Theatre King Lear Discussion

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LordGro
Topic
02:00:49 AM Dec 27th 2014
Both examples seem to be shoehorned: Cordelia is executed, and Edmund is killed by Edgar in a duel, so neither actually wins. Edmund is also a villain.
LordGro
Topic
01:50:15 AM Dec 27th 2014
Removed this for trope misuse. Cordelia *does* love her father; Lear just does not understand. In reality, there's nothing insulting or "brutal" about her answer.
  • Brutal Honesty: When asked to describe her love for her father, Cordelia simply says she loves him "According to [her] bond, no more nor less." Lear is too arrogant and vain to appreciate Cordelia's sincerity and disowns her.

LordGro
Topic
01:41:14 AM Dec 27th 2014
edited by 92.211.187.255
Removed this entry for trope misuse. Aluminium Christmas Trees is an element in a work from or about an older era which audiences interpret as fictitious, despite it being historically real (or plausible). Which has nothing to do with the ending of King Lear.
  • Aluminum Christmas Trees: The original ending proved so unpopular, that less than a century after it was first put on, most stage versions reworked the play to have a happy ending. While critics bashed it, the legend the play was originally based on virtually does have Cordelia live. In fact, her death was supposed to be a "twist" ending in Shakespeare's play.
    • Well, kind of. In the earliest versions of the story, Cordelia does survive and become Queen - only to be overthrown, imprisoned, and driven to suicide by her nephews. Whereas the Nahum Tate reworking had her marrying Edgar - a character Shakespeare had invented, so decidedly NOT going back to the original - and living happily ever after.
SeptimusHeap
01:46:36 AM Dec 27th 2014
The trope actually does not require "an older era", just that audiences believe that a real thing is fictional. I don't think this is a good example either way, though.
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