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The Amazing Spider Man back to reviews
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An improved, streamlined, and grounded foundation
The Amazing Spider-Man reminds of when I got my new laptop. First I complained it wasn't needed, then saw the flaws coating the old one, & when the new one came found it not too different, but appreciated the little touches & improved interface. It was about the same thing, but streamlined.

The best fix is throwing out the convoluted romance tangle that bogged down the previous trilogy. Here, Peter Parker and Gwen Stacy just have a mutual crush, find each other cute, share mutual interests, try dating, and have fun together! There's no melodrama or forced "deep love" theme, just a relationship where two teenagers like each other. Also improved is that Gwen knows Peter's identity, the prime emotions-wringer last time. Andrew Garfield and Emma Stone have great chemistry, and the subtext that they're dating in real life certainly assists. This new couple beats the banal "Pete-MJ" by a mile.

But Dr Connors is mixed. As soon as he gives "a world without weakness" speeches, you know the guy could fall to the dark side in his sleep. The sudden drop of the Parental Abandonment angle also cut him from more development, leaving just a mad scientist with a lizard motif. But the Lizard itself is better than I expected. I was unsure how creative fights with a lizard foe would be versus, say, a man with mechanical limbs, but Lizard's hook is that he can burst out to attack whenever he wants, making him a credible threat throughout. He also can still talk, which may spice up the fights, except it's always the same rhetoric, so still not much to it. Better than the goofy Goblin, though. Rhys Ifans does give Connors a certain regality.

Webb's grounded world is much better than Raimi's often cornball setting, and the funny now blends better with the serious. There's no character I can fault except Rajit Ratha, who sadly is just "evil Indian guy" and in the words of Rifftrax, who put "crucial lines of exposition in the mouth of an actor with an accent so thick"? But Uncle Ben wasn't one note like I expected, and I hoped he'd get to stick around for the whole film.

The webflight feels more acrobatic now, and injuries are now believable and cut Spidey's ability. Oscorp's a cool mysterious building I hope the sequels explore. And I love how New York pitches in to help Spidey at the climax. You'll see how.
After I saw this film, I was surprised that there was a lack of reviews compared to other big movies, and thought that I would write my own. However, that'd be redundant now, because you basically echo my exact sentiments. We disagree in a couple places (mainly on the matter of Dr. Connors; I thought his motive was understandable but misguided, which made him compelling), but you were able to explain your points well enough that I can't say it's wrong.
comment #15268 MFM 7th Jul 12
Thanks for the compliment! Looking through the page for this movie now, I see there were some places where they tried to make Connors more sympathetic, Unfortunately, the key one seems to be the scene where he objects to Dr. Ratha about early human testing, which didn't make much of an impression on me because 1. he backpedals out of this view in the very next scene & 2. I couldn't understand a word Rajit Ratha was saying. That's bad when a half-lizard man can speak more clearly than you can.
comment #15270 Tuckerscreator 7th Jul 12
Connors never backpedaled out of his views against human testing; he acted out of desperation because he was about to lose his chance to have his new arm at all. He wanted to do more trials on the rodents and observe the effects a bit longer before testing on human subjects, whereas Ratha was going to disguise it as a flu shot and expose countless war veterans to it after the first signs of success. Testing it on himself was one part panicking over the prospect of losing it entirely and two parts trying to stop Ratha by going, "Hey, look at me, I'm a human trial, you don't have to potentially massacre dozens of war heroes!"
comment #15352 TobiasDrake 13th Jul 12
Yup, that'll be clearer to me next time I watch it. Like I said, I couldn't understand half the conversation in that scene, so it got heard as "No, I won't test on people." "Ii jast cut yoor fuhnding." "Never mind."
comment #15356 Tuckerscreator 13th Jul 12
I feel like they just missed a segment with Connors, the start was fine, the end was fine, we just needed a bit in the middle where he went from one to the other. I'd buy that the experiment messed up his brain and that the power was addictive (apparently what Ifans * was trying to do). We just need some scene in the middle where that actually happens. Maybe they were there and just got cut
comment #15369 Tomwithnonumbers 14th Jul 12
Kinda like Doc Ock in 2, I think. Started nice, then goes mean with one bad mistake, needed a little more transition time in the middle. His acting was good, but his writing was lacking. Split personalities seem to be goldmines for Jumping Off The Slippery Slope. Now that I think about it, Sandman seems to be the only Spidey movie villain that doesn't have a split personality! (Uncle Ben's killer doesn't count.)
comment #15385 Tuckerscreator 14th Jul 12
The best fix is throwing out the convoluted romance tangle that bogged down the previous trilogy. Here, Peter Parker and Gwen Stacy just have a mutual crush, find each other cute, share mutual interests, try dating, and have fun together! There's no melodrama or forced "deep love" theme, just a relationship where two teenagers like each other. Also improved is that Gwen knows Peter's identity, the prime emotions-wringer last time. Andrew Garfield and Emma Stone have great chemistry, and the subtext that they're dating in real life certainly assists. This new couple beats the banal "Pete-MJ" by a mile

