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Complete Monster Cleanup Thread

Please see the Frequently Asked Questions and Common Requests List before suggesting any new entries for this trope.

edited 15th Jan '13 1:45:24 PM by Fighteer

The problem there is Light had other people on the 'get to them later' list, and even intended to get to lazy people. When Mikami brought this up, Light is only frustrated because

There's nothing he does that isn't spoiled by selfishness. Utopia Justifies the Means only works if one desires the utopia to make things better. Light wants it to create a world 'worthy' of him to be the God of. All of his motivations come down to "I am awesome."

I don't intend to argue it overmuch now, so let's move on

 12427 Hamburger Time, Fri, 3rd May '13 8:07:50 PM from Right behind you
Revenge of the Lemurs
I just remembered a couple more Marvel/X-Men characters who might be worth discussing, from the Too Good to Last series X-Statix. Now X-Statix was a strange little book in that its stars in any other book would not be good people at all; rather than being superheroes, they're Glory Hounds who essentially "play" superheroes on TV. However, they are quite sympathetic and do have something of a moral compass, and twice have to deal with a Mole in Charge problem, which are the characters I'm about to submit: the Coach and Mr. Freeman. Freeman is the owner of the team while the Coach is their manager, but both are utter balls of slime who repeatedly nearly destroy the team. They both deliberately set up team members to die on multiple occasions, the Coach to increase ratings, Freeman to cover up his shady business dealings (and by "shady" I mean "he sold Saddam Hussein the gas he used in his genocide of the Kurds"). Also the Coach is a rapist, and by the end of his arc he tries to kill the entire team once they learn what he did to their friends.
I'm going to join those saying no Death Note examples. While I personally don't think that Light had any good traits, he's ambiguous enough that including him would set a bad precedent, and nobody else measures up.

To those asking about Higuchi: Higuchi was the Third Kira. An uninspiring corporate drone, he was given the Death Note during the period when Light was amnesiac. He then uses it to kill his corporate rivals. Now, unlike Light, he clearly has no good traits or positive intentions. The problems however, are many. He's a pawn of Light's for starters (even if Light doesn't remember that at the time), and he never kills anywhere near the number of people that Light, Misa, Takada, or Mikami killed. Heck, Sociopathic Hero Mello may have hurt/killed more people, and he's at least nominally, on the side of the angels. Additionally, there's the problem of how Higuchi does business. He gather several likeminded individuals from the Yotsuba Group. They sit around the table and decide who to kill. Then, afterwards, Higuchi kills the people they've agreed to murder. This way he's able to keep his identity somewhat camoflaged (everyone in the group knows that one of the others is Kira #3, but none of them know which one). However, it also means that all the members of this little council are every bit as complicit as Higuchi.

With all that in mind, he's got to go. He may be the biggest jerk in the show, but he's overshadowed by Light, and does not distinguish himself at his own tier.

I could use more opinions on those film examples I posted on this page, and on The Beast from Berserk (same page).

[up]They sound like possibilities. Care to elaborate?

edited 3rd May '13 9:30:51 PM by AmbarSonofDeshar

I'll say cut 'em all

 12430 Hamburger Time, Fri, 3rd May '13 9:40:44 PM from Right behind you
Revenge of the Lemurs
[up][up] There's not much more to say, as the series didn't last very long. The Coach's wrongdoings are revealed first; the first issue of the series ends with almost the entire team being killed in a single page while fighting some assassins, and it's later revealed that the Coach hired the assassins to get rid of all the 'ugly' mutants on the team to increase ratings. The Coach then sends his Co-Dragons to get rid of the current team members when they find this out (but a guest-starring Wolverine takes care of them) and tries to rape Edie, one of the team members; she ends up shooting him.

Freeman sticks around quite a bit longer, but it's eventually revealed that the Serial Killer that is the team's current assignment was actually hired by Freeman to bump off everyone who knew about his deal with Saddam, including an honorary member of the team who is likely the only completely-good character in the series. The team leader, Guy, then breaks Freeman's neck, and that's the end of him.

