Series The X Files Discussion

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02:08:08 AM Jun 15th 2015
edited by Korbl
Mulder and Scully are very competent agents, but they seem particularly unwilling to exercise their authority. They let local police walk all over them rather than using federal clout, and in S 01 E 08, Ice, Mulder could have detained the possibly infected pilot in their capacity as an agent of federal law enforcement, but make no attempt to do so, instead trying to reason with a person they suspect to be infected by a parasite that evidently makes it's hosts irrational and aggressive.

Would this be an example of Police are Useless, or is it something else?
07:19:09 AM Jun 15th 2015
Idiot Ball I am thinking of.
01:47:48 PM Jul 7th 2014
Is the noodle incident example in the Myth Arc folder on the main page really a noodle incident?

"Noodle Incident: In season two, it's revealed that Scully has a key to Mulder's apartment. How this came about is never discussed. It's not known whether Mulder has a key to her apartment."

In all likelihood, he just gave it to her unceremoniously. Consider all the illegal shit they go through, they're always being watched/tailed/wire-tapped or almost-killed. They sleep odd hours and are frequently in danger even in the safest of places. It would be weird if his partner DIDN'T have the key to his apartment!

03:57:06 PM Jul 7th 2014
Agreed, it is stretching the concept of Noodle Incident. Not everything in a show is explained, but not everything unexplained is said trope.
11:29:40 PM Jul 7th 2014
Aye, that's too blink-and-you'll-miss-it. Pull that entry.
08:31:21 AM Apr 5th 2014
edited by

Removed from the description:

Another big problem with the show was that as with Buffy the Vampire Slayer, its initial popularity was mostly due to the simple fact that it had a lot of tropes which, at the time, either hadn't been subverted, or really explored at all. Once said tropes had been revealed, analysed, and subverted, their novelty vanished, and they became as old and boring as any others.

Tropes Are Tools (aka Tropes Are Not Bad). That text implies tropes = clichés. However, if you disagee with the removal, we can sort it out here and it could be put back.
10:23:04 PM Jul 7th 2011
Anyone object if I try and separate out tropes that characterize the series as a whole and/or the Myth Arc from the ones that apply to individual episodes? Like on the page for The West Wing, for instance?
11:22:03 AM Jun 29th 2013
I don't like it much. Especially as the page is getting bigger and soon it becomes necessary to split the page to sub-pages. It will be disorganized.

Also some tropes appear both in Myth Arc and in Mo TW episodes. I'd prefer to have these together. Or there is the issue of a trope appearing in a mythology episode, but is not actually recurring. Then there are episodes like "Wetwired" or "Red Museum" which have elements of both types.

I think having one ABC list would be neater and easier to work with.

It's also difficult for tropers who are casual fans of the show, or simply tropers who want to cross-wick an example without being familiar with the series at all.

There are pages that have trope lists organized by seasons, and it's a nightmare. One trope is listed on three pages instead of on one.
03:18:04 PM Mar 10th 2011
A lot of the tropes seem to take as gospel that the episode "Musings of a Cigarette-Smoking Man" was one hundred percent true... I you re-watch that episode, the last line where CSM says something like "I could kill you whenever I want, but not today" is directly from one of his pulpy would-be novels, strongly implying that Frohike was just reading some of CSM's rejected manuscripts (or whatever). Also, the fact that CSM doesn't assassinate Frohike (or Mulder or Scully) seems to indicate that the "facts" summarizing CSM's life weren't entirely true.
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