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"Why Chinese Mothers Are Superior" lol:

Failed Comic Artist
Thats the thing though. I grew up in the countryside, with a ton of forests and crap, and I still wanted to watch TV and read comics and play video games. You know why? Because waltzing around in the forest with your family is fucking BORING!! You think kids watch cartoons because they have nothing better to do? No, its because cartoons are funny!
I dont know why they let me out, I guess they needed a spare bed
(For the comment about parents are lazy and let kids watch tv) Parents have to work, it's something I understood well when I was young. You want them to take you to the forest or you want to starve to death? They don't work, you don't get money, you don't eat food.

I think it's stunting to anyone to interact in the wider real world, the corporate/non-corporate/open-source environment if you never let them have any sort of entertainment. It's about being reasonable. Children watching tv is fine, it's a recreational activity. Letting them watch tv instead of doing their homework is wrong. Letting them watch tv until 3 am is wrong. Giving them extra work to do outside of school is fine. Forcing them to do 80 hours of robotic work per week is pointless. They have to learn good studying habits on their own, and you try to put it in at an early age. If they're not working by themselves by high school, they're going to be useless when they get to university.

 53 fanty, Tue, 11th Jan '11 9:10:14 AM from ANGRYTOWN
Woefully Ineloquent
"And remember, make sure your kids grow up in an environment sterile of entertainment to make SURE they become bitter and bookish".
TV and video games are not the only form of entertainment there is. The reason why object so much to them is mostly because of how insanely stupid most of that stuff is (I'm an elitist with a stick up my ass).

Most people don't have the time or live in an area with a bunch of forests for them to run around in.
My country is packed with forests. I suppose I didn't take into account that not every country is like that. (Don't even get me started on the "don't have the time"-part, if you're having children, then make sure you(general you) DO have the time.)

I know my mom let me watch TV and stuff like that because she knew that I was gonna find out anyway, so she would rather me find out stuff and ask her about it rather than find out something completely wrong, like guys pee inside you when they have sex (people actually believe that).
No TV =/= No sex education. And letting your children learn these things from TV is a bad idea, anyway (I think there's a trope concerning this...).

Television, video games, and the internet do not automatically turn your kid into lazy couch potatos, you know.
Yes, but all those things ARE unnecessary distractions.

You think kids watch cartoons because they have nothing better to do?
I watched cartoons because I had nothing better to do. I always found them to be so extremely boring. I remember I'd often go to the fields and crouch next to my grandmother and watch her weeding onions (or something else), even that was better than watching TV (but it'd get boring eventually). I had a very boring childhood, I WISH my parents spent more time keeping me occupied and didn't completely leave me to do whatever I wanted. I WISH they took me places, I WISH they made me play the piano, or some other instrument.

edited 11th Jan '11 9:14:23 AM by fanty

Individual liberation is an illusion.
Failed Comic Artist
^ And I wish my parents would have just left me the hell alone to watch TV instead of trying to make me play outside which I found insanely boring and hated. So apparently both our upbringings didnt work right.
I dont know why they let me out, I guess they needed a spare bed
 55 Bur, Tue, 11th Jan '11 9:21:12 AM from Flyover Country Relationship Status: You cannot grasp the true form
Or perhaps you could find a happy medium between outdoor and indoor play? My parents pushed me outside to go dig up fossils in the lots that hadn't been built on yet, gave me buckets to catch tadpoles with (and were exasperated with the ungodly amount of tadpoles I tried to keep as pets) and then when I was covered in dirt and tired enough to not be a pain in the ass I was allowed indoors and it was tv and videogame time. [lol]

...course this may have been survival strategy on their part because I was incredibly hyperactive...

edited 11th Jan '11 9:25:06 AM by Bur

 56 Stolen By Faeries, Tue, 11th Jan '11 9:52:08 AM from a sea of discontent.
Entrap me, Entrall me.
All of my friends, my sister's friends, and my nana think my mum was pretty strict. And even she thinks this woman is nuts.

F.Y.I. I was allowed to watch educational programs like Mathica's Math Shop (I miss her) and nature documentaries as well as my cartoons (I like my cartoons: I make time for my cartoons). There is nothing wrong with Disney and putting a little painting easel in front of Andrew Lloyd Webber hits isn't going to harm them.

Just because your parents let you watch TV it doesn't mean they're dumping you in front of the robo-babysitter. Parents have to make an effort at balancing fun and education: fields trips and home activities. TV in itself is not inherently bad.

