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Young Justice: Tropes A to E
  • Absentee Actor: Each member of the Team has been absent for at least one episode. Superboy has the most appearances out of all of them, although his reveal at the end of episode one is nonspeaking. It's also not uncommon for a character to appear in an episode, but not say anything in order to avoid spending money on voice actors. Eleventh Hour Ranger Rocket and The Leaguers are chronic offenders, but Nightwing, Kid Flash, and Miss Martian have also been subject to it.
  • Action Girl: Artemis is easily the forefront example, but by God she is not the only one;
    • She's followed by Batgirl, Wonder Girl, Bumblebee, Zatanna, Miss Martian, and Rocket in the Team.
    • Wonder Woman and Black Canary also make appearances in this show, which naturally adds them to the list.
    • Asami "Sam" Koizumi is a minor character based on Samurai from Superfriends.
  • Adaptational Badass: Villains Mister Twister, Sportsmaster, and Count Vertigo have been given revamps that have turned them into real badasses as opposed to their non-badass (and in Sportsmaster's case, outright joke) comic book counterparts.
    • Likewise, The Reach in the comic books focused on diplomacy and subversion to subjugate a species over a period of 100 years, with only one agent on their behalf. In this series, on the other hand, they have a huge army stationed on the ocean bed ready to invade.
    • Likewise, Otis turns from Lex Luthor's bumbling sidekick to head of his heavily armed security detail.
  • Adaptation Distillation: Creator Greg Weisman has stated that the purpose of the series is to distill the best portions of the DCU as a whole.
  • Adaptation Dye-Job: The Guardian sports red hair in the series, despite traditionally being a blonde in the comics, to help denote he is Roy Harper's uncle (actually, his clone).
  • Adaptation Name Change:
    • The G-Gnomes are called DNAliens in the comics (What can you say, they were from the Jimmy Olsen Superman's Pal series).
      • To be fair, Ben 10: Alien Force already used the term DNAliens on Cartoon Network, so the creators probably wanted to avoid any confusion.
    • The Light was originally the Secret Society of Super Villains.
    • The two other members of the Marvel family are named Lieutenant and Sergeant Marvel, as opposed to Captain Marvel, Jr. and Mary Marvel.
    • The Reach's Ambassador was known as the Negotiator in the comics.
    • Vykin, leader of the Forever People, had the qualifier "the Black" dropped from his name, presumably due to political correctness.
  • Adult Fear: "Misplaced" explores the terrors of parents being separated from their children to children being endangered by the sudden disappearance of their parents. In the final act, Zatara is faced with a parent's ultimate fear - losing one's child to events beyond your control. Zatanna is similarly left to deal with losing her father by the episode's end, but in this case because of her own hasty decision.
    • During the events of Season 2, a key plotline has multiple children abducted and then experimented on by the Reach. Virgil Hawkins even mentions that not only was he tortured, some of the kids were killed when their experiments weren't satisfactory.
  • Adults Are Useless: Largely averted, but there are a few cases where this is played straight.
    • In "Humanity", the League (which includes Batman) is completely unsuccessful in tracking down Red Tornado despite weeks of effort. The Team proceeds to find him and foil the villain's plan inside of a day.
      • Re-averted when the team needs the help of Red Tornado to actually save the day. They found him, but they were horribly outmatched.
    • In "Failsafe", the entire League is defeated by the aliens without achieving any sort of victory, whereas the Team is then successful in running numerous offensive actions. The entire point of the training simulation was to see how the Team could cope after losing the League as support.
  • Aerith and Bob: Atlantean names: Kaldur'ahm, La'gaan, Orin, Tula... and Garth.
  • An Aesop: The show's episodes often have Aesops about Leadership, Teamwork or Strategy including such gems as:
    • "Dropzone": The best strategist isn't always the best leader. Also, always have a clear chain of command.
    • "Schooled": No matter how strong you think you are, there's always someone stronger, which is why you need to learn how to kick their ass too.
    • "Bereft": Bad things happen when you don't secure your communications.
    • "Failsafe": Know who's expendable and who isn't.
    • "Secrets" is largely meant to convey the message that secrets, especially bad ones, have a way of coming to light eventually. Artemis, however, refuses to learn that lesson.
    • "Usual Suspects": You need to trust your friends to accept you for who you really are.
    • "Salvage" deals with addiction and the way it destroys your life and relationships, although instead of literal drug addiction they use the metaphor of being obsessed with finding the original Speedy.
      • Although a mention should go to Superboy with those superpatches.
    • "Depths": Failure is a greater judge of character than success. Given by a villain to his son for excellent work in terrorism and murder.
    • "Satisfaction": Intelligence and resourcefulness are more important than weapons or physical resources.
  • And the Adventure Continues: The finale mixes this with a cliffhanger ending.
  • Airplane Arms: Cheshire. Of the Ninja Run variety.
  • Affably Evil: Lex Luthor is unfailingly polite at all times, as are most members of the Light.
  • Air Jousting: While using a shield patch, Superboy does this several times against Match in "Agendas".
  • Air-Vent Passageway:
    • Subverted in the pilot. The Team did climb into the vents, but quickly dropped out of them back into a different hallway, hacking the surveillance computers to make the villains think they were using them to escape the building.
    • Played straight in "Homefront".
  • The Alcatraz: Belle Reve, a supervillain penitentiary run by Amanda Waller, strong enough to contain Superman himself. They checked. At the end of "Terrors" it falls under the control of the Light, who foment an escape plot in order to remove Waller as warden and replace her with Dr. Hugo Strange, one of their agents.
