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Candi
topic
10:41:27 PM Jan 27th 2013
"The popular belief that southern California will drop into the sea during the "Big One", which spawned its own trope.... There's also the fact that people are apparently expecting it to neatly break along the state boundary."

Ow. I can understand a Did Not Do The Research on California 'dropping off' rather then a new canyon or island happening. But expecting a split along the man-made state border rather then the fault line? Ow ow ow. My head hurts.

I can't remember the title, but I've heard of a Harry Turtledove Alternate History where North America split along the Appalachians and everything east of the split drifted east and south, to become a mini-continent in its own right. I don't know enough about plate tectonics to know if that's plausible or this trope.
Westrim
10:52:44 PM Jan 27th 2013
Land masses can't split a mountain range in two like that; they aren't a zipper, they're a lump, where layers of the earth folded over each other or subducting material rose through volcanism.
Chalkieperfect
topic
05:10:53 PM Sep 6th 2012
Request for help: The entry for the movie "The Crack in the World" contains a No Content Example followed by a Justifying Edit. The justifying edit claims that the errors in the movie are a case of Science Marches On, because the movie came out around the time plate tectonics was gaining acceptance among geologists.

That movie depicts a "crack" in the earth's crust that cuts off a section of the planet's surface, which then rises and slowly levitates into up into space before the characters' eyes. Now, I don't know all that much about plate tectonics, but I am quite certain that 1960s geologists did not believe that sections of the earth's crust could hover away like this.

I'm adding this to the discussion page because I don't recall enough about either the movie or my college geology class to feel competent fixing this problem, but the entire entry should be replaced with an actual description of the movie's faulty geology (without the attempt to justify it). If no one else wants to make the repair, I will give it my best shot.
Westrim
01:27:13 PM Sep 11th 2012
Just use what's already there.
Offle
topic
03:20:08 PM Jul 30th 2011
edited by Offle
Would Wither, the first book of the Chemical Garden Trilogy by Lauren De Stefano, work for this trope? In the book North America is the only land mass left because the government supposedly destroyed the other continents. It completely ignores the fact that something on that scale would probably destroy North America too or at least cause a ton of damage to the various systems of the earth and throw everything out of wack.

Sorry if I'm supposed to add then ask, I'm kind of new to adding things on here.
muninn
topic
02:17:04 PM Jul 17th 2011
I removed The Core and Twenty Twelve from the film examples list. I am not disputing that those are examples, but the entries were nonexplanatory (and, in The Core's case, nattery).

If anybody with a greater familiarity with those works could add them back in with an explanation as to how they are examples, it would be much appreciated.
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