DoubleStandardAbuseFemaleOnMale.

There is also the idea that a heroic woman would have the moral fiber to refuse the advances of a villainous man; though this man. This carries the DoubleStandard that a woman can resist her libido if the man is evil, but the man.... a man [[ImAManICantHelpIt not]] [[AllMenArePerverts so]] [[MyGirlIsNotASlut much]] (which is not TruthInTelevision in real life depending on can't deny their libidos even when they should]]. Some people think that WomenAreWiser, and thus heroines will know to resist the woman; again, remember villain's charms and do so. (The existence of the AllGirlsWantBadBoys trope. The idea of a trope proves this isn't universally true.) Some think that men aren't as good woman being as seduction as women. (This stems from the fact that men and women are usually attracted to an evil man is avoided is because it could carry [[DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything parallels or similarities]] different things in each other--men are more attracted to the issues of rape or domestic abuse; while both genders can be the victim or the abuser in a relationship, there is... [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement often a bias in favor]] [[MenAreTheExpendableGender of seeing the woman as a victim or innocent]]. physical appearance, which allows for faster seduction.)

It could at times be, for example, [[MostWritersAreMale male writers idealizing their female characters]] out of AuthorAppeal, or [[{{UsefulNotes/Feminism}} feminist writers seeking to put out a positive image of women]].

Why this thinking is applied to men less often could be contentious issue, as it can potentially dip into [[DoubleStandard Double Standards]] sexist against men or women. Some people think that WomenAreWiser, and thus heroines will know to resist the villain's charms and do so (the existence of the AllGirlsWantBadBoys trope proves this isn't universally true). Some think that men aren't as good as seduction as women (though this stems from the fact that men and women are usually attracted to different things in each other - in regards to physical appearance [[MyGirlIsNotASlut and]] [[GoldDigger other]] [[ThrillSeeker things]]). Others assume, and it's a popular stereotype, that men [[ImAManICantHelpIt can't deny their libidos even when they should]] while women don't have this problem (the existence of the AllGirlsWantBadBoys, MyGirlIsASlut, EthicalSlut and the gender neutral ReallyGetsAround prove it's not universally true).
women]].


There are several possible reasons why it's often male hero/female villain and not female hero/male villain. In most societies since antiquity, there are various levels of social codes, both spoken and unspoken, that dictate that men should protect women. This could mean that with the hero/villainess dynamic, the hero is there to protect the woman from herself. In a heroine/villain relationship, a woman who would take up the mantle of heroine is not one that would seek (and would be reluctant to accept) protection (and some would consider her needing to be protected from herself), not to mention that a villain is unlikely to offer protection (more often than not HE would be a threat). The idea of a good woman being attracted to an evil man could also carry [[DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything parallels or similarities]] to the issues of rape or domestic abuse; while both genders can be the victim or the abuser in a relationship, there is... [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement often a bias in favor]] [[MenAreTheExpendableGender of seeing the woman as a victim or innocent]]. It could at times be, for example, [[MostWritersAreMale male writers idealizing their female characters]] out of AuthorAppeal, or [[{{UsefulNotes/Feminism}} feminist writers seeking to put out a positive image of women]].

to:

It's quite rare for a female hero to have feelings for, or pursue romance with a male villain, despite things such as the AllGirlsWantBadBoys trope. There are several possible reasons why it's often male hero/female villain and not female hero/male villain. In most societies since antiquity, there are various levels of social codes, both spoken and unspoken, that dictate that men should protect women. This could mean that with the hero/villainess dynamic, the hero is there to protect the woman from herself. In a heroine/villain relationship, a woman who would take up the mantle of heroine is not unlikely one that would seek (and would be reluctant to accept) protection (and some would consider her needing to be protected from herself), protection, not to mention that a villain is unlikely to offer protection (more often than not HE would be a threat). threat). There is also the idea that a heroic woman would have the moral fiber to refuse the advances of a villainous man; though this carries the DoubleStandard that a woman can resist her libido if the man is evil, but the man.... [[ImAManICantHelpIt not]] [[AllMenArePerverts so]] [[MyGirlIsNotASlut much]] (which is not TruthInTelevision in real life depending on the woman; again, remember the AllGirlsWantBadBoys trope. The idea of a good woman being attracted to an evil man is avoided is because it could also carry [[DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything parallels or similarities]] to the issues of rape or domestic abuse; while both genders can be the victim or the abuser in a relationship, there is... [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement often a bias in favor]] [[MenAreTheExpendableGender of seeing the woman as a victim or innocent]]. It could at times be, for example, [[MostWritersAreMale male writers idealizing their female characters]] out of AuthorAppeal, or [[{{UsefulNotes/Feminism}} feminist writers seeking to put out a positive image of women]].