  • Alien Invasion:
  • Aliens Speaking English: Played with in various ways.
    • When M'gann had her memory of arriving on Earth erased by Psimon in "Bereft" she initially thinks in the Martian language, and only switches to English when she realizes she's on Earth.
    • In "Happy New Year", Lobo shows up speaking solely in Interlac, which not even the audience can understand. However, he soon activates a belt device that translates most of his speech into English.
    • Adam Strange took weeks to even discover a means of communication when he was accidentally transported to the planet Rann. Miss Martian helps bridge the language gap during her visit with a psychic link. The team discovers she has been rendered unconscious when they can no longer understand each other.
    • The Krolotean language is unintelligible to everyone but Blue Beetle, whose armor has a Universal Translator. Other characters, and the audience, cannot understand the language even when Beetle is the one speaking it.
    • The Reach speak English to Kaldur and the Earthling public, but speak their own language around Jaime due to their secret agenda concerning the Scarab.
  • Aliens Steal Cable:
    • When she deduces that she is on Earth after having her memory erased, M'gann is extremely happy to finally be here, but is slightly disappointed that it is nothing like TV. We later learn that M'gann's human appearance and mannerisms are based off of a short-lived sitcom called Hello Megan!
    • Serifan, one of the Forever People who lives on distant New Genesis, is said to be a big fan of Westerns. Thus, he wields a pair of revolvers that fire Depleted Phlebotinum Shells.
    • It's said that the Martians receive TV through the Martian Manhunter and Robin (Tim Drake) says that all Martians love TV. Green Beetle claims to learn of the Reach's presence on Earth this way, and goes down from Mars to help the Justice League. In reality he has been working with the Reach
  • All Just a Dream: "Failsafe". However, the events still have lasting traumatic effects on the Team.
  • All of the Other Reindeer: The other villains in Belle Reve prison constantly bully The Riddler, and will not let him eat lunch with them. He gets the last laugh when he is the only one to actually escape in the breakout attempt.
  • All There in the Manual: The tie-in comic gives us background information on characters, explaining how certain team members came to become the proteges' of their respective mentors, and additional information on missions.
  • All Your Base Are Belong to Us:
    • "Homefront", where Red Torpedo and Red Inferno take over the Team's secret mountain hideout.
    • "Auld Acquaintance", where Vandal Savage takes over the Watchtower and brainwashes the entire Justice League.
    • "Darkest", where Black Manta II and his group hack security measures and invade Mount Justice.
  • All Your Powers Combined:
    • The android A.M.A.Z.O. can copy the powers of all people he encounters and use them at will, though he can only access one power set at a time.
    • In "Disordered," the five Forever People merge into the massive and powerful Infinity Man.
    • In "Performance", Parasite used multiple abilities stolen from circus performers to commit his crimes. By the end, he's stolen both Superboy and Miss Martian's powers, and uses them in tandem to fight the Team.
  • Alliterative Name: A given as a DC Comics adaptation, though it is Lampshaded in "Targets" when Megan Morse and Conner Kent introduce themselves. When Wendy and Marvin hear Conner and Megan's names, Marvin makes a joke about "double alliteration, I like it". Wendy is voiced by Masasa Moyo, and Marvin is portrayed by Nolan North.
  • Almost Kiss:
  • Aloof Ally: Red Arrow though this turned out to be part of his "programming." Joining the team would look less impressive to the league than striking out on his own.
  • Alternate Continuity: The series takes place early during the Second Age of Heroes on Earth-16 of the DC Multiverse.
  • Always Save the Girl: When attacked on his cross-country run to bring a new heart to a young girl in need of a transplant, Kid Flash decides to stop fighting Vandal Savage in order to finish delivering the heart. Unfortunately, the fifteen minutes it took him to realize that his fight was delaying his delivery was too long, as the young girl died twelve minutes before his arrival. At least, that was the story told to Kid Flash by the henchman who wanted to steal the heart to keep it from getting to the girl at all.
  • Amnesiac Dissonance: With their memories of the past six months erased, Superboy is a mindless berserker (he has not been alive that long), Kid Flash and Artemis begin to mildly flirt (as opposed to their normal interactions), and Artemis believes that she is probably here because her father ordered her to kill Kid Flash.
  • And I Must Scream:
    • T.O. Morrow turns off Red Tornado's motor functions, powers and voice, leaving him a motionless shell that nonetheless can see, hear and think about everything Morrow is doing.
    • Blue Beetle, trapped for months under the control of the Reach.
  • And Your Little Dog Too: Almost word-for-word.
    Desaad: "Kill the boy, and his little dog, too."
  • Angst? What Angst?: Becomes a plotpoint in-universe in "Failsafe" at least until Artemis's "death". In "Disordered", Conner feels intense guilt because he didn't angst one bit during "Failsafe".
  • Apocalypse How: Red Volcano attempts a Class 1.
  • Apologetic Attacker: Aqualad apologises to mind-controlled Aquaman after having to knock him unconscious. M'Gann does the same with brainwashed J'onn.
  • Arc Number: 16.
  • Are We Getting This?: When Cheshire attempts to assassinate Lex Luthor with an RPG, but is foiled by Red Arrow, reporter Cat Grant desperately asks her cameraman if he got the shot.
  • Are We There Yet?: Klarion in "Denial".
  • Arm Cannon: Mercy Graves comes with one in this continuity, which impresses both North and South Rhelasia enough to get them talking peace if they can get access to the technology.