My mum doesn't like video games: I don't blame her! My father was obsessed with them. Once again, moderation. Sometimes it's nice to leave reality like that. Yes I know there's books: as a matter of fact, they're my prefered method - fantasy/mystery ones in particular. But sometimes you just don't feel like it (or in my case READ all the books four times already), just like sometimes you want to use the internet for something. Even Einstein promoted time to relax.

Also, unfortunately no TV doesn't equal no sex education. I knew a couple of girls who never watched TV and whose mum was downright psycho (not just for TV reasons, but plenty of other crazy things) about them and it was astounding what they knew at the age of ten. I didn't know that much and it took me months of Brain Bleach to get over what they told me.

edited 11th Jan '11 10:00:51 AM by StolenByFaeries

“Ocean: A body of water occupying about two-thirds of a world made for man - who has no gills.”
 57 wuggles, Tue, 11th Jan '11 10:29:46 AM from Miami, FL Relationship Status: [TOP SECRET]
if you're having children, then make sure you(general you) DO have the time.

Yeah, well, I'm sorry that my mom couldn't keep my dad from leaving and making her provide for a child herself. My mom, I'm sure, would love to have the time to walk through the forest with me. But we're a 1 income household, so she HAS to work multiple jobs to support us. I think you're projecting your personal problems with your parents on everybody.

edited 11th Jan '11 10:30:41 AM by wuggles

Yeah, I never really bought the claim that things like reading, theatre and classical music are inherently superior to television, videogames or rock n' roll. Thankfully, my parents never tried to force me to like the same things they did.

I prefered indoors as I lacked co-ordination and wasn't very tall. I don't exactly regret it but I can see why you would want to encouragea child toward going outside. The very best way of doing that however is to simply ensure that s/he is nice to other children, then they will distract each other from being indoors.

 60 Deboss, Tue, 11th Jan '11 11:08:04 AM from Awesomeville Texas
I see the Awesomeness.
I'd say theatre and classical music are inferior across the board though.
 61 Major Tom, Tue, 11th Jan '11 11:15:50 AM Relationship Status: Barbecuing
Eye'm the cutest!
I had loads of outdoors availability going on as a kid. Prior to high school my brother and I would often be outside more waking hours per day than in. Of course this being Colorado, we didn't have this availability all year round. Really the best times of year to be outdoors are from March til November and in the months of March through second week of May and from third week of September til November was heavily dependent on the weather being warm enough. (In the summer all you had to worry about was dodging summer monsoon storms)

Still didn't keep us from doing stuff inside if the weather got a little too hot or a little too cold or we couldn't think of anything to do outside.

Also, this Chinese lady obviously never heard of the concept of overstimulation. Kids these days are booked for everything, their lives ridiculously nay religiously scheduled around activities with no such thing as unallocated down time. Wake up, eat breakfast, go to practice of some sorts for some, go to school (and never have things like P.E. or recess), get out, go to practice of some kind (soccer disturbingly frequent enough for those under the age of 12), get home, do some other scheduled activity like piano lessons or bullshit like homework, eat supper, go to bed and not necessarily all in that order. With a livelihood like that, there's no time for a kid to be a kid. One of the best things you can do for a kid is let them have hours at a time bitching and moaning "I'm bored" and stuff like that. It forces the kid to entertain himself, to find something to do of their own volition. That ability transfers well into more adult livelihoods like serving in the military or working a career.

edited 11th Jan '11 11:20:06 AM by MajorTom

Endless Conflict: Every war ends in time, even supposedly this one.
I was allowed television but not video games until I was in middle school or so; I used to go over to other kids' houses and play their consoles. I also, however, had big long fantasy adventures in the backyard/neighborhood/friends' houses, and filmed homemade movies, and sold lemonade, and drew pictures. As long as your kids have a healthy imagination (which you have to foster in them young), the TV doesn't hurt anything; a lot of my outside games and movies involved concepts I'd gotten from cartoon shows. Watching Pokemon made me want to go play Let's Pretend: Pokemon Edition, not sit on the couch all day eating chocolate.
BTW, I'm a chick.
 63 Balloon Fleet, Tue, 11th Jan '11 3:04:24 PM from Chicago, IL, USA
MASTER-DEBATER
Holy crap: I thought my mum was strict!

You had a lesser evil than her. It was still evil though.