edited 3rd May '13 9:41:36 PM by HamburgerTime

 12431 ACW, Sat, 4th May '13 1:03:18 AM from Arlington, VA (outside of DC) Relationship Status: Yes, I'm alone, but I'm alone and free
Complete Monster Editor and YMMVer
[up][up][up][up] They seem like possibilities.
 12432 randomtroper 89, Sat, 4th May '13 6:28:45 AM from The Fire Nation
I am the Phoenix King
I have an example that is way to long
  • Murder In Coweta County: A 1983 made-for-TV movie that told the true story of John Wallace, a wealthy Meriwether County, Georgia land baron, and moonshine runner who, in the 1940s, virtually ruled the county with an iron fist and had the sheriff in his back pocket. He had excessively sadistic and cruel methods of doling out physical punishment toward people who wronged him; for instance, at the beginning of the film, the sheriff catches a black farmhand stealing from Wallace; Wallace directs the farmhand to place his hands and feet in the jambs of the door, then slams the door shut on him repeatedly. (The "altruistic" side of Wallace, which he presented to the community in general, was a mere cover for his true, sinister side. For instance, he regularly attended church, was a member of the choir and church council, and paid for new pews out of his pocket.) The key incident in the film, which happens in April 1948, comes in the first hour of the movie: a sharecropper named Wilson Turner, who ran shine for Wallace, made a little too much money and made his runs a little too often; Wallace finds out and — after beating him severely — orders him off of his land. In retaliation (and perhaps knowing that Wallace would bury him in small-claims court, since Wallace had several judges in his back pocket), Turner steals a prized cow from Wallace's pasture. Sure enough, Wallace finds out and has Turner arrested, but then later decides to drop the charge "on a lack of evidence." Turner is let out of jail, but his freedom is short-lived, as Wallace and three of his thugs are waiting for him at the gas station. Turner hightails it, with Wallace and his buddies in pursuit, and the chase extends into Coweta County, where Turner's truck runs out of gas at the Sunset Tourist Camp; Turner tries to flee but is immediately caught and savagely beaten, creating a disturbance that draws several witnesses. As the men are trying to place Turner in one of the cars, witnesses reportedly saw Wallace pistol-whip Turner atop the head with such force that the gun discharged, likely killing him instantly. It was not good enough for Wallace to merely dispose of Turner's body in a deep well on his property, especially upon learning that hard-nosed Coweta County Sheriff Lamar Potts was investigating the case and — knowing the fatal blow was administered in the adjacent county — he had jurisdiction for the entire series of crimes involving Turner's death. So, Wallace directs two African American farmhands to help extract the body from the well, build a pyre, douse the body and wood with kerosene, moonshine, and gasoline...AND SET EVERYTHING ON FIRE!!!! Wallace cackles evily as he dares Potts to arrest him now, believing that the lack of a body will cast doubt on where Turner was killed. Wallace does not count on bone fragments and brain tissue (the few bits of Turner's body that remained after it was otherwise completely cremated) remaining in both the river and well, and that — plus the testimony of the two farmhands, Wallace's goons refusing to testify in his defense (they were to claim that Turner was still alive when brought back to Meriwether County), Potts persistence in gathering other evidence...and Wallace's own eccentric statement during the trial — led to an eventual guilty verdict and sentencing to death. Even in the last half hour before his execution Nov. 2, 1950, Wallace remains defiant, declaring himself (to an unimpressed Potts) the leader of "The Kingdom" and that he was taught to do everything without conscience or fear of the consequences. His last statement, made in the electric chair moments before his execution, is: "Almighty God, only You know my true heart. Prepare to receive me into Your House." Griffith's portrayal of the ruthless, sadistic, cold-hearted Wallace was critically acclaimed and showed just how callous, mean, and evil this outwardly Christian man truly was.
    • Follow-ups: the three men that helped Wallace beat Turner to death pleaded guilty as accessories to murder and were sentenced to life in prison; they each would be released after serving seven years. The Meriwether County sheriff — also an accomplice to murder — pleaded not guilty, but died before being brought to trial; a guilty verdict surely would have meant a life sentence, and removal from office.
This condenses it to make it more readable
  • Murder In Coweta County: A 1983 made-for-TV movie that told the true story of John Wallace, a wealthy Meriwether County, Georgia land baron, and moonshine runner who, in the 1940s, virtually ruled the county with an iron fist and had the sheriff in his back pocket. Wallace would brutally abuse his share croppers, such as the time he put a man's hands and feet in door jambs and slammed the door on them, all while appearing to be a kind charitable man. When Wilson Turner, who ran shine for Wallace, made a little too much money and made his runs a little too often; Wallace beats him severely and orders him off of his land. Knowing that Wallace had several Judges in his pocket, Turner steals a prized cow from Wallace's pasture. Wallace then has Turner arrested, released "on a lack of evidence", then ambushed at the gas station. Turner tries to flee but soon runs out of gas, and is beaten to death by Wallace and his thugs. When Wallace is finally arrested and sentenced to death, his last statement is: "Almighty God, only You know my true heart. Prepare to receive me into Your House."