    • Arsenal gets an even more powerful one to replace the arm that was removed to clone him.
  • Armor-Piercing Question: During Wally's What the Hell, Hero? speech in "Darkest" to Nightwing, Nightwing keeps telling him that this is under control and the ends justify the means. When Wally says this, Nightwing has no retort
    Wally: Kaldur lost the love of his life and found out Black Manta was his father within a few months. He's supposed to be playing them. Are you absolutely sure he isn't playing you?
  • Arrogant Kung-Fu Guy: Superboy explicitly states that, with his powers, he is always in control of a fight and always has the advantage. Black Canary teaches him the error of his ways.
  • Arrow Catch: The Flash, under mind-control, does this with Artemis' arrows. She compensates by aiming an explosive arrow at the floor.
    • Black Beetle with one of Arsenal's arrows in "True Colors".
    • Arsenal faces this again with Mongul in "War".
  • Arson, Murder, and Lifesaving: After a recon mission goes wildly out of control, Batman berates the Team for going against his orders... and then congratulates them for saving the day anyway and praising them for reacting well when the initial plan did not work.
  • Arson, Murder, and Jaywalking: In season 2's "Satisfaction", Speedy comments that in the eight years he'd been captured by the Light that the sidekicks had formed a team, aliens had invaded the Earth, and Oliver grew a "dopey goatee".
  • Artificial Gill: One of the many things Robin (and likely Batman by extension) has in his Utility Belt. After nearly drowning two missions in a row, Artemis also begins carrying them.
  • Artificial Human/Ridiculously Human Robot: Red Inferno and Red Torpedo used to look (and think they were) human as part of T.O. Morrow's plan to have them destroy the community of superheroes from within. Red Tornado was constructed to always look like, and know he was, a robot, but he built an android body of his own so he could interact with humans as John Smith.
  • Artistic License - Geology: Yellowstone is indeed a super-volcano capable of depopulating North America and generally threatening humanity. However, the series presents it as a single, slightly-larger-than-average volcano. The Yellowstone caldera, in reality, encompasses all of Yellowstone and is the size of the state of Connecticut.
  • Art Shift: During Topo's story in "Downtime."
  • Ascended Meme: Tie-in comics suggest The Flaming C is a TV show in Earth-16, with one kid dressed as The Flaming C during "Secrets."
  • Assimilation Backfire: The series had an appearance of Parasite, who was defeated when he stole Miss Martian's powers without realizing they came with a weakness to fire, which the heroes exploit.
  • As You Know:
    • In episode 14, "Revelation," after the initial giant plant attack the members of the Team together sum up the interconnected events of the earlier episodes.
    • Episode 15, "Humanity", has Dr T.O. Morrow gives the whole backstory of Red Tornado, and the reasons for his creation to Tornado's unmoving, and silenced body.
    • Episode 23, "Insecurity" has Huntress deliver her own history as a villain to Artemis, who should both know it. Some of this was foreshadowed early, but it's still fairly awkward dialogue between the two.
    • In "Happy New Year," the first episode after the Time Skip, Lagoon Boy is sparring with Nightwing and, upon his defeat, explains (to Nightwing) Nightwing's history as Robin in order to make sure that viewers understand he changed costumed identities during the skip.
    • In "Alienated," M'gann speaks this exact phrase before explaining the mystery of of the "missing 16 hours" six members of the League lost while under Vandal Savage's mind control just before the Time Skip.
    • Episodes near the end of season 2 tend to start with characters summing up what's happened up to that point.
  • Attack! Attack... Retreat! Retreat!: A massive group of aliens is attacking our heroes! Wait, what's that? Blue Beetle's with them? Retreat! Evacuate the base! Alien women and children first! Activate the Self-Destruct Mechanism!
  • Attack Drone: The Air Force of Bialya fields a large force of unmanned drones, allowing Miss Martian multiple opportunities for some nice casualty-free explosions.
  • Attack Pattern Alpha: "Maneuver Seven" is used repeatedly, which involves one of the Team helping launch another member at the enemy.
  • Attractive Bent-Gender: Kid Flash can not help but admire Miss Martian's Rule 63 impersonation of him.
  • Badass Adorable: Captain Marvel. From the start he basically acts like the ten year old he is, only the team doesn't know. Which makes his disappointment over not getting to go to the Halloween party in "Secrets" kind of adorable even when he has a tantrum and goes trick or treating instead.
  • Badass Boast: Episode "Terrors" offers us two interesting subversions:
    Amanda Waller: Belle Reve's walls are thick enough to hold Superman. We know - we've checked. No one's ever escaped Belle Reve. No one ever will.
    The Riddler: No one can say the Riddler goes where he's not wanted.
  • Badass Bystander: When Bumblebee and Blue Beetle track down a Krolotean that was impersonating Bill "Bibbo" Bibbowski, it was Bibbo himself who knocked out the imposter.
  • Badass Family:
    • The Crock family as in, Sportsmaster and his two daughters Cheshire and Artemis. Slightly subverted as they all hate each other. Also, it's implied that their mother was pretty badass before she was crippled.
    • The West-Allen (+ Garrick) family. Barry Allen, nephew-by-marriage Wally West, and grandson Bart Allen end up defeating the Reach's Endgame.
  • Badass Abnormal: Arsenal. He started out as a Badass Normal, but the arm cannon Lex Luthor gives him pushes him into the same weight class as Flying Bricks Superboy and Wonder Girl.
