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aurast
topic
05:14:52 PM Dec 9th 2014
Is the example from The Return of the King valid? Merry and Pippin merely followed Aragorn in charging the forces of Mordor, and the whole point of it was to distract Sauron. None of them seemed to spoil any tactics or strategy.
youfeelingluckypunk27
topic
08:15:19 AM Apr 3rd 2013
I was thinking maybe this could have another name, like "Impatient Combatant"?
SaltyWaffles
09:22:12 AM Sep 30th 2013
No. Seriously, no. "Impatient Combatant" is already vague and misleading with regards to the actual trope, and that's just the first practical reason. I don't even want to begin getting into all of the other reasons why.

SteveMarmot
topic
10:34:17 AM Oct 8th 2012
A new example might occur, but it's jsut from a game nobody ever ehard of ( i know since i and 3 more people are the only ones still playing in the entire world). In " Heroes of Ardania" , a fan-made browser-based text-adventure RPG based on Majesty, you can buy followers, or mercenaries to help you fight hard encounters. The game is based on luck. If you go somewhere, you dont know what you might encounter. Until you reach the encounter where you need your mercenaries to fight, your followers may have died in an earlier encounter because they're too stupid to stay behind. Despite the fact that you paid for them quite a lot and their stats sometimes show an Intelligence stat higher than your own, they rush head-first into battle and there's nothing you can do to stop them.
r1
topic
01:55:31 AM Apr 19th 2012
most of the examples don't really have plans, or the "leeroy" is the first to die while executing the plan, or just eager.
Golfball
topic
01:27:48 PM Apr 16th 2012
So, what trope applies if the following happens:
  • In a party, one member proposes (in absence of other details) that the other members cover the speaker, while the speaker looks like they're pulling a Leeroy. Bonus points if it is the group medic/cleric proposing this, rather than someone like the group tank.
  • Under a hail of fire, "Leeroy" runs up to the Big Bad Monster and attacks. Perhaps even gets smacked a time or two by the Big Bad, but it's not quite enough to put Leeroy down for a dirt nap.
  • The Big Bad falls over dead. The Leeroy reveals that it really was his plan for that to happen, and explains why. And takes a bow, because the plan really was quite clever.

MrDeath
03:16:21 PM Apr 16th 2012
Not everything is a trope.
AnsemPaul
02:30:33 AM Apr 19th 2012
Its a subverison, like this example on the page:

Subverted in an issue of Trinity. The heroes are sent to the Mirror Universe, and decide to liberate it. While Batman and Wonder Woman are trying to come up with a plan, Superman storms the Crime Syndicate's base. At first, the others think he did an idiotic move, but Supes beats them all and delivers their unconscious bodies. Superman explains that he deduced that the evil counterparts had grown complacent, as they had been ruling their world without any challenge for years. Also, as they killed their enemies right away, they never developed any real combat experience, while Superman did, since he always fights enemies who have an intent to kill him over and over again. It also helped that he, Batman, and Wonder Woman had had a mind-link put on them that allowed Supes to draw upon their skills and abilities.
VVK
topic
04:36:01 AM Dec 13th 2011
Wait, it looks like the definition was changed to no more apply to video games only? (There was a discussion about that, but I missed the conclusion.) Complain here if I wasn't right — but I'm going to go change the description in one place so that it doesn't imply this doesn't apply in-story.
RTanker
topic
10:27:11 PM Aug 13th 2011
Just a random thought, but since, in the original incident, Leeroy Jenkins survived and the rest of the party died, who was the real fool? Or to put it another way, who's the more foolish, the fool or the fool who follows him?
TwoGunAngel
04:54:53 AM Dec 13th 2011
Leeroy didn't survive, actually. There were two paladins in the group (Leeroy and Chrysm), and both of them used Divine Intervention (which kills the paladin that uses it) on Spiffy and Therien, who soon found that they "couldn't cast with that shit on." This was part of the original plan that the group had at the start of the vid, which is actually the last thing you want to do in the Rookery — fear rotation isn't going to help you when it comes to respawning eggs (you actually want to hatch as few of them as possible) and Divine Intervention is completely wasted on mages, in addition to taking a character with the ability to heal and tank out of the action for no good reason. Personally, I say both sides were stupid.
IndirectActiveTransport
07:16:53 PM Mar 29th 2014
Leeroy would have survived if he had not returned to carry out the plan. Everyone else would have died with or without him but Leeroy would have lived on his own.
azul120
topic
05:47:15 PM Aug 14th 2010
There doesn't seem to be anymore space for new edits on this page.
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