This trope does have some basis in real life. The idea of the AllGirlsWantBadBoys and the ForbiddenFruit tropes play a part.

While the most cited example is the AllGirlsWantBadBoys trope, the gender dynamic in this trope is less often that a female hero is attracted to a male villain. There are several reasons for this. In most societies since antiquity, there are various levels of social codes, both spoken and unspoken, that dictate that men should protect women. This could mean that with the hero/villainess dynamic the hero is there to protect the woman from herself, with a heroine/villain dynamic a woman who would take up the mantle of heroine is not one that would seek (and would be reluctant to accept) protection (and some would consider her needing to be protected from herself); not to mention that a villain is unlikely to offer protection (more often than not HE would be the threat). The idea of a good woman being attracted to an evil man could also carry [[DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything parallels or similarities]] to the issues of rape or domestic abuse (in particular if it was a heroine trying to invoke a ICanChangeMyBeloved to try and make a villain reform). It could at times be, for example, [[MostWritersAreMale male writers idealizing their characters]] or [[{{UsefulNotes/Feminism}} feminist writers seeking to put out a positive image of women]].

Why this thinking is applied to men less often could be contentious issue, as it can potentially dip into [[DoubleStandard Double Standards]] sexist against men or women. Some people think that WomenAreWiser, and thus heroines will know to resist the villain's charms and do so (the existence of the AllGirlsWantBadBoys trope proves this isn't universally true). Others assume, and it's a popular stereotype, that men [[ImAManICantHelpIt can't deny their libidos]] while women can (the existence of the MyGirlIsASlut, EthicalSlut and the gender neutral ReallyGetsAround prove it's not universally true).

to:

This trope does have some basis in real life. The idea of the AllGirlsWantBadBoys and the ForbiddenFruit tropes play a part.

While the most cited example is the AllGirlsWantBadBoys trope, the gender dynamic in this trope is less often that a female hero is attracted to a male villain. There are several possible reasons for this. why it's often male hero/female villain and not female hero/male villain. In most societies since antiquity, there are various levels of social codes, both spoken and unspoken, that dictate that men should protect women. women. This could mean that with the hero/villainess dynamic dynamic, the hero is there to protect the woman from herself, with herself. In a heroine/villain dynamic relationship, a woman who would take up the mantle of heroine is not one that would seek (and would be reluctant to accept) protection (and some would consider her needing to be protected from herself); herself), not to mention that a villain is unlikely to offer protection (more often than not HE would be the threat). a threat). The idea of a good woman being attracted to an evil man could also carry [[DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything parallels or similarities]] to the issues of rape or domestic abuse (in particular if it was abuse; while both genders can be the victim or the abuser in a heroine trying to invoke relationship, there is... [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement often a ICanChangeMyBeloved to try and make bias in favor]] [[MenAreTheExpendableGender of seeing the woman as a villain reform). victim or innocent]]. It could at times be, for example, [[MostWritersAreMale male writers idealizing their female characters]] out of AuthorAppeal, or [[{{UsefulNotes/Feminism}} feminist writers seeking to put out a positive image of women]].

Why this thinking is applied to men less often could be contentious issue, as it can potentially dip into [[DoubleStandard Double Standards]] sexist against men or women. Some people think that WomenAreWiser, and thus heroines will know to resist the villain's charms and do so (the existence of the AllGirlsWantBadBoys trope proves this isn't universally true). true). Some think that men aren't as good as seduction as women (though this stems from the fact that men and women are usually attracted to different things in each other - in regards to physical appearance [[MyGirlIsNotASlut and]] [[GoldDigger other]] [[ThrillSeeker things]]). Others assume, and it's a popular stereotype, that men [[ImAManICantHelpIt can't deny their libidos]] libidos even when they should]] while women can don't have this problem (the existence of the AllGirlsWantBadBoys, MyGirlIsASlut, EthicalSlut and the gender neutral ReallyGetsAround prove it's not universally true).


This trope does have some basis in real life.

to:

This trope does have some basis in real life. The idea of the AllGirlsWantBadBoys and the ForbiddenFruit tropes play a part.