  • Badass Normal: Naturally, considering Nightwing, Batgirl and the third Robin are all in the show, but it's lampshaded by Robinnote  in the season 2 episode "Intervention"
    Blue Beetle: But Garrett still inspired Kord to become the second Blue Beetle, even with no superpowers.
    Robin: I hear those are optional.
  • Bad Future: "Bloodlines". The world is devastated forty years into the future, with Mount Justice a blasted crater. Impulse traveled back in time to avert it, but at the end of the episode the wasteland remains.
  • The Bad Guy Wins: The Light "wins" most skirmishes with the team, getting what they want even when it looks like they have lost. In the end, Vandal Savage has the War World, an alliance with Darkseid, Earth at the forefront of galactic prominence, Reach-derived technology, and the Reach are kicked off Earth.
  • Bash Brothers: Toyed with. Sportsmaster and Cheshire have amazing combat synergy with one another, but do not like each other one bit, since they are father and daughter with strong personal animosity.
  • Batman Cold Open: A staple of the show. Many episodes, including the pilot, open with the Team just completing a mission before meeting up with members of the Justice League.
  • Batman Gambit:
    • The entire pilot is one by Dubbilex, in order to free Superboy, the Genomorphs, and Cadmus from control of The Light.
    • In "Targets", Lex Luthor and Ra's Al Ghul pull one off to get this universe's versions of North and South Rhelesia united under Lexcorp's — and by extension the Light's — "guidance".
    • Kid Flash pulls this off in "Coldhearted." He realizes that Count Vertigo will always be a threat so long as he has diplomatic immunity and decides to fake the queen's death to make Vertigo think he was untouchable and admit to his attempts at killing her.
  • Battle Couple:
    • Superboy and Miss Martian after "Terrors".
    • Five years later Miss Martian is now one with Lagoon Boy.
      • Until she breaks up with him in "Intervention".
    • In "Bloodlines," Roy and Jade.
    • We finally see Wally and Artemis as one in "Summit".
  • Battle in the Center of the Mind: M'gann and Psimon have a pitched battle within her mind at the end of "Bereft" and then again in "Image". The second one leaves him in a coma for five years. When they meet for a third battle, Icicle, Jr. points out that Psimon does not have a good track record against her.
    • Lampshaded in "Before the Dawn"; when M'gann mind-rapes Kaldur for "killing" Artemis Beast Boy excitedly tells the Team they should have seen it...
      Beast Boy: ...although, actually, it didn't look like much. But I bet in their mind it was awesome!
  • Beach Episode: "Infiltrator" includes a Beach Opening Scene, complete with loving shots of Miss Martian in a two piece swimsuit and the guys shirtless.
  • Beam-O-War: In "Terrors", Icicle Jr. and Mr. Freeze use their ice beams against each other. They are too equally matched, so Superboy intervenes and takes down Mr. Freeze.
    • There's also one between Blue Beetle and Black Beetle in "Before The Dawn".
  • Be Careful What You Wish For: In "Misplaced", Zatanna told Artemis that she wished her Overprotective Dad would give her some space, and he (and the rest of the adults) disappears right then. At the end of the episode, Zatara sacrifices himself so Nabu wouldn't possess his daughter. She may never get her father back.
    • M'gann wants to avenge Artemis' death via Kaldur and she does indeed, unfortunately for everyone involved.
    • Artemis wanted to get back into the hero life more than anything despite having had a happy suburban retirement with Wally, and by the finale she's gotten exactly what she wants... but, as a kind of perverse Laser-Guided Karma punishing Artemis for her zeal, Wally dies - quite horribly - while helping to save the Earth, leaving Artemis heartbroken and alone after everything she went through for the Team as their spy. And being the team's spy wasn't exactly fun for her either
  • Becoming the Mask: The first three Reds built by T.O. Morrow (Torpedo, Inferno, and Tornado) were all intended to infiltrate the superhero societies of their time (The Justice Society of America and the later Justice League) and destroy them from within, but all three instead decided to be heroes in truth. Red Torpedo and Red Inferno eventually die protecting humanity, since even if they were never human they were always heroes.
  • Being Personal Isn't Professional: Played with. Openly, Superboy remains supportive of Nightwing after he reveals that Kaldur is a Fake Defector and Artemis is still alive and a Reverse Mole, saying that, as team leader, he had good reason to keep those secrets. Privately, he tears into Nightwing for doing so, and reveals that M'gann fried Kaldur's brain due to his actions and that they could lose all three of them if it goes badly.
  • Belligerent Sexual Tension: Kid Flash and Artemis, lampshaded by Robin in "Bereft", which saw the entire team suffer amnesia. With their memories gone, the duo spend the first half of the episode flirting with one another. The moment they get their memories back, it returns to bickering. It seems to die down once both realize Conner and M'gann are dating.
  • Benevolent Alien Invasion: The Reach are trying to come off as this and even have the backing of the United Nations. Of course, the audience knows they are actually seeking to do painful experiments on humans...
  • Berserk Button:
    • Superboy will flip out when anyone mocks his lack of acceptance from Superman.
      • And do not, under any circumstances, hurt/insult M'gann. She might be able to prevent him from ripping you limb from limb, so don't risk it.
      • Also, due to an incident with an illusion of the Joker in Mount Justice, he hates monkeys. And apes. Not that he's ever come across a normal ape or monkey, mind, nor one that isn't trying to kill him.
      • In "Agendas" he does not take being stuck in a pod wearing his Cadmus suit again very well, even though it's ostensibly meant to heal him.
