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Total posts: [115]
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Let us do Science!:

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This seems as good a spot as any for us to talk shop. Ask questions, get answers, point out new and interesting papers, consider new research, talk about cool demonstrations and how to go about building them...

The possibilities, as they say, are endless.
Sakamoto demands an explanation for this shit.
 2 Runic, Sat, 26th Jun '10 7:05:24 PM from Here and Now
Like, science and science only, or physics, etc included?
"Well, it seemed like a good idea at the time..."
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The question doesn't really make sense. Physics is a science.
Sakamoto demands an explanation for this shit.
 4 Runic, Sat, 26th Jun '10 7:30:51 PM from Here and Now
Eh, nevermind..
"Well, it seemed like a good idea at the time..."
rrrrrrrrr
Hmm... should I start off by, say, digging up demonstrations of electromagnetic effects? Ring cannons and Tesla coils, that sort of thing?
Sakamoto demands an explanation for this shit.
 6 Ozbourne, Sat, 26th Jun '10 8:09:45 PM from the x on a treasure map Relationship Status: Staying up all night to get lucky
8luh 8luh.
Ooh, science. The sciences were pretty much my best subjects in school, especially biology and chemistry.

Anyway, I am on kind of a "dry ice is awesome" kick right now. Not just because it looks cool and mad science-y, but it's just interesting to me. I wish I could get my hands on some (er, not literally get my bare hands on it, you know what I mean.)
The statement below is true.
The statement above is false.
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Well, yes. While you can, I wouldn't recommend prolonged contact. :p

Any substance that sublimates at room temperature is pretty neat, really.
Sakamoto demands an explanation for this shit.
 8 Runic, Sat, 26th Jun '10 8:12:59 PM from Here and Now
Non-Newtonian fluids are fun.

Ooblik!

Also, There's this one liquid that turns into a spiky solid when an electromagnetic field is introduced...
"Well, it seemed like a good idea at the time..."
Ferrofluids. They are awesome.

 
 10 Deboss, Sat, 26th Jun '10 11:14:16 PM from Awesomeville Texas
I see the Awesomeness.
Is a ring cannon the same thing as a coil or Gauss gun?
 11 Runic, Sat, 26th Jun '10 11:18:59 PM from Here and Now
Yeah, Ferrofluid.

It's cool..
"Well, it seemed like a good idea at the time..."
YOU GOT FERROFLUID AND YOU GOT A MAGNET
FERROFLUID'S GOT MAGNETIC PROPERTIES BUT DON'T YOU GRAB IT
FERROFLUID MADE OF IRON
MAGNETIC IS THE FIELD

YOU GOT FERROFLUID AND YOU GOT A MAGNET
IF FERROFLUID STARTS TO MOVE IT'LL GET SPIKED UP
SPIKE UP MADE OF STEEL
FERROFLUID SHAPED LIKED DRILL

DON'T PUT FERROFLUID ON A PLATE
IT'LL USE MAGNET TO ESCAPE
IT'LL JUMP RIGHT UP AND DANCE AROUND
AND THEN THEY'LL CALL IT AAAAAAARRRRRRRRRRRTTTTTT

FERRRROOOOOOO FLUUUUUIIIIIIDDDDD
FERRRROOOOOOO FLUUUUUIIIIIIDDDDD

edited 26th Jun '10 11:29:28 PM by newtonthenewt

 13 Goggle Fox, Sun, 27th Jun '10 8:12:16 AM from Acadia, yo.
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Deboss: Yes, I believe so. Coil of wire in a column, put a ring down around the column to the base, then turn on the magnet slowly and cut power quickly.