While the most cited example is the AllGirlsWantBadBoys trope, the gender dynamic in this trope is less often that a female hero is attracted to a male villain. There are several reasons for this. In most societies since antiquity, there are various levels of social codes, both spoken and unspoken, that dictate that men should protect women. This could mean that with the hero/villainess dynamic the hero is there to protect the woman from herself, with a heroine/villain dynamic a woman who would take up the mantle of heroine is not one that would seek (and would be reluctant to accept) protection (and some would consider her needing to be protected from herself); not to mention that a villain is unlikely to offer protection (more often than not HE would be the threat). The idea of a good woman being attracted to an evil man could also carry [[DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything parallels or similarities]] to the issues of rape or domestic abuse (in particular if it was a heroine trying to invoke a ICanChangeMyBeloved to try and make a villain reform). It could in some cases, [[MostWritersAreMale male writers idealizing their characters]] ([[{{UsefulNotes/Feminism}} or feminist writers seeking to put out a positive image of women]]).

to:

While the most cited example is the AllGirlsWantBadBoys trope, the gender dynamic in this trope is less often that a female hero is attracted to a male villain. There are several reasons for this. In most societies since antiquity, there are various levels of social codes, both spoken and unspoken, that dictate that men should protect women. This could mean that with the hero/villainess dynamic the hero is there to protect the woman from herself, with a heroine/villain dynamic a woman who would take up the mantle of heroine is not one that would seek (and would be reluctant to accept) protection (and some would consider her needing to be protected from herself); not to mention that a villain is unlikely to offer protection (more often than not HE would be the threat). The idea of a good woman being attracted to an evil man could also carry [[DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything parallels or similarities]] to the issues of rape or domestic abuse (in particular if it was a heroine trying to invoke a ICanChangeMyBeloved to try and make a villain reform). It could in some cases, at times be, for example, [[MostWritersAreMale male writers idealizing their characters]] ([[{{UsefulNotes/Feminism}} or [[{{UsefulNotes/Feminism}} feminist writers seeking to put out a positive image of women]]).women]].


While the most cited example is the AllGirlsWantBadBoys trope, the gender dynamic in this trope is rarely a female hero being attracted to a male villain. There are several reasons for this. In most societies since antiquity, there are various levels of social codes, both spoken and unspoken, that dictate that men should protect women. This could mean that with the hero/villainess dynamic the hero is there to protect the woman from herself, with a heroine/villain dynamic a woman who would take up the mantle of heroine is not one that would seek (and would be reluctant to accept) protection; not to mention that a villain is unlikely to offer protection (more often than not HE would be the threat). The idea of a good woman being attracted to an evil man could also carry [[DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything parallels or similarities]] to the issues of rape or domestic abuse. It could in some cases, [[MostWritersAreMale male writers idealizing their characters]] ([[{{UsefulNotes/Feminism}} or feminist writers seeking to put out a positive image of women]]).

Why this thinking is applied to men less often could be contentious

to:

While the most cited example is the AllGirlsWantBadBoys trope, the gender dynamic in this trope is rarely less often that a female hero being is attracted to a male villain. villain. There are several reasons for this. this. In most societies since antiquity, there are various levels of social codes, both spoken and unspoken, that dictate that men should protect women. This could mean that with the hero/villainess dynamic the hero is there to protect the woman from herself, with a heroine/villain dynamic a woman who would take up the mantle of heroine is not one that would seek (and would be reluctant to accept) protection; protection (and some would consider her needing to be protected from herself); not to mention that a villain is unlikely to offer protection (more often than not HE would be the threat). The idea of a good woman being attracted to an evil man could also carry [[DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything parallels or similarities]] to the issues of rape or domestic abuse.abuse (in particular if it was a heroine trying to invoke a ICanChangeMyBeloved to try and make a villain reform). It could in some cases, [[MostWritersAreMale male writers idealizing their characters]] ([[{{UsefulNotes/Feminism}} or feminist writers seeking to put out a positive image of women]]).

Why this thinking is applied to men less often could be contentiouscontentious issue, as it can potentially dip into [[DoubleStandard Double Standards]] sexist against men or women. Some people think that WomenAreWiser, and thus heroines will know to resist the villain's charms and do so (the existence of the AllGirlsWantBadBoys trope proves this isn't universally true). Others assume, and it's a popular stereotype, that men [[ImAManICantHelpIt can't deny their libidos]] while women can (the existence of the MyGirlIsASlut, EthicalSlut and the gender neutral ReallyGetsAround prove it's not universally true).