    • Do not taunt Miss Martian about losing Conner's love, the team's approval, or being banished back to Mars for being a White Martian. When Psimon did it, M'gann put him into a coma.
  • Betty and Veronica:
    • Miss Martian serves as a Betty and Artemis a Veronica for Superboy. Superboy evenutally picks M'gann during the Relationship Upgrade in "Terrors".
    • Kid Flash serves as a Betty and Superboy a Veronica for Miss Martian. M'gann chooses Superboy in "Terrors".
  • Beware the Nice Ones: M'gann is usually a very sweet and heroic character. But if you try to force her to confront her Dark Secret; you might just find yourself in a coma, like what happened to Psimon in "Image".
  • Big Bad Duumvirate: The Light, which consists of Vandal Savage, Lex Luthor, Ocean Master, Queen Bee, Klarion the Witch Boy, Ra's Al Ghul and The Brain. As of season two, Black Manta has taken Ocean Master's place, after the latter suffered an unspecified "disgrace" and there are references to a "partner."
  • Big Damn Kiss:
    • Between Miss Martian and Superboy in "Terrors".
    • Between Kid Flash and Artemis, then Robin and Zatanna for New Years in the first season finale.
  • Big Eater: Wally. He manages to empty an entire bucket of ice cream within a few seconds at Jay Garrick's birthday party. Justified considering how many calories he burns running at the ridiculous speed he does.
    • Bart "Impulse" Allen as well for exactly the same reason.
  • Big Good: The Justice League itself, which the characters frequently mention as possible support when it looks like the situation is something they can not handle themselves. The League also has a rotating chairman who embodies the trope more then others.
    • Batman’s the League Chairman in Season One. He may seem (and sometimes is) hard and strict on the team, but he ultimately praises them and encourages them to work together.
    • Captain Atom becomes the League Chairman in Season Two.
    • Black Canary is made the new League Chairman in the series finale.
  • Bilingual Bonus:
    • In "Misplaced", Klarion and four other Evil Sorcerers all chant a spell by saying "Wir sind die Pfeifer von Hameln" meaning "We are the whistlers of Hamelin", in reference to The Pied Piper of Hamelin.
    • Everything Asami says is in Japanese. While her accent is lacking, it's mostly accurate and not full of eels.
  • Birds of a Feather: Surprisingly, for some, Miss Martian and Lagoon Boy are this, they both have similar backgrounds of being discriminated because of their physical appearance.
  • Bittersweet Ending:
    • "Denial" has Kent Nelson befriending Kid Flash but Kent Nelson sacrifices himself so Kid Flash does not have to be Doctor Fate, meaning Kent Nelson has to wait longer to be reunited with his wife. On the plus side, the Team managed to survive fighting Klarion.
    • "Failsafe" ends with the League alive and the Team rescued from their comas, but M'gann is emotionally traumatized and weeping over what she put the Team through by accident, and the others are heavily shaken by what they've experienced.
    • "Misplaced" ends with the kids and adults of the world reuniting happily with each other after being separate from each other by magic, but Zatanna loses her father, Zatara, who becomes Doctor Fate because he does not want his daughter to be possessed by Nabu.
    • "Image" ends with Qurac being saved from being forcibly taken over by Queen Bee's nation, Bialya, which is ruled under Bee's strict regime. Garfield Logan's life is also saved after he was nearly killed. Unfortunately, M'gann is too scared to let anyone know about her being a White Martian and so Queen Bee blackmails M'gann, after planting a post-hypnotic suggestion so Garfield will harm himself if anything happens to Queen Bee.
    • "Beneath" has Miss Martian, Bumblebee, Batgirl, and Wonder Girl stop Queen Bee's minions from kidnapping a bunch of people and shipping them off to wherever. Except that was only one batch. They still have another, and Jaime's friend Tye is part of it.
    • The final episode "Endgame", the Reach are stopped from destroying Earth, but at the cost of Kid Flash's life. Subsequently, Nightwing leaves the Team (though only temporarily, he says), Artemis becomes Tigress again (as a hero) to distance herself from her old identity as Kid Flash's partner, and Impulse inherits Wally's title. On top of that, it's revealed to the viewer that Savage took the WarWorld to Apokolips and has been aligned with Darkseid.
  • Bizarre Alien Biology:
    • Martians age about three times more slowly than humans do. So, while Miss Martian has the physical and mental maturity of a sixteen-year-old, she's really forty-eight in Earth years. And that's not even getting into her abilities...
    • Rann is host to things like living quicksand pits which burp and eliminate waste via purple flames.
  • Blackmail: Queen Bee threatens to reveal Miss Martian's Dark Secret that she's really a White Martian if M'gann does not cooperate with her. Falls apart when M'gann reveals it to the Team herself.
  • The Blank: In "The Fix", Miss Martian and Artemis make a Journey to the Center of the Mind in an attempt to repair Aqualad's shattered psyche. There they are confronted by a version of Aqualad that has no face.
  • Blatant Lies:
    • Artemis trying to explain to Robin why she's in Gotham, when he clearly knows who she is.
    • The Team's taunts when captured in various deathtraps:
      Kid Flash: You think Miss Martian is afraid of fire? She's bluffing! Do you have any idea how hot it gets in the caves of Mars?
      Superboy: And you can't drown me! I'm a Kryptonian! We don't breathe air!
  • Blonde, Brunette, Redhead:
    • A male version of the trope is in the pilot episode where the initial three team members are Aqualad (Blond), Robin (Brunet), and Kid Flash (Redhead).
