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Not without flaws, but still the best end-times series I've read
Up to this day, no one has dared to bring us what amounts to a complete fictional blueprint of the times leading to Christ's second coming. Not that it doesn't have its flaws, like its writing and some possible theological errors, but overall it brings the whole matter of the Tribulation down to a very personal level, concentrating mostly on its main character Rayford Steele as he goes through hell on earth after his wife and son are taken in the Rapture, and with the second main character Buck Williams trying to make sense of it all for more than just trying to get a good story to write about. Trying to connect the global and the cosmic to the personal is no easy task, and yet I get the sense that the local world of the heroes connects with everything else that's going on. As for calling the Tribulation Force The Pirates Who Dont Do Anything, I think it's doing them a major disservice if one doesn't take into account that as newly-born Christians, they have to take their orders from God and can't just do their own thing for La Resistance, although Rayford does try doing his own thing in regards to Nicolae Carpathia, the book's main villain.
The problem with the non-acting heroes is usually stated as a problem with the series' premise. If You Cant Fight Fate, you've got protagonists who don't achieve anything. If the heroes don't achieve anything, you can't really root for them in any meaningful way. When you have several books of that, Darkness Induced Audience Apathy opens up pretty badly.
comment #16104 doctrainAUM 12th Sep 12
I think saying 'not that it doesn't have its flaws' is papering over a canyon in this place. I read one when I was a young Christian(not that I've gotten much older :D) and assumed all the books in a christian bookstore were going to be good books to read (if not in quality, in content) and I reread it and realised it was that the content was pretty hateful. Not much 'Love your enemies, do good to them which hate you, 28 Bless them that curse you, and pray for them which despitefully use you.' 'Do not resist evil, but if someone strikes you on the cheek, offer him your other also' going on

I mean we're talking flaws like the line which is probably the most awfully bad piece of writing I have and will ever encounter in my life. A nurse who says she's sad that all the babies in the world have disappeared because now she can't perform abortions.

Uck the badness of that thought, there is not a line in existence that has put up a bigger wall between itself and every human being it disagrees with. That is a line that refuses to even attempt empathy with anyone who isn't exactly following that lines logic. Love? It refuses to even believe that that nurse is a human being, that is capable of rational thought, or positive emotion.
comment #16112 Tomwithnonumbers 13th Sep 12
You know something is horribly wrong when a book series that creates a severe "us or them" mentality and fails at everything (including christian mythology) is considered to "connect the personal to the transcendental" by a delusional reviewer.
comment #17622 Peryton 9th Jan 13
T Hing is... If the heroes aren't supposed to stop the plans of the antichrist, then the antichrist seems less evil. If his plans are evil, then why aren't Rayford and friends supposed to stop them?
comment #17887 MichaelKatsuro 29th Jan 13
No, no, this is NOT an accurate depiction of the end times. First off, the rapture is NEVER mentioned in the bible, the antichrist is only mentioned ONCE in the bible (and is most likely supposed to be a plural than a singular being) and good lord there's just so much else wrong....
comment #22454 LitleWiggle 10th Dec 13
No, no, this is NOT an accurate depiction of the end times. First off, the rapture is NEVER mentioned in the bible, the antichrist is only mentioned ONCE in the bible (and is most likely supposed to be a plural than a singular being) and good lord there's just so much else wrong....
comment #22455 LitleWiggle 10th Dec 13
Not quite. The rapture IS mentioned, but in 1 Thessalonians 4:17, not in Revelation. As for the Antichrist, he is simply referred at "the beast" in Revelation, while "antichrist" is used as a general team in John's letters as someone who opposes Jesus.
comment #22457 Tuckerscreator 10th Dec 13
Granted, the term "rapture" is usually used in relation to the philosophy of Premillenialism, which did not gain prominence until the 1800s.
comment #22458 doctrainAUM 10th Dec 13
Thing is, the beast is just that: The beast. The antichrist in premillienial dispensationalism evangelical sermons is just a grab bag of all the predicted false prophets and other deceivers presented as one single person, then said to be the beast.
comment #22469 LitleWiggle 12th Dec 13
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