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Filby
topic
12:25:00 PM May 9th 2012
edited by Filby
"Le Guin returned to the series years later with additional books, but... see below."

See below about what? As someone who's never read any of the Earthsea books, I have no idea what this refers to. Someone should spell it out in the main description.
Telcontar
moderator
04:00:28 AM May 10th 2012
Zapped. It makes no sense to me either, and I've read all of Earthsea several times.

The description needs some general work too, but I'm not up to that; there isn't any plot summary.
Arivne
topic
11:51:45 PM Aug 28th 2011
Deleted the Spoiler Warning on Living Shadow: A Wizard of Earthsea came out in 1968 (43 years ago) so the Statute of Limitations applies.

Made even worse because the entire example is spoilered. Original version:


  • Living Shadow: What Ged summons up and then must deal with in the first book.

Filby
12:24:19 PM May 9th 2012
edited by Filby
(meant to start new thread, sorry)
Camacan
moderator
topic
11:21:34 PM Jan 31st 2011
This one is arguable but probably wrong, or in strong need for clarification. Despite the name, Path of Inspiration means "An evil church disguised as a good church." What might be meant is the cult of the Nameless Ones is an evil church disguised as a good one — I don't know why the Karg's God Brothers were bought into it.

  • Path of Inspiration: The Kargish religion shown in the second book of the series is actually under the control of evil spirits, and its doctrine against wizardry is intended to prevent any magic user from vanquishing these forces.
    • Uh, What? It is a small and feared cult worshipping things called variously the Dark Ones or the Nameless Ones who live in a vast labyrinth and tomb that probably wasn't made by humans and accept regular sacrifice and hate the light. There's no control, only fear. The Kargish religion proper, as espoused by their God Kings, worship the "God Brothers", who are quite different to the nameless ones at Atuan and have largely stolen all their worship. They hate wizardy because it is a power not subject to their control.
Camacan
moderator
topic
11:18:21 PM Jan 31st 2011
edited by Camacan
While the quotation is correct and it's a belief held at one point in the work, it is not true that only one gender can do magic, so the citation is probably misplaced.

  • Gender Restricted Ability: In the original trilogy, only men can become truly powerful magic-users.
    • That's a later Retcon. Akaren was stated to be skilled enough - once.
    • They have a saying, Weak as women's magic, wicked as women's magic.
    • There were, at one time, a few women Masters on Roke, but they were all kicked out and replaced by men long before Ged landed there.
    • It may be a self-fulfilling requirement: girls are never taken to Roke, after all. It is notable that Serret from A Wizard of Earthsea is capable of quite complex magic including Changing, presumably without spending her adolescence studying under masters of wizardry.
Camacan
moderator
topic
11:15:19 PM Jan 31st 2011
This is probably an incorrect citation based on an over-literal reading of the title but not the article. The trope is "Non-native is better at being a native than the natives are." So an inversion would be something like "Native is better at being a non-native than the non-natives natives are." Basically the same trope. We don't mean only whites can do magic.

  • Mighty Whitey: Inverted in that the peaceful learned magic users that inhabit virtually the entire archipelago are dark skinned, while the warlike Kargish barbarians are Nordic in appearance and are confined to four (admittedly rather large) islands on the edge of the map.
    • Le Guin complained that Ghibli made everyone look white, something which she'd tried very hard to fight over the years; she eventually learned the reason and gave them somewhat grudging forgiveness. As for the live film...

Camacan
moderator
topic
11:13:15 PM Jan 31st 2011
Early expectations that the Kargs may turn to to be Fantasy Counterpart Vikings seem to be generally unfufilled as the series progresses.

  • Fantasy Counterpart Culture: Kargs = Vikings
    • In A Wizard of Earthsea, perhaps. But as expanded upon in The Tombs of Atuan, they're a militaristic theocratic empire, ruling some of the largest landmasses in the archipelago and being the only blonde haired, pale-skinned people in Earthsea. They don't have any clear counterpart.

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