    • With the addition of Zatanna in "Humanity", the Team gained a female set of Artemis (Blonde), Zatanna (Brunette) and Miss Martian (Redhead).
    • Season two gives a new set with Wonder Girl (Blonde), Bumblebee (Brunette) and Batgirl (Redhead).
  • Blood from the Mouth: Red Arrow is left coughing up blood after his beatdown from the brainwashed Aquaman and Flash.
  • Bloodless Carnage: Played with greatly in "Depths." Black Manta Kaldur appears to stab Artemis, but we see no wound at first. Then we see a spot of blood where she was stabbed later. THEN when it's revealed the whole thing was faked, we learn she was never actually stabbed in the first place, and Nightwing put a fake blood patch on her shirt.
  • Blush Sticker: Miss Martian gets these after a compliment from Superboy. Or after he takes his shirt off.
  • Body Horror:
    • Blockbuster's transformation involves his skin ripping off. When Kid Flash tries the "got your nose" trick, he does it literally.
    • Episode 4, "Drop Zone," takes it up a notch with the Blockbuster/Venom compound by having exposed muscle tissue. This is revisited in "Alpha Male", only with animals exposed to the compound this time and looking about as horrific as before.
    • After Neutron explodes in "Bloodlines", we get to see him slowly reassemble his body atom-by-atom, at one point showing his skeletal system and muscles forming.
  • Bonding Over Missing Parents: Impulse and Blue Beetle bond in "Satisfaction", after Bart learns Jaime never knew his mentor, just like Bart before he came back in time.
    • Implied with Robin and Zatanna.
  • Bookcase Passage: Played very straight in "Homefront". Lampshaded no less:
    Robin: There's a secret passage behind one of these bookcases.
    Artemis: Seriously? Cliche much?
    Robin: You should see the Batcave...
  • Book Ends: The episode "Insecurity" has opening and closing scenes taking place at night, in a bedroom, between a father and daughter, with the dads even calling their daughters by the term of endearment, "baby girl". While Mr. Jones was likely sincere in his affection towards his daughter, Sportsmaster's use of the term was straight up psychological manipulation; attempting to regress Artemis back to when he could dominate her will.
    • The series started on July 4th in-universe and ends on July 4th.
  • Bookshelf Dominoes: Red Inferno does this in an attempt to trap Robin and Artemis as the two heroes flee through the base library in "Homefront".
  • Borrowed Catchphrase:
    • Wally has borrowed M'gann's catchphrase as "Hello, Wally!", and even "Hello, Megan!"
    • In season two, Beast Boys adopts Kid Flash's "Souvenir!" as his own. This is lampshaded by Blue Beetle when Impulse borrows it himself.
  • Bound and Gagged:
    • Used to neutralize Zatanna's vocal powers in "Secrets".
    • The Riddler is bound and gagged by an annoyed Zatanna in "Usual Suspects".
    • Used to neutralize Black Canary in "Auld Acquaintance".
    • Done to Mr. Haley so that Parasite could use his shape-shifting powers to replace him in "Performance".
  • Brainwashed and Crazy:
    • The Guardian and Superboy suffered from this in the first episode.
    • "Bloodlines" has Neutron brainwashed and controlled by unidentified aliens.
    • Blue Beetle suffers from this as revealed in "The Runaways". Green Beetle pretended he was a hero of Mars who could control his scarab and tricked Blue Beetle into letting him brainwash him by saying he was "fixing" his scarab.
  • Break the Cutie:
    • "Failsafe" is an entire episode dedicated to breaking Miss Martian and, in the next episode, revealed that it had broken Robin as well.
    • Zatanna in "Misplaced".
    • "Image" revealed Miss Martian's Dark Secret and revealed just how deeply the truth had scarred her.
  • Brick Joke: In "Humanity" the kids tell Captain Marvel that they will join him outside to play with Wolf, but instead they run off on a mission. At the end of the episode he runs back into the base and asks if the kids are coming outside or not.
  • Broad Strokes: The show draws material from Young Justice, Teen Titans, and other parts of the DC mythos.
  • Broken Aesop: The Forever People claim that Superboy has no right to keep the New Genisphere because he views it as a possession, whereas on New Genesis she is recognized as a living, intelligent being. When Superboy protests, pointing out that he does accept the Sphere as alive, the Forever People give her to him; despite pointing out how important it is to respect the Sphere's intelligence and wishes, at no point do they ask what the Sphere wants to do.
  • Broken Bird: Artemis, but she is slowly getting better.
  • Brooding Boy, Gentle Girl: Superboy and M'gann.
  • Brown Note: The Apokoliptian reanimation machine in "Salvage" emits a signal which causes Blue Beetle great pain, evidently because the technology isn't compatible with the Scarab.
  • Brought to You by the Letter "S":
    • Each Robins' costume has a stylized "R" over the left breast.
    • Superboy's costume, like Superman's, has the classic S-shield on the chest.
    • The insignia on the uniforms and tanks of the Bialyan soldiers is an Arabic letter B.
    • Wonder Girl, who joins the cast in season two, sports a stylized "W" on her shirt.
  • Bus Crash: Tula/Aquagirl, Aqualad's childhood friend, and Marie Logan, Beast Boy's mother, were both killed in the five-year Time Skip separating seasons one and two.
  • Bus Full of Innocents: A recurring trope during crises in the show. For some reason, rickety bridges seem to be a magnet for trouble and buses.