Yeah, well, I'm sorry that my mom couldn't keep my dad from leaving and making her provide for a child herself. My mom, I'm sure, would love to have the time to walk through the forest with me. But we're a 1 income household, so she HAS to work multiple jobs to support us.

lol that was good.

...personally, I hope they grow up hating her. Nothing sobers up shitty parents than being abandoned by their children.
^ True, it doesnt ALWAYS work. Still, wait until she gets old, then dump her in a shitty abusive nursing home.

Sociopathic Comedy or Black Gallows Humor? lol

Also the bitch went on Good Morning America today to discuss her book today. They pointed out how her inflammatory articles and whatnot just pissed off a LOT of people.
WHASSUP.......

....with lolis!
Meh. I don't like the stereotyping.

Here's what I know. I have a learning disability that wasn't discovered until high school. My Western parents and I used to get into fights every single night during middle school. I'd be lying if I said that I'd never contemplated killing myself during that time period. The kind of "tough love" this woman advocates would have most likely led to me either becoming a runaway or following through on those thoughts. Instead, I'm now in the college honors program and making the Dean's List.

If that's because of having a Western family, and if Japan's high suicide rate is because of Asian parenting (You can't take credit for successes without taking credit for failures, after all), then I thank my lucky stars that I was born into a Western one.

Myself, I prefer to think that individual couples each have their own styles and that I was just lucky to have the parents I had.

EDIT: @Yamikuronue: I did the exact same thing with my sister! <3 Only, we did lock ourselves in her room instead of going outside so that our parents wouldn't interrupt us. ^^ And so we didn't get dirt on our clothes.

edited 11th Jan '11 7:40:01 PM by Clevomon

 
Also known as Katz
This woman should have just bought The Sims, since she doesn't seem to grasp the concept that other people's lives don't exist solely for you to arrange to make yourself happy. My favorite quote is:

What Chinese parents understand is that nothing is fun until you're good at it.

Lol! It isn't if your parents constantly deride you.

Also, this Chinese lady obviously never heard of the concept of overstimulation. Kids these days are booked for everything, their lives ridiculously nay religiously scheduled around activities with no such thing as unallocated down time.

Certainly, and aside from making your kids miserable, you're depriving them of important developmental experiences. Creativity and the ability to entertain yourself, certainly, and other skills too: My mother (a chemistry teacher) sometimes encounters students who lack basic pouring skills because they never had time to play in the bath.

@jewelleddragon

You sure that isn't simple clumsiness?
 
Also known as Katz
[up]Some, but not all.

 68 drunkscriblerian, Tue, 11th Jan '11 9:44:09 PM from Castle Geekhaven Relationship Status: In season
Street Writing Man
@fanty: just so you don't feel alone in the world, I agree with you. I spent the first 7 years of my life without TV (by necessity actually, because there wasn't TV where I was at the time) and I loved it. I've never voluntarily paid for cable and I don't intend to start anytime soon.

@Resenters: News flash...it's a parent's right to prohibit their kids from certain influences, at least as it pertains to their own house. Sure, the kids in question might not always like it. But the alternative is all those silly rules regarding content in television, movies, music...need I go on? Parents can either control their own household or they can feel powerless and try to control everyone's house through petition writing and action-group forming (fuck you, Tipper Gore).

If I were to write some of the strange things that come under my eyes they would not be believed.

~Cora M. Strayer~
 69 Balloon Fleet, Tue, 11th Jan '11 10:03:40 PM from Chicago, IL, USA
MASTER-DEBATER
What Chinese parents understand is that nothing is fun until you're good at it.

And I could turn it on its corner and say 'nothing is fun if it's easy to do and you want to do stuff that is hard' which is just as valid as what she said.......

seriously, that's BS. I'm not very adept @ chemistry as an examplebut I still like discussing and learning it....

and for a 'fun' example, II wasnt good @ DDR when i first played but liked it a lot.

Some, but not all.

I'm also thinking it's stuff like 'they spent a lot of time using showers or something'

edited 11th Jan '11 10:05:07 PM by BalloonFleet

WHASSUP.......

....with lolis!
Hurray for the WSJ perpetuating stereotype! Hurray for a self-promoting stereotype promoting these stereotypes! The vast majority of Chinese parents ARE notably stricter than the vast majority of American parents, but NOTHING like what is described here. I doubt she is, either. What's more, they would never run around arrogantly claiming "My method of mothering is superior!"