Disagreed. While the Peter/MJ romance got convoluted, it at least was trying for conflict. Two kids who just like each other for no explicit reason is just boring. Sexual tension can be a good thing, people! And this romance falls into the same trap as the last: if the actors have chemistry together, the writers aren't going to bother to write the characters with any actual romantic chemistry!

Webb's grounded world is much better than Raimi's often cornball setting

'Cause comic book based movies ought to be grounded in reality.

And I love how New York pitches in to help Spidey at the climax. You'll see how.

Really? I thought that was the part everyone hates, like usual?

comment #15472 ManwiththePlan 21st Jul 12
I have no problem with romantic conflict. And I also hate it when the romantic interests fall in love too quickly, like in Contact or Thor. But I don't think that happened here. It's pretty clear that it's just a crush between them at first, and after the two are faced with the burden of being Spider-Man that it blossoms into love. It's also better that the romantic scenes with them aren't just for romance but often them trying to deal with the plot's issues together. So they have purpose, just with a romantic subtext.

Cause comic book based movies ought to be grounded in reality.

Look, my favorite superhero movie is The Avengers, where we get a enormous green rage monster who punches out two gods and an army. Certainly, I like realism because then I have to suspend my disbelief less. But I can like silly too. I just felt Raimi's could be too silly, like that woman who screams in the camera after she sees Doc Ock, or the Green Goblin's could be. I never said all comic books movies should be realistic. I just said this setting here was better in comparison.

Not sure what you mean by "like usual". I thought it was cool, because I've never seen a city pitch in to help a superhero like that. The part with the crane catching him was cheesy, but the scene as a whole I liked a lot.
comment #15474 Tuckerscreator 21st Jul 12
Meant to say "The Green Goblin's overacting" there.
comment #15475 Tuckerscreator 21st Jul 12
Not sure what you mean by "like usual". I thought it was cool, because I've never seen a city pitch in to help a superhero like that

Er, what??? Remember New York citizens throwing things at the Green Goblin? The train passengers helping Spidey and trying to defend him against Doc Ock? A city (not the entire city actually, just a good number of people) pitching in to help the superhero happened frequently in the Raimi movies, so the crane scene is hardly unique. And the "like usual" referred to those moments being considered cheesy too.
comment #15477 ManwiththePlan 21st Jul 12
Well, the one in number 1 was pretty quick, and throwing stuff is hardly on the level of a city-wide spreading out the cranes. And the train passengers in 2 were quickly negated, because Ock just shoved them all to the side. Cranes, on the other hand, is a pretty big feat.
comment #15478 Tuckerscreator 21st Jul 12
I liked the sequence, it was cheesy, but the whole thing leading up to it was brilliant. Also for a pretty average at best soundtrack they decided to use some awesome in that scene and only that scene?
comment #15484 Tomwithnonumbers 22nd Jul 12
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