  • Busman's Holiday: When seven female heroes gather to throw Rocket a bridal shower in "Satisfaction," Captain Cold decides to rob a bank next to their picnic. When Cold notices them coming to thwart him, he can only remark that he is completely doomed.
  • But Not Too Black:
    • Aqualad has blond hair and gray eyes. Averted for his counterpart in DC Comics, who is based on his appearance in this series, where he has dark hair and eyes.
    • Artemis is bi-racial, with naturally blonde hair despite her Vietnamese mother. Greg Weisman says this is based on a girl he knows who is half-Korean and has naturally blonde hair.
  • Call a Human a "Meatbag":
    • Red Volcano dismisses the Team as worthless humans. Superboy and Miss Martian both protest that they aren't human, so Volcano surmises that "meatbag" would make a better blanket term. It is later applied affectionately to Red Tornado when the group discuss how he is becoming humanized through interaction with them.
    • Black Beetle uses "Meat" as a derogatory term. Impulse uses it in his Future Slang as well because The Reach have taken over Earth in his Bad Future.
      Impulse: What kind of meat is this guy? He's never gonna hit us with those.
  • Call Back:
    • Robin observes in the pilot episode that people are always overwhelmed or underwhelmed, but never simply "whelmed." He makes the same observation again in "Bereft", unaware that he has made it before due to a six-month Mind Wipe. He says it again in "Misplaced", advising Zatanna to try to stay whelmed when her father vanishes with the other adults. Since then, members of the team refer to being "whelmed" so often it is almost a catch phrase.
    • After Kid Flash tricks Count Vertigo into confessing to regicide and brings Queen Perdita her new transplant heart in "Coldhearted," Robin congratulates him for "saving an entire country." In "Image," after the team saves the president of Qurac from Psimon's mind control and Robin comes up with the idea of having Miss Martian impersonate Queen Bee to make clear that she was the bad guy, Kid Flash says the same thing back to him.
    • In "Usual Suspects", Batman asks the Team if "this sounds familiar" as he dresses them down for hacking League systems and ignoring protocol, ending in the successful capture of several villains and revealing a hidden plot against the League. This, of course, is exactly what happened in the pilot.
    • The second season premiere ends in much the same way as the pilot: three kid superheroes rescue innocents from a secret underground facility, and watch in awe as the entire Justice League, initially silhouetted against the moon, comes to greet them. Both scenes even have the same music.
    • The mission in "Alienated" has a few parallels to the mission in "Drop-Zone." They're both recon missions to an island that the team enters in different drop-zones, with the Atlantean members going through the water beneath. This is probably how Kaldur was able to spot the team and Leaguers so quickly. Both missions go off the rails, though our heroes manage all right. "Drop-Zone" is also the episode that establishes Aqualad as reluctant leader of the team and Robin as the probable future leader. "Alienated" has two face-offs between current leader Nightwing and former leader Aqualad.
    • Aqualad's brief confrontation with Superboy in "Alienated" mirrors their battle in the pilot episode. Aqualad attempts to subdue Superboy with an electrical attack, only this time it is powerful enough to knock him unconscious, as opposed to the pilot, where Superboy simply shrugged it off.
    • In "Welcome to Happy Harbor," M'gann is a bit confused about when it is okay to read people's minds. When Aqualad orders her to read Mister Twister's mind, she brings up what they said earlier and an exasperated Robin jumps in with "It's OKAY if it's the bad guys!" Five years later in "Depths," Superboy calls her out for her tendency to Mind Rape opponents to get information. Her response?
      M'gann: "They're the bad guys!"
    • In "Before the Dawn", Virgil is locked in the room with Black Beetle and the Team and watches him take down most of them. In "The Hunt", he tells this to the rest of the Runaways when Black Beetle shows up.
    • At the end of "Endgame", having the Justice League on the ground with the Team floating down to surround them, calls back to the end of the first episode, only reversed. It helps reinforce the fact that the Team is finally and truly on equal footing with the League
  • Calling Your Attacks: Amazo has to say the name of whatever Justice League member whose powers it has copied before it can use them. Given that Amazo is a robot, and that this was his first ever appearance within the continuity of the show, this is more understandable than most examples. Although this provides a clue to Amazo's weakness, and the team use that to defeat it.
    • Captain Marvel would sometimes announce or reference which of his powers he was using at a time, whether it was using the Power of Zeus and Speed of Mercury to drill into the ground, or cite the Wisdom of Solomon as the source of his good advice.
  • The Cameo:
  • Canon Foreigner:
    • Wolf.
    • The Terror Twins.
    • Green Beetle.
  • Canon Immigrant: As of Brightest Day #4, Aqualad is now a dread-locked black kid called Jackson Hyde (Kaldur'ahm is his Atlantean name), living in New Mexico, making his status in Young Justice official canon. Greg Weisman said that he, Vietti, and Phil Bourassa — lead character designer of the show — created the character, but Geoff Johns liked the new Aqualad so much that he wanted to bring him over to main continuity.
  • Can't Kill You, Still Need You: When their control over the Justice League is broken, Vandal Savage tells Klarion to retreat. Klarion argues that he could beat the Team given the chance, but Savage counters that he'd probably destroy the Watchtower in doing so, and they need the League alive for the next phase of their plan...though having the League alive doesn't actually seem necessary through the next season.
