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ZombieAladdin
topic
02:55:38 PM Feb 13th 2013
edited by ZombieAladdin
Would One Piece itself be a Widget Series, albeit one with phenomenal popularity in its home country and substantial popularity overseas? Its main character is a pirate captain who stretches like rubber and hangs out with a talking reindeer, a cyborg, and a living skeleton; every character uses mollusks for all communication (and have become several key plot points); and so many weird situations and people have appeared in the series thus far that no one, Japanese or otherwise, can predict with any certainty what would happen next.

EDIT: Nevermind, it's on the list—just not in the alphabetized part.
TheXMJohnson
topic
08:49:49 AM Jul 23rd 2012
Would a strange multinational thing be a Weird Humorous International Project?
SonicLover
topic
06:38:01 AM Jul 14th 2012
Seriously, what is it about Japan that makes their culture so strange? Is there a radioactive meteor or something in the middle of Tokyo that warps the minds of anyone who's near it for too long?
ergeis
07:42:23 PM Oct 21st 2012
Because several weird games represents Japan just like how Jackass represents America or how Monty Python represents the UK's mental state. Yep, makes a lot of sense.
LucaEarlgrey
05:13:12 PM Oct 4th 2013
Cultural dissonance/shock. What seems strange to individuals of one culture may be perfectly normal for those of another culture.
feotakahari
topic
03:04:11 PM Sep 12th 2011
A while ago, GG Chrono cleaned up the examples. One of the examples he removed was this, which I think is valid:

  • The Knight Life, a Life Embellished webcomic with a tendency towards parody, is very much a WHAT. Such characters as a housewife who puts on an armless costume and fights crime as "The Masked Maggot," or a lowlife who works as a human rug and can identify shoes by how they press into his back, make sense if and only if one's familiar with the parts of American culture they're mocking.

I'll put it back for now, although I'm willing to discuss it.
RicaCriscia
topic
08:25:33 PM Mar 30th 2011
Will there be an acronym for a weird Korean thing?
DoktorvonEurotrash
04:24:52 AM Jul 19th 2011
Wicket?
CluelessColleague
05:03:29 AM Jan 13th 2012
No, that one's for Weird Canadian Things.
PKFL_531
topic
06:57:21 PM Jan 13th 2011
Should we get a new picture? This same picture is used in the Katamari Damacy page.
blackcat
moderator
topic
08:06:36 PM Aug 8th 2010
Moving this here:

Japan has a culture outsiders may find pretty strange. In ancient times, Japan was a tribal culture. After making contact with China, they became an "eastern" culture, adopting a lot of Chinese cultural baggage but changing it to suit themselves while keeping older beliefs such as animism. The same thing happened during the 19th century, when Japan became an industrialized "western" culture. These three layers of culture interact in fascinating and unusual ways.
blackcat
moderator
08:14:28 PM Aug 8th 2010
And this:

Exemplified by the Katamari Damacy video game series. Such games have also a noticeably larger presence on handheld systems than their console brethren.

Not to be confused with the animated series about an alien named Widget. Nor with the economic term (which is shorthand for an unknown unit of production. Product X, but economic slang). Nor with that thing floating in your Guinness.
blackcat
moderator
08:15:06 PM Aug 8th 2010
and this:

Spinoff terms you'll likely see in this page include WTF (A Weird Thing from France), WHAT (A Weird Humorous American Thing) or just WAT, Wabbit (Weird British Thing), Wicket (Weird Canadian Thing), STANZA (Strange Thing from Australia/New Zealand/Australasia), EIEIO (Excessively Irish Example of Intentional Oddity), and WIT (Weird Icelandic Thing).

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