 12433 ACW, Sat, 4th May '13 6:55:30 AM from Arlington, VA (outside of DC) Relationship Status: Yes, I'm alone, but I'm alone and free
Complete Monster Editor and YMMVer
[up] Too real life? Nice condensing though.

BTW: Speaking of X-Statix: http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/YMMV/XForce
I think I have a candidate for web origonal: Alex Timmons from Dexter Early Cuts, an animated web series that acts as a prequel to Dexter, showing us his "early cuts" (first victims). Alex Timmons was a sniper who shot and killed 3 civilian children in the war. No reason is given for why he did this other than for fun. He always liked to shoot children. Even before he became a sniper, he started off hunting as a kid, and liked to shoot young fawns instead of grown deer. He gives a Slasher Smile after killing a child. We see him observing a playground, likely intending to kill the children. Thankfully, Dexter kills him. The web series is much sorter than the actual series and around 3 minutes long, so you can look it up and judge him yourself.
 
 12435 Another Duck, Sat, 4th May '13 9:35:16 AM from Stockholm Relationship Status: Chocolate!
No, the other one.
[up]Any particular ones? I only saw things about Dexter, and several I couldn't watch in my country. From the description you gave he does seem to fit, though considering the nature of the show, I don't know if there are worse people.

edited 4th May '13 9:35:58 AM by AnotherDuck

Check out my fanfiction!
@Ambar: Agree with cutting Godzilla from Giant Monsters all out Attack for failing the heinous standard and Ivan Korshunov from Air Force One for having redeeming qualities. I believe we talked about Henry already. The consensus was he qualified but he needed a rewrite. I think Largo Quagmire gave a rundown of his deeds. Agree with removing everything about Slater, and I'm not sure his aunt qualifies either unless she intended to turn him into a Serial Killer. Finally, agree with cutting the Beast from Berserk since it fails the heinous standard and has questionable moral agency.

Re Death Note: Agree that no one in the series qualifies.

@12415: If Clu has the same Well-Intentioned Extremist motives as the movie then yes, cut. If Frollo's entry is a Zero-Context Example, cut him too.

@12427: On-the-fence. I don't know if they meet the general heinous standard of the Marvelverse.

@12432: While I agree that's a better write-up, I'm not sure the example counts since he only conducts one murder alongside some abuse.

By the way, Alderich Killian is listed on YMMV.Iron Man 3. Not saying he doesn't count (though that entry's pretty poor) but I know he was never discussed here before being added. Should we just cut him and wait a week or two before discussing him? I think Footsteps proposed a waiting policy like that a while ago. This way more people can actually see the movie, since it only came out a week ago internationally and came out just yesterday in the U.S.

edited 4th May '13 10:49:43 AM by OccasionalExister

 12437 Nohbody, Sat, 4th May '13 10:42:26 AM from Somewhere in Dixie Relationship Status: Mu
Just zis guy
^ I have no problems with waiting on considering CMs for IM3 a few weeks. I'm not all that certain he qualifies, anyway, but I haven't gone through the CM checklist to see about qualifications.

Also, cutting the CM entries in Schlock Mercenary, as no one has objected.
Yeah, let's enforce a waiting period there. We can discuss him soon and determine if he qualifies

 12439 nrjxll, Sat, 4th May '13 11:24:41 AM Relationship Status: Not war
Given the generally positive reviews Iron Man 3 has been getting, I think I'm actually going to take the rare step of seeing it in a theater. So I'd definitely appreciate holding off on discussions for now.

@Death Note examples: Higuchi's the only potentially solid keeper there. Rod Ross was certainly the most despicable person in that arc of the series (less redeemable than Knight Templar Mello or even Light who at least restrained himself from endangering his family) but he didn't really back it up with despicable actions beyond being a standard mob boss. I don't know about Matoba and it's zero context anyway. Takuo is the definition of Offscreen Villainy: he was just an Asshole Victim.

