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A "cure" for Autism
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A "cure" for Autism:

"Overdiagnosing mental disorders is just as harmful as underdiagnosing them."

Only if you think a diagnosis of a mental disorder means 'oh no! I'm broken and need to be fixed!'

Personally, I think it just means you have different needs from the majority of people, and therefore need somewhat different treatment.
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 177 Jeysie, Fri, 29th Apr '11 9:00:23 AM from Western Massachusetts
Diva of Virtual Death
Only if you think a diagnosis of a mental disorder means 'oh no! I'm broken and need to be fixed!'
No, it means, well, that it's interfering with your life enough that it requires treatment as opposed to just being quirky.

Plus the issue is more that giving either the wrong kind of treatment or treatment that isn't needed can be harmful. So overdiagnosis isn't really a problem with stigmatizing, but a problem with prescribing treatment that isn't actually necessary and diagnosing a problem that doesn't actually exist.
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 178 del diablo, Fri, 29th Apr '11 10:08:13 AM from Somewher in mid Norway
Den harde nordmann
Another problem is that if you get on medications far too early, you never learn how to fight your disease. I doubt Stephen Hawking would be alive today if he got meds from day 1, because he would never have learned where to aquire the willpower and resistance to keep on going.
The same applies to ADD, if they actually diagnose you with it, you should NOT get your hands on medicines until you learn that all the medicines do is to supress something, and that you can by will supress most of it.
Nevermind that a lot of them actually need the medicine too.
That said, I don't want my autism cured if it means that I lose my extra intelligence and ability to focus. All it does to me is to make me a bit socially awkward, but not that a ludicrous degree. If curing my autism means that all that happens is that the small piece of the puzzle regarding social logic is removed, I would take it.

That said, i have had bad eyesight my entire childhood, but it was not discovered until I was 13-14 years old. And then I got glasses, it was really nice to get proper perception on the one sense that the body is overfocused over, but on the other hand it is sort of weird to notice that I had better reaction, smell, hearing and ability to feel touch before I got glasses. After I got em, it gradually started going a bit down to "average" level.
I also have Strabismus(my eyes are not aligned, but it is not visible, so basically my left and my right eye look at different angles), which means that I have underdeveloped ability to perceive 3D. And by that I mean such as if someone throws me a ball, I am a lot more likely to totaly miscalculate its location and its path.
I would want my strabismus cured, but not sure about my poor eyesight. On one hand I am required by socity to be able to read sings at a long distance, on the other hand having the other sense quite a bit sharper is really nice.
A guy called dvorak is tired. Tired of humanity not wanting to change to improve itself. Quite the sad tale.
 179 Barkey, Fri, 29th Apr '11 10:31:47 AM from Bunker 051
War Profiteer
^

Wish I could get mine cured, but it's a neurological pathway issue in addition to a strabismus. Sucks ass man.

On the other hand, I've gotten this far. The only problems I encounter are that it's harder for me to get into any sort of security or law enforcement institutions because of the bullshit medical requirements. My one good eye can read every letter on the chart, and I've gotten marksman on almost every qualification I've ever shot.

Buut my achilles heel is watching 3D movies with the glasses.
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 180 del diablo, Fri, 29th Apr '11 10:52:33 AM from Somewher in mid Norway
Den harde nordmann
^: Lack of ability to interprent the image into 3D, or just severe headache due underexposure?
A guy called dvorak is tired. Tired of humanity not wanting to change to improve itself. Quite the sad tale.
 181 Barkey, Fri, 29th Apr '11 10:55:28 AM from Bunker 051
War Profiteer
Headache plus the fact that it doesn't work for me. I see in triplicate when with 3d glasses on.
The AR-15 is responsible for 95% of all deaths each year. The rest of the deaths are from obesity and drone strikes.
 182 Jeysie, Fri, 29th Apr '11 11:21:53 AM from Western Massachusetts
Diva of Virtual Death
[up][up][up][up] Heh, I have astigmatism in both eyes plus something wrong with my optic nerve in my left eye that renders it really near-sighted. I can see OK enough without glasses (which is good, since I can't afford 'em), but have to squint to read anything more than a few feet away clearly.

