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Protagonist506
topic
02:59:54 AM Aug 10th 2014
Would deliberate values dissonance be an inversion?
SeptimusHeap
03:07:53 AM Aug 10th 2014
No, the inversion would be that something which was considered unacceptable back in times it was made has now become acceptable.
CaptainCrawdad
topic
12:38:54 PM Jul 25th 2014
Removed:

  • Today Disney's The Little Mermaid is considered by some to be rather cringe-worthy, as its heroine is a girl who abandons her family and her home for a guy she hardly knows. At the time, though, Ariel was written by Disney to be a proactive girl, following after the more passive and demure Snow White, Cinderella, and Aurora. She also was the first Disney princess to set out and win the heart of the guy she loved, rather than have him show up and carry her off. And she was also the first Disney princess to save the life of her prince, twice (not that doing so does her any favors).

Ariel expresses an obsession with going on dry land before meeting the prince. The prince just gives her the call to adventure to do something about it.
trims
topic
11:54:59 AM Jun 28th 2013
Question here:

In the context of film / literature / media in general, I definitely see that the restrictions of working within a censorship system can put *very* hard boundaries on exactly how "fair" a work can be, and thus, we should note those works which manage to subvert this even a little bit.

However, particularly in real life, I'm not particularly OK with calling stuff "fair for its day" if it didn't take a *significant* step outside the mainstream. Being a little more nice than normal isn't noteworthy. That is, the standard should be that a person at the time would remark that the work/act was quite unusual. A meta example: in a segregated society, running a restaurant that serves a single race is the norm. Having workers of a different race in that business isn't noteworthy. Even allowing them to eat in the restaurant after hours ISN'T "fair". Having a special sections where customers of each race could eat during normal business hours *might* qualify, depending on how rare in the society it was. Serving all races, but being preferential in treatment to certain ones (e.g. whites get served first, etc.) WOULD be "fair for its day"

There are a couple of examples in the Real Life that I'd like to erase, which illustrate my concerns:

The Iranian option of allowing homosexuals to gender flip rather than be executed is definitely NOT this trope. That's a punishment virtually identical in severity (it boils down to "chop off your genitals or we kill you"), and, while it is *slightly* less evil than death, it's certainly not a punishment that is in line with much of the rest of the world.

W/R/T slavery: tales of individuals treating their slaves better than the "work them to death" aren't this trope either. Large percentages of slaveowners (particularly in the North Americas and Old Europe, though less so in the Caribbean) in fact weren't sadists, and, while they considered their slaves property, they were *valuable* property to be taken care of with commensurate care. In order to qualify for this trope, IMHO, a slaveholder must have stepped very much outside the normal treatment zone, such as freeing them or providing them treatment close to normal freeman status.

Comments?

Xilizhra
11:40:16 AM Feb 24th 2014
Agreed. In fact, I'm beginning to think that this whole page should be purged of examples.
SeptimusHeap
11:42:20 PM Feb 24th 2014
edited by 82.130.73.35
An example cut would have to be offered in Trope Repair Shop. I'll offer it up in the Real Life section maintenance topic.
Polynices
topic
10:47:49 PM Mar 1st 2013
edited by Polynices
Looks like a pedophile trying to normalize their evil got to this page. There's a few references to a "little girl lover" which I guess is pedo slang for child rape. I'll try to hack out all the references but seems discussion is in order for edits that big.

EDIT: Doing some more reading around the wiki and wondering if I'm supposed to flag this for review rather than do the edits myself?
Telcontar
moderator
01:23:40 AM Mar 2nd 2013
You can go here to get help with further edits/ask people to go over the page.
Premonition45
topic
03:33:00 PM Sep 26th 2012
Do you think this trope is related to Seinfeld Is Unfunny? It seems that way to me.
Protagonist506
02:58:57 AM Aug 10th 2014
Technically it could be so. It's more like "To Kill a Mockingbird is Unrevolutionary"
vifetoile
topic
02:49:17 PM Sep 29th 2011
The punctuation of the title is wrong. It should be "Fair for Its Day," not "It's". It's = It is, and Its is possessive. Can that please be fixed?
Tyoria
09:20:39 PM Oct 12th 2011
I cringed when I saw that. I put in a request today, otherwise we might have to take it to the main forum.
Tyoria
09:25:59 PM Oct 12th 2011
And five minutes later... Fair for Its Day. TY, mods!
johnnye
06:12:09 AM Oct 23rd 2011
edited by johnnye
I'm still seeing FairForItsDay automatically appearing as "Fair For It's Day" (e.g., on Noble Bigot). Any way to change this?

EDIT: And why, for God's sake, does [[FairForItsDay Fair For Its Day]] still show up as "Fair For It's Day"?
mlsmithca
09:46:50 AM Nov 5th 2011
edited by mlsmithca
The best workaround I've found for people who cringe when "its" and "it's" are confused is to write it as Fair For Its Day, or a similar split between "Fair" and "For" or "Its" and "Day". Should work until a permanent fix is in place (I've sent a report to the mods, and perhaps I'm not the only one to have done so).
Etherjammer
topic
08:35:05 PM Apr 18th 2011
Removed:
  • Further, the "eye for an eye" is very, very widely misunderstood. The full text reads "He who shall cut with the bronze lancet, and cause another to lose his eye, shall lose his own eye in penalty." It was a punishment for medical malpractice.

...because it's not true. The troper's confusing two different laws. Law 196:

  • If a man put out the eye of another man, his eye shall be put out.

Law 218:

  • If a physician make a large incision with the operating knife, and kill him, or open a tumor with the operating knife, and cut out the eye, his hands shall be cut off.

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