As for Light, I shall always hold to my belief that only by the last stretch of the series (when he had Mikami and Takada working for him) Light did become a Complete Monster. However, that might be too YMMV for the trope we're trying to define nowadays.

Also, while the Death Note did exert an evil Hellish force that corrupted him (like the one ring of power), it was all still Light's own personal issues it preyed off of, and Light's own choices to commit the heinous crimes he did. His heart was corrupted, but not his mind. Simply put, Light was always a bit of a born psychopath deep down, with an inflated ego, his own childish view of justice and self-centered sense of right and wrong. Had he not picked up the Death Note, he could've gone into the crime-busting business and been an amoral, somewhat insane detective like L, Mello, or Near. Instead, he got warped into The Sociopath he is for most of the series. The Death Note might have claimed Light's soul, but Light is responsible for knowingly and deliberately selling that soul in the first place. The series makes it clear (with characters like Misa, Mikami, Takada, Mello, and even a criminal in the Near-based bonus chapter) that while everyone can get influenced by the Note, only few are that inherently fucked up to take it far enough. Ryuk is in constant awe of just how far Light is willing to go with his murder sprees, and he and Near both note in the bonus chapter that most new Kiras wouldn't have it in them the same way Light did. (Or in Ryuk's words, the Kira sucessors are less "fun" than the original.) So in the end, Light is held more accountable for his deeds than the Shinigami or their Death Notes.

edited 4th May '13 11:53:05 AM by AnewMan

 
 12441 Very Melon, Sat, 4th May '13 1:34:51 PM Relationship Status: In Spades with myself
I am Groot
Anyone else want to comment on the Bakugan examples I brought up? Lightysnake was the only other person who gave a vote.
3DS Friend Code: 4382 - 2449 - 5707 IGN: Anthony
Agree with cutting all the Bakugan examples except for Mag Mel and Zenoheld.

edited 4th May '13 2:04:25 PM by OccasionalExister

I think we have enough votes to cut all the Death Note examples now and the one from Berserk. I'll also burn that Godzilla entry, and start trying to figure out what exactly to do with the other bad film ones.

In the meantime, I have a new character I would like to suggest: Yuri Grigorivich from the Dan Smith novel The Child Thief.

Who is Yuri? What has Yuri done?

The novel is set in 1930 in the Ukraine. Yuri is a veteran of WWI and the Russian Civil War. He misses the fighting, and so, in order to amuse himself, comes up with a way to get that rush back: he kidnaps a child or children from a village, and when the kid's friends and family come after him, he picks off the pursuers one at a time. It's a game he's played several times by his own admission, but the novel deals with a specific incident, so that's what I'll be describing.

Anyway, at the start of the book, the father of Yuri's two most recent kidnapees staggers into the village of Vyriv, dragging a sled on which are the corpses of his son and daughter, both killed and mutilated by Yuri. He himself has been shot by Yuri, and is near death. In the chaos that the man's arrival causes (the villagers think he is the child killer and lynch him) Yuri slips into town and kidnaps Dariya, niece of the novel's protagonist, Luka. Luka, Dariya's father Dimitri, and Luka's sons Viktor and Petro set off after him.

Over the course of the novel, Yuri proceeds to gutshoot Dimitri, leaving him to die a slow, agonising death. Luka notes that had Yuri wanted to, he could have killed Dimitri instantly, but instead he makes his death as slow as possible. He also tries and fails to kill Luka and his sons. When Yuri and his pursuers run into a Red Army detachment, he loses Dariya and Luka retrieves her; we discover then that Yuri has sliced away most of her right thigh and smoked it for eating later on. When Luka escapes from the Red Army, Yuri pursues he and Dariya, planning to regain ownership of her. He kills Petro the same way that he killed Dimitri and tricks Luka into killing an innocent soldier named Anatoly, before Luka puts him down. He admits, as he is dying, that after killing Luka and Viktor he planned to cook and eat Dariya.

Are his actions heinous by the standards of the setting?

Yes. The Red Army soldiers that we encounter are bastards, but none of them are as sadistic as Yuri, and most of them are disgusted by the idea of cannibalism. When the Red Army catches Luka and Dariya, the local leader, Lemerentov believes that Luka is the one who has mutilated Dariya, and plans to hang him for it. Lemerentov and Luka actually have a very good conversation about war, and what it makes people do; both of them find what Yuri has done to be vile beyond belief.

Does he have any redeeming traits?

