TV Tropes Org
site search

A review is one person's opinion. TV Tropes doesn't have an opinion. The person who signed the review does.

sort by: type:
correct subject add a review about reviews
Uncharted 2 was amazing!
As suggested in the title Uncharted 2: Among Thieves was an amazing game. On all fronts, it exceeded my low expectations for the game, not having played the series before, but let's start at the beginning.

I first played the Demo of Uncharted: Drake's Fortune on the PS3 and based on the Demo I was unimpressed. It had terrible shooting mechanics and the cover system was not the best, but it was in beta and as most demo's will attest, it does not represent the final product. Oh if only that were true. The game play was terrible and did not reflect the action style the game seemed to be going for. Cinematicly, the game was amazing. Great story, great writing, great voice acting, great graphics too, but all of that gets destroyed by the abysmal controls, terrible fight scenes (protracted fire fights that last far too long) and generally bad pacing as a result. Not to mention the even worse vehicle controls (thankfully no more driving sequences in future titles).

At best I would say to watch the made for youtube movie edit of the game (as the story IS good) and just avoid playing it.

Uncharted 2 on the other hand was amazing in every respect. Aside from being linear (which serves the game's style so is not a detraction) it has all the hallmarks of a game of the year. If there is something about the game that is not good it is the ending fight, but by that point you just don't care and once it is over, you will be marveling at the leap in mechanics from Uncharted 1.

Play this game if you own a PS3. You will not be disappointed.

Then there is Uncharted 3: Drake's Deception. What happened Naughty Dog? The game starts out pretty good, very "Nathan Drake", but after the initial story point it starts to quickly turn into a mediocre title. The graphics and acting are still outstanding (some of the best), but the actual story is a little less than stellar, and the game play starts to suffer early on and all of it only goes down hill from there. By the end, both the story and the mechanics have gone to a point that is actually worse than Uncharted was and it ends up trying too hard to capture what the previous games had... or something... intangible, but it ends up not being good on any front and you just want it to END. When it does finally... well...

Don't play Uncharted 3 and don't even watch it unless you have nothing better to do.
  # comments: 2
flag for mods
An incredible single-player experience with a surprisingly great online multiplayer.
I think everybody who has heard of Uncharted know that each game has a highly acclaimed single-player story (Uncharted 2's was the best, in my opinion), to the point that nobody really talks about the multiplayer.

Uncharted 3, the most recent entry in the franchise, has an extremely fun online multiplayer that takes some of the cinematic sequences in the single-player and implements them in the multiplayer. The Chateau multiplayer map, for example, has a room where the floor and ceiling will fall, killing any players caught in the debris.

In the multiplayer, you can choose for six different rifles and four different pistols. Weapon customization is much simpler here than it is in Call of Duty and Battlefield. Whether you take this as a bad thing because it's "watered down" or a good thing because it's easier to pick up and play, Uncharted 3 presents a nice loadout system with decent weapon customization, boosters (similar to Call of Duty's perks), and kickbacks (similar to Call of Duty's killstreaks, but modified to help out newer players, too).

The game has many different modes, including your standard Team Deathmatch, Free For All, Objectives, and Capture The Flag modes (though here, CTF involves a heavy golden idol instead of a flag and it works like Halo CTF), but the most impressive modes are the most unique ones: Elimination and Three Team Deathmatch, by far my two favorite modes in the game.

Elimination has five rounds, each three minutes long, where you have to kill everyone on the opposing team. There are no respawns. The team with more alive players by the end of the round win the round. To win, you have to win three out of the five rounds. The final 30 seconds of each round reveals the location of every player, to prevent camping.

Three Team Deathmatch is a 2v2v2 deathmatch mode. I haven't ever heard of a mode like this being done in a multiplayer game, but it's an extremely exciting, competitive, and above all fun, mode. Be sure to get a friend in your party and then enter the 3TDM matchmaking, it's more fun that way.

Released with some issues, Uncharted 3's main bugs and problems have been fixed since and while not perfect, it is a very fun game for third-person shooter fans everywhere. If you have a PS 3, it's a must-buy. If you don't have a PS 3, buy one to buy this game.
  # comments: 0
flag for mods
Drake's Deception: Needs Some Refining
Uncharted is becoming stale. Very little innovation is offered in Drake's Deception, so the game plays practically the same as previous installments, and none of the small issues have been cleaned up. Given this game's production values, this is surprising.

The gameplay can be sloppy at times. Aiming feels jerky, which makes hitting enemies at longer ranges needlessly difficult. The guns are weak and need too many shots to kill someone. There are instances where enemies spawn behind you and can kill you before you know they're there. There was one level where I cleared a ballroom full of enemies from my starting place, below a balcony. As soon as I ran out into the room proper, I was immediately fired upon by three snipers and a grenade launcher guy up on the balcony. This kind of level design is incredibly frustrating. Enemies don't always react to bullets like they should. This is fine for the average mook, but when you're confronted with a giant toting a belt-fed machine gun and absurd amounts of health in an area with little cover and you can't tell if you're damaging them or not, something's wrong. Platforming fares better, but the game's prettiness can make it hard to tell what's a grabbable ledge and what isn't.