  • Carnival of Killers: "Infiltrator"
  • Catch Phrase:
  • Captain Ersatz: Tye, Ed and Sam all fill this for the Captain Ethnic Super Friends (see below), but Virgil (Static) takes the cake. He's a character in his own right that was trained on Static Shock by an Ersatz of Black Lightning and his Ersatz Black Vulcan of the Super Friends. On this show, however, Virgil is an Ersatz/replacement for Black Vulcan, the Ersatz of Black Lightning, who's already showed up. Confusion much.
  • Captain Ethnic: Tye Longshadow, Ed Dorado, Asami Koizumi, and Virgil Hawkins; the first three are tasteful, Ethnic Scrappy-averting reimaginings of Apache Chief, El Dorado, and Samurai from Super Friends, and Virgil (Static) replaces Black Vulcan. They seem to be pretty popular in the fandom so far.
  • Cardboard Prison: Belle Reve, a supervillain penitentiary run by Amanda Waller, strong enough to contain Superman himself. They checked. It takes one episode for an escape plan to be implemented.
  • Changing of the Guard: Although the show is an ensemble cast, in the first season Superboy was a major character and his character arc was one of the main storylines. In the second, the focus shifted mainly to Blue Beetle, so early on the two team-up for an episode, cementing Superboy's development into a superhero in his own right while establishing Beetle as the rookie with a dark secret. Since then Superboy's screentime have been drastically reduced, while Jamie's part of the Spotlight-Stealing Squad.
  • Character Development:
    • Over the course of the series, Superboy is learning to work with his teammates and accept their own personal strengths and weaknesses. He is particularly learning to appreciate their skills in relation to his own, understanding that having super strength does not automatically make him superior.
    • Aqualad emerges as the leader of the Team, although he claims it is only until Robin is ready for the position, after everybody gets in each others way trying to take charge. "Downtime" focused on his conflicting loyalties, and divided attention, between Atlantis and the surface world, as well as his final realization that, whatever he decides, he has to commit completely. The climax of "Alpha Male" has him cementing his place as the leader in the face of criticism from his teammates.
    • Red Arrow is starting to defrost. A little. He gets a big helping of humble pie at the end of season one, which unfortunately prompts a whole lot of self-hatred.
    • Artemis learns to trust her team, and become more relaxed, eventually retiring from hero-ing with her boyfriend Wally, who has also matured.
    • Miss Martian becomes more sure of herself and less submissive, eventually stepping into a leadership role in season 2. Unfortunately, she also seems to have become a little grey in morality terms, with a willingness to Mind Rape enemies.
      • Also to note Miss Martian stopped saying "Hello Megan" in season 2 and has become more serious, likely caused by the death of Beast Boy's mom who was her human inspiration.
    • Robin I/Nightwing started off eager to lead just because he felt he deserved to be leader, but he concludes he is not ready yet, and nominates Aqualad instead. His first actual brush with being in charge not only killed that desire, but also prompted the painful epiphany that, even though he does want to fight crime, he does not have that drive-bordering-on-obsession that Batman does.
    • By the time Season 2 rolls around, all the team members from Season 1 have become more "professional" when heroing is involved.
  • Character Focus: According to Word of God, episodes 3-8 are focused on a particular member of the Team — "Happy Harbor" was M'gann, "Drop Zone" was Robin, "Schooled" was Superboy, "Infiltrator" was Artemis, "Denial" was Kid Flash, and "Downtime" was Aqualad. Red Arrow gets his own in "Targets" while "Bloodlines" was about Impulse. "Satisfaction" was about Arsenal, the original Roy Harper.
  • Chekhov's Gun:
    • The arrow Robin picks up and Kid Flash saves as a souvenir in "Schooled" becomes critical to the plot of "Homefront."
    • Dr. Fate's helmet from "Denial" becomes a key point in "Revelation" and returns in "Misplaced" but in "Misplaced" it does not come off.
    • Garfield Logan received a blood transfusion from from Miss Martian, with a focus on his new eye color at the close of the episode. By season two, he has gained shapeshifting powers and joined the Team as Beast Boy.
    • The temple in Bialya that Bumblebee and Batgirl stumble upon in "Beneath" gains a lot more significance in "Intervention". It turns out the the temple was used to cleanse the scarab beetle of the Reach's influence 4000 years prior. It was used again to cleanse both Blue Beetle and Green Beetle's scarabs after they came under the influence of the Reach again.
  • Child Soldiers:
    • The Team becomes a black ops unit for the Justice League. The Light quickly realizes the implications of this, and it is brought up and Lampshaded repeatedly, most memorably by an almost exasperated Mr. Twister when Robin protests that they are not children while he curb stomps them.
      Mr. Twister: "Objectively, you are. Have you no adult supervision? I find your presence here quite disturbing."
    • When discussing the possibility of adding new members to the Justice League, Batman supports keeping Captain Marvel in the League, despite the reveal that he is actually only ten years old. Wonder Woman finds his support less than reassuring since he indoctrinated Robin into crimefighting at nine. Batman explains that he did that to Robin in order to keep Robin from turning out like himself.
    • Taken to the extreme with Superboy, as he was sixteen weeks, a.k.a. four months, an age when most babies are only just starting to sleep through the night, when he is introduced, and just so happens to be artificially aged to the developmental equivalent of a sixteen year old.
  • Children Raise You: Red Tornado reveals that while he was chosen as the Team's den mother because he had no secret identity double life to live, he grew to relish the activity as a way of learning how to act more human, since the Justice League are far too controlled and stiff to be a good representation of human interaction.
  • Chromatic Arrangement: Gamma Squad in the first episode