No. Yuri's only sympathetic moments (when he is pretending to be a fellow prisoner in order to screw with Luka) are revealed to be lies. Beyond that he never shows concern for another human being, has no family or friends to speak of, and treats other people as targets. This is again contrasted with Lemrentov, who actually has some redeeming traits, and hates himself for what he has done for Stalin.

Freudian Excuse?

None. Yuri's a veteran, but there is no evidence of shellshock, and any other excuse is absent. It's worth noting that Luka is a Shell-Shocked Veteran for the Imperial, Red, and Black Armies, yet is nowhere close to the monster that Yuri is. Similarly, Lemrentov, who has Stalin in back of him, still has human feelings. Yuri has none of that.

Conclusion: I'd say add, but I'm curious as to the opinions of others.

I'll vote for that one[up]

[up][up]That's got my vote. A classic case of a sociopath who belongs on the page.

 12446 Another Duck, Sat, 4th May '13 4:49:15 PM from Stockholm Relationship Status: Chocolate!
No, the other one.
Kills and tortures people for kicks, cannibal, lies about the only redeeming traits he would have had... Well, I think he fits considering the setting is based on any kind of real life.

Is the story essentially about Yuri, or is there more to it? Though, I kind of doubt it would matter much, since if there would be anything that would overshadow him, that would be an even better candidate, which I assume there's not.
Check out my fanfiction!
[up]The novel is about our protagonist, Luka, chasing down the titular child thief (Yuri; whose name we do not know until much later on). Along the way, a lot of other things happen (Luka and his sons save a girl from the Red Army, Luka gets captured by the Red Army, Luka stages a jailbreak and saves all the other prisoners that the Red Army was holding) but the main thrust of the novel is always running down Yuri and getting Dariya back.

The only other villain of note is the aforementioned Lemerentov, a Red Army commissar who captures Luka about halfway through the book. Lemerentov, however, has standards, is horrified by Yuri's handiwork (which he thinks Luka is responsible for), and has a major Pet the Dog at the end when he lets Luka go. He's also fully aware of the fact that he is doing bad things, but with the High Command in back of him, and Stalin in back of them, he does not believe he has much choice. Yuri, in contrast, has none of those things going for him.

 12448 Another Duck, Sat, 4th May '13 5:12:00 PM from Stockholm Relationship Status: Chocolate!
No, the other one.
So essentially the other bad guys end up contrasting how horrible Yuri is?

Got a good writeup for it?
Check out my fanfiction!
[up]Pretty much. The other villains are engaged in some serious crimes, but its all on instructions from Stalin. None of them like doing it, and most of them are conscripts who just want to go home. Even Lementerov has no idea why he is being ordered to do the things that he is being ordered to do. He's unsure if he's a bad person who occasionally does good things, or a good person forced to do bad things, as he tells Luka at the end. Yuri on the other hand, is a psychopath who isn't taking orders from anybody, and continues to play his game because, and I'll quote here "Don't you miss it? The excitement of hunting another man? Fighting? Killing?"

And then there's this bit:

Luka: Exciting? Torturing a little girl? That's exciting to you? How many other children did you murder?

Yuri: Many. But she was going to taste so good.

Working on a writeup.

Have asked that the Death Note examples be removed from the anime subpage and that the one version of Godzilla, Ivan from Air Force One, and Slater from 3 all be cut from the film subpage. Removed The Beast from Berserk myself.

On the YMMV page for Godzilla, Space Godzilla is listed, in addition to Ghidorah and Gigan (whom we voted to keep) and Hedorah and Destoroyah (whom we voted to cut; they are gone now). This is one of the films I haven't seen. Anybody know if he actually belongs?

As previously noted, examples from 88 MM, The Condemned, and now that I check, A Serbian Film remain on the page. What were the votes on all of those?

edited 4th May '13 5:29:14 PM by AmbarSonofDeshar

 12450 Hamburger Time, Sat, 4th May '13 5:33:00 PM from Right behind you
Revenge of the Lemurs
[up] From what I remember...

8MM: Four [tdown] to Christian and Poole, two [tup] and two [tdown] to Velvet and Longsdale, and three [tup] and one [tdown] to Machine.

Condemned: Unanimous [tdown] to Saiga, unanimous [tup] to Breckel, and a dead split on McStarley due to the moment where he randomly acquires standards so the film can get on its soapbox.
Total posts: 29,986
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