Was kind of surprised to find that 3D works for me when the local theater had only 3D for Tron: Legacy (grumble), but it gave me a nagging headache.
Apparently I am adorable, but my GF is my #1 Groupie. (Avatar by Dreki-K)
somethingsomething
Not really thread-hopping, but not quite sure how come this thread led to the topic of 3d glasses...

[1]
We kill the thing that made them who they were

[2]
Some people like being different. And the violation of personal liberty is a big point against any action (save for harmful ones).

Yeah, I'm not quite sure how "curing" autism would work, but I find the thought of making somebody not be themselves rather... scary.

 184 Fearmonger, Sun, 8th May '11 5:28:53 AM from Perth, Australia
I would be livid at anyone who called it a "cure". As for whether I'd use it...I don't know enough about the difference between how my brain works and how a "normal" brain works. I'd consider it, but probably wouldn't go through with it.
 
"I doubt Stephen Hawking would be alive today if he got meds from day 1, because he would never have learned where to aquire the willpower and resistance to keep on going."

Actually, I heard that doctors figure he was misdiagnosed. Instead of ALS, he appears to have a previously unknown syndrome that is similar but less progressive. There's no way an ALS person could live as long as he has, willpower or no willpower.

I'm really skeptical of all the quasi-magical powers people attribute to willpower. To hear people talk, you can will cancer away. I find that sort of thing really disrespectful to the people who don't get the good outcomes, because it makes it sound like it's their fault for not wanting it enough.
If I'm asking for advice on a story idea, don't tell me it can't be done.
Ettina: It depends. The thing is, apparently he kept on ignoring that parts of his body kept on failing on him.
That meant that when his body finally started collapsing, he was more used it it, meaning it was easier to adapt.
Then again: The issue here is that he could adapt, for something like... severe cancer it does not matter, because you die anyhow.
I guess I am stating a opinion that easly falls into the Slippery Slope.
 
 187 Yej, Sun, 8th May '11 7:41:54 AM from <0,1i>
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I doubt Stephen Hawking would be alive today if he got meds from day 1, because he would never have learned where to aquire the willpower and resistance to keep on going.
Other than the fact that there aren't any meds that do anything more than extend your life about 6 months, you're assuming that resistance and willpower are good things unto themselves, even when there isn't any difficulty to face. I don't agree. If you told me a Utopia is a bad thing because nobody would have any willpower or tenacity, I'd probably reply, "So?"
Da Rules excuse all the inaccuracy in the world. Listen to them, not me.
 188 jasonwill 2, Sun, 22nd May '11 10:48:33 AM from West Virginia
Personally, I think it just means you have different needs from the majority of people[/quoteblock]]

[[quoteblock]]No, it means, well, that it's interfering with your life enough that it requires treatment as opposed to just being quirky.

The first statement is right, and I will tell you why. We have different primary needs in different amounts, and since "normal" people have different primary needs in different amounts, we are deprived of our needs, and suffer because of that.

So really then, it is only a disease when people's needs ain't being met. Still, if we learn how to meet our needs, we will still have it.

Trying to make an autistic person normal is like putting diesel in a jet fighter, instead of jet fuel...
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 189 Jeysie, Sun, 22nd May '11 11:39:05 AM from Western Massachusetts
Diva of Virtual Death
So really then, it is only a disease when people's needs ain't being met.
So, like I said:

No, it means, well, that it's interfering with your life enough that it requires treatment as opposed to just being quirky.
Hell, that's even the official, standard definition of mental disorder. ("and the disturbance must cause clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning.") A given traits is only considered a disorder for diagnosis purposes if it's causing you or people around you enough grief/issues that you can't function without it being treated.

Even if you're utterly weird, if you're getting along fine in life anyway no worse than the rest of us, then you don't have a disorder. (Or, rather, to be technical, even if you do have what would otherwise match a disorder, it's irrelevant, as you don't require treatment.)

edited 22nd May '11 11:42:41 AM by Jeysie

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