While the most cited example is the AllGirlsWantBadBoys trope, the gender dynamic in this trope is rarely a female hero being attracted to a male villain. There are several reasons for this. In most societies since antiquity, there are various levels of social codes, both spoken and unspoken, that dictate that men should protect women. This could mean that with the hero/villainess dynamic the hero is there to protect the woman from herself, with a heroine/villain dynamic a woman who would take up the mantle of heroine is not one that would seek (and would be reluctant to accept) protection; not to mention that a villain is unlikely to offer protection (more often than not HE would be the threat). The idea of a good woman being attracted to an evil man could also carry [[DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything parallels or similarities]] to the issues of rape or domestic abuse.

to:

While the most cited example is the AllGirlsWantBadBoys trope, the gender dynamic in this trope is rarely a female hero being attracted to a male villain. There are several reasons for this. In most societies since antiquity, there are various levels of social codes, both spoken and unspoken, that dictate that men should protect women. This could mean that with the hero/villainess dynamic the hero is there to protect the woman from herself, with a heroine/villain dynamic a woman who would take up the mantle of heroine is not one that would seek (and would be reluctant to accept) protection; not to mention that a villain is unlikely to offer protection (more often than not HE would be the threat). The idea of a good woman being attracted to an evil man could also carry [[DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything parallels or similarities]] to the issues of rape or domestic abuse. It could in some cases, [[MostWritersAreMale male writers idealizing their characters]] ([[{{UsefulNotes/Feminism}} or feminist writers seeking to put out a positive image of women]]).


While the most cited example is the AllGirlsWantBadBoys trope, the gender dynamic in this trope is rarely a female hero being attracted to a male villain. There are several reasons for this. In most societies since antiquity, there are various levels of social codes, both spoken and unspoken, that dictate that men should protect women. This could mean that with the hero/villainess dynamic the hero is there to protect the woman from herself, with a heroine/villain dynamic a woman who would take up the mantle of heroine is not one that would seek (and would be reluctant to accept) protection; not to mention that a villain is unlikely to offer protection (more often than not HE would be the threat). The idea of a good woman being attracted to an evil man could also carry [[DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything parallels or similarities]] to the issues of rape or domestic abuse.

to:

While the most cited example is the AllGirlsWantBadBoys trope, the gender dynamic in this trope is rarely a female hero being attracted to a male villain. There are several reasons for this. In most societies since antiquity, there are various levels of social codes, both spoken and unspoken, that dictate that men should protect women. This could mean that with the hero/villainess dynamic the hero is there to protect the woman from herself, with a heroine/villain dynamic a woman who would take up the mantle of heroine is not one that would seek (and would be reluctant to accept) protection; not to mention that a villain is unlikely to offer protection (more often than not HE would be the threat). The idea of a good woman being attracted to an evil man could also carry [[DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything parallels or similarities]] to the issues of rape or domestic abuse.

Why this thinking is applied to men less often could be contentious


While the most cited example is the AllGirlsWantBadBoys trope, the gender dynamic in this trope is rarely a female hero being attracted to a male villain. There are several reasons for this. In most societies since antiquity, there are various levels of social codes, both spoken and unspoken, that dictate that men should protect women. This could mean that with the hero/villainess dynamic the hero is there to protect the woman from herself, with a heroine/villain dynamic a woman who would take up the mantle of heroine is not one that would seek (and would be reluctant to accept) protection; not to mention that a villain is unlikely to offer protection (more often than not HE would be the threat).

to:

While the most cited example is the AllGirlsWantBadBoys trope, the gender dynamic in this trope is rarely a female hero being attracted to a male villain. There are several reasons for this. In most societies since antiquity, there are various levels of social codes, both spoken and unspoken, that dictate that men should protect women. This could mean that with the hero/villainess dynamic the hero is there to protect the woman from herself, with a heroine/villain dynamic a woman who would take up the mantle of heroine is not one that would seek (and would be reluctant to accept) protection; not to mention that a villain is unlikely to offer protection (more often than not HE would be the threat). The idea of a good woman being attracted to an evil man could also carry [[DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything parallels or similarities]] to the issues of rape or domestic abuse.

Added DiffLines:

This trope does have some basis in real life.

While the most cited example is the AllGirlsWantBadBoys trope, the gender dynamic in this trope is rarely a female hero being attracted to a male villain. There are several reasons for this. In most societies since antiquity, there are various levels of social codes, both spoken and unspoken, that dictate that men should protect women. This could mean that with the hero/villainess dynamic the hero is there to protect the woman from herself, with a heroine/villain dynamic a woman who would take up the mantle of heroine is not one that would seek (and would be reluctant to accept) protection; not to mention that a villain is unlikely to offer protection (more often than not HE would be the threat).

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