You might say that the series is about setpieces instead of gameplay, but the setpieces don't fare much better. They always want you to act a certain way, and their artificiality is sometimes very obvious. The most glaring for me was when the ship begins sinking: it begins tipping over, everything sliding dramatically across the floor — and then it stops for you to have a gunfight, and starts up again as soon as everyone's dead. Another instance is when the boxes are falling out of the plane; I was on top of one before it was out, and could've jumped into the plane had the game not said, "NO! You're not supposed to do that!" My favorite setpiece was the simplest: horses chasing a convoy. No needless funneling, no flashy effects, just jumping from horses to trucks and killing enemies.

That said, none of these are actual deal-breakers. The game holds up fairly well as an action title and nothing is genuinely bad; they could just use some more polish. It'll hold your attention for quite a while, and is above average, but don't expect anything absolutely phenomenal.
  # comments: 2
flag for mods
Uncharted 3 - Reviews for newbies and veterans
If you are a regular with the franchise, this is all you need to know. If not skip to the bottom 1) It looks even better than before. More and more I needed to just stop and stare and take it all in. 2) They've screwed around with Elena's design and it will irritate you through all the wonderful story moments with her in it. 3) For some reason, the starting menu sucks completely and there are less options. 4) This is the fire world, to 1's Jungle/Waterworld and 2's Snowworld 5)They've messed around with melee again. This time it feels bigger and more cinematic but is way more dangerous to use in actual combat. 6) The melee system is used again and again, it kinda works 7) More unstable floor action! 8) No annoying end-game boss fight 9) The mystical element isn't such a pain in the arse to fight and feels less out of place 10) Charming story, noticeable plothole 11) Crotch-jumping! 12) Everything feels a little more disjoint and unconnected 13) The AK-47 is no longer the default rifle! 14) On the other hand, the M6 still is 15) At some point in the game, someone will dangle from a ledge and be gripped at the last second by someone else

Other than that, it's the same game. I preferred the characterisation in 2, but enjoyed the supernatural element much more in 3, there was some pretty cool mindscrew scenes. If you loved the others there's no reason to not love this


If you don't know the Uncharted franchise, it looked at every thriller and adventure flick and said, why can't we make this more awesome? And so they did. Popcorn entertainment with basic everyman characters who are easy to fall in love with and an incredibly good mix of cover-based fighting, climbing and stunning reactive environments. Climb over beams and jump over girders, to out manoeuvre your enemies and take them down with a swift headshot in the middle of a breaktakingly beautiful French château _as it burns to the ground_. Fight on a ship as it's rocked from side to side by the waves sending you and the bad guys falling. This is the Indiana Jones of our times. It's standalone but there's no reason for you not to go out and play the first two first, it's cheaper and none of them have aged. The grenade system will get better!
  # comments: 0
flag for mods
Modern day Dime Novel
In the late 19th century, there was the Dime Novel. Novels about heroes, all exclusively male, who traveled the world, got into danger in exotic countries, and sometimes rescued the Damsel In Distress.

Just before the mid 20th century, there was the serial movie. The film equivalent of the Dime Novel.

Now, we have Uncharted. Whether an intentional tribute or not, it very much brings the Dime Novel into the early 21st century and updates its tropes perfectly to fit the times, while also subverting many of them.

Nathan Drake is a man who's seeking treasure in faraway places, getting into danger that's way over his head. Elena Fisher is the Damsel In Distress... or maybe not! She can handle a gun herself, even if she's not as skilled as Drake, and in addition to working side-by-side, the two sometimes get separated, and sometimes rescue each other from danger. The many locations are classic Dime Novel exotic locales, though updated - there is no Darkest Africa here or offensive portrayals of natives, but instead, modern enemies include modern day pirates, mercenaries, and a madman's hired army.

While the characters are archetypes - the Intrepid Reporter (Elena), the Adventurer Archaeologist (more or less Drake), the Femme Fatale (Chloe), the Dirty Old Man (Sullivan) - they all have well-written dialog, fun interactions, and other aspects of their personality that evolve them beyond their basic archetype. After a while, you come to see them as fleshed out individuals and not the simple flat characters that Dime Novels were filled with. And of course, the vast differences in lifestyle and culture between the age of the Dime Novel and today are also taken into account, as characters use walkie-talkies to communicate, plots concern war criminals wanted by the UN, and all technology is modern, as are the character relationships and gender interactions.

This is the modern-day playable Dime Novel. The current incarnation of a genre more than a hundred years old. It is also the Spiritual Successor to the film serials of the 30s and 40s. And in the middle of war games, fantasy adventures, and gritty, dark-themed games all around, Uncharted is a breath of fresh air with its beautiful locales, toned-down PG-13 rated violence and language, and original setting and theme.
  # comments: 0
flag for mods
back to article
TV Tropes by TV Tropes Foundation, LLC is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available from thestaff@tvtropes.org.
Privacy Policy