The entire feeling of the first article is inauthentic and it appears to function solely based on exaggerated and antiquated stereotype. It's like if they did a profile of a Japanese father they included something along the lines of "If our firstborn shames our family, I expect him to take his own life to reclaim the family honor" or something absurd like that.

Edit: Okay — I should have read through the remainder of this thread and the article before I posted.

"If a Chinese child gets a B—which would never happen—there would first be a screaming, hair-tearing explosion. The devastated Chinese mother would then get dozens, maybe hundreds of practice tests and work through them with her child for as long as it takes to get the grade up to an A."

Yep, she's trolling, or at least abusing hyperbole to an extreme. Sadly, there are some people in this country who will probably believe this to be representative of Chinese parenting and assume the worst.

edited 11th Jan '11 10:58:48 PM by UnabashedFornicator

 71 fanty, Tue, 11th Jan '11 10:38:29 PM from ANGRYTOWN
Woefully Ineloquent
One of the best things you can do for a kid is let them have hours at a time bitching and moaning "I'm bored" and stuff like that. It forces the kid to entertain himself, to find something to do of their own volition. That ability transfers well into more adult livelihoods like serving in the military or working a career.
Oh, believe me, it's definitely NOT one of the best things to give to a child. The times when I would run out of anything to do (which would mostly occur in winter or during rainy days) were outright painful. For a child, there's nothing worse you could possibly give than boredom, and contrary to what most people think, children do have too much free time to properly fill it out by themselves. I started feeling like there's too much for me to do only when I reached mid-teens and school schedules became insane.

Enough time to play = good. Enough time to make you sit around and moan that you're bored = bad.

But we're a 1 income household, so she HAS to work multiple jobs to support us. I think you're projecting your personal problems with your parents on everybody.
Oops, another thing found in my country is that the amounts of money lone mothers get from the government are so huge that children of lone mothers have it better than children growing up in full families. (The girl in our class who was always the best dressed and was the first one to have a cellphone was a daughter of a lone mother.)

Individual liberation is an illusion.
 72 drunkscriblerian, Tue, 11th Jan '11 10:46:27 PM from Castle Geekhaven Relationship Status: In season
Street Writing Man
Oh, believe me, it's definitely NOT one of the best things to give to a child. The times when I would run out of anything to do (which would mostly occur in winter or during rainy days) were outright painful. For a child, there's nothing worse you could possibly give than boredom, and contrary to what most people think, children do have too much free time to properly fill it out by themselves. I started feeling like there's too much for me to do only when I reached mid-teens and school schedules became insane.

Enough time to play = good. Enough time to make you sit around and moan that you're bored = bad.

partial agreement, however being without easy entertainment forced me to find ways to entertain myself. A personal example; I guess one could invoke Your Mileage May Vary on this concept.
If I were to write some of the strange things that come under my eyes they would not be believed.

~Cora M. Strayer~
Chaotic New Troll
If we ever allowed real life examples on Character Alignment pages, then the woman in this article is unquestionably Lawful Evil.
I was an indoorsey child, and I swiftly realised that books aren't that much fun if they aren't to your sense of humour. Why should you force kids to do stuff they don't want to? If you have a sporty child then denying TV and Gaming will make them go outside, whereas denying it to a child that is indooresy and none bookish simply leads to them getting frustrated.

OFC this is purely academic as I doubt m/any of the people in this discussion have kids.

Also known as Katz
Oh, believe me, it's definitely NOT one of the best things to give to a child. The times when I would run out of anything to do (which would mostly occur in winter or during rainy days) were outright painful. For a child, there's nothing worse you could possibly give than boredom, and contrary to what most people think, children do have too much free time to properly fill it out by themselves. I started feeling like there's too much for me to do only when I reached mid-teens and school schedules became insane. Enough time to play = good. Enough time to make you sit around and moan that you're bored = bad.

Yes and no. Certainly, I don't think you should intentionally bore your child, but the statement "children have too much free time" is highly subjective; all you can really say is that you had too much free time (so did I) or that it's possible to have too much free time. There are definitely kids who don't have a second to spare in their lives.

The difference, as I see it, between being too busy and being not busy enough is that there aren't really any harmful consequences of being bored; they're no fun, but unlike the stress of an overloaded schedule, they don't hurt you any. If anything, being forced to self-entertain fosters creative skills and, of course, prepares you for a real world where not everything is entertaining.

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