The resulting change in field rockets the ring upwards. How fast depends on how conductive the material is. Copper works better than aluminum.

edited 27th Jun '10 8:12:51 AM by GoggleFox

Sakamoto demands an explanation for this shit.
 14 Deboss, Sun, 27th Jun '10 8:26:54 AM from Awesomeville Texas
I see the Awesomeness.
Nope, slightly different principle. Coil/gauss guns use a solenoid.
 15 Goggle Fox, Sun, 27th Jun '10 8:29:37 AM from Acadia, yo.
rrrrrrrrr
Solenoid = coil of wire. I'm sorry? The primary difference is that the solenoid is outside on a gauss gun, and inside on a ring cannon. Here I'll get a video if I can.

Edit: Found one.

There were an awful lot of these that didn't demonstrate just how far the ring flies up. By the way, aluminum rings will fly much farther when nitrogen-cooled.

edited 27th Jun '10 8:38:44 AM by GoggleFox

Sakamoto demands an explanation for this shit.
 16 Deboss, Sun, 27th Jun '10 9:06:35 AM from Awesomeville Texas
I see the Awesomeness.
Okay, yeah, my head's a little fuzzy right now. I thought it was using something else. I know we've got a host of them under Rail Gun.
...my physics teacher did that once.
I'm convinced that our modern day analogues to ancient scholars are comedians. -0dd1
 19 Meta Four, Fri, 2nd Jul '10 6:07:00 PM from mistletoe and molasses
AXTE INCAL AXTUCE MUN
Rhetorical question: On broadleaf plants, which side of the leaves do aphids prefer to feed on?

Answer: The majority of aphids feed on the bottom. This gives them shade, protection from rain, protection from the honeydew excreted by the aphids on the leaves above, and the raised veins on the leaf underside give a measure of protection from getting knocked off when leaves brush against each other in the wind.

Another question: On pecan trees, which side of the leaves do the aphids prefer to feed on?

Another answer: There are three aphid species normally found on pecans. Two of them, the black-margined aphid and the yellow pecan aphid, feed almost exclusively on the leaf bottoms. The third—and most economically important—species, the black pecan aphid, is funny: the adults prefer the bottoms, but the nymphs are split evenly between the top and bottom. This is not something that's been noted in the literature, but something I've observed and documented myself.

So the big question: Why do black pecan aphid nymphs feed on the tops of the leaves? That's what I'm currently trying to find out.

edited 2nd Jul '10 6:08:15 PM by MetaFour

Can predators see the nymphs on the top of the leaves? /clueless

 21 Meta Four, Sat, 3rd Jul '10 11:19:57 PM from mistletoe and molasses
AXTE INCAL AXTUCE MUN
The leaf tops are a relatively enemy-free space. In fact, that's my hypothesis for what's going on.

The predators responsible for the most aphid mortality are the lady beetles and lacewings. The literature I've found so far says that these and other arthropod predators primarily forage on the leaf bottoms. My own observations are consistent with this.

On the other hand, there are some aphid-attacking parasitoid wasps that search the leaf tops.

edited 3rd Jul '10 11:21:46 PM by MetaFour

 22 Goggle Fox, Thu, 8th Jul '10 3:57:54 PM from Acadia, yo.
rrrrrrrrr
Vaguely related, but very cool art inspired by biology: in video form.
Sakamoto demands an explanation for this shit.
 23 Tzetze, Thu, 8th Jul '10 4:09:29 PM from a converted church in Venice, Italy
 24 Tuefel Hunden IV, Thu, 8th Jul '10 4:21:27 PM from Wandering. Relationship Status: [TOP SECRET]
Watchmen of the Apocalypse
Anyone been keeping some tabs on the U.S. Navies rail gun weapon project?
"Who watches the watchmen?"
 25 Wicked 223, Thu, 8th Jul '10 4:24:54 PM from Death Star in the forest
Of course the humans had to be represented by war. We've never done anything else, amirite?

But still, that was very impressive.

edited 8th Jul '10 4:25:17 PM by Wicked223

You can't even write racist abuse in excrement on somebody's car without the politically correct brigade jumping down your throat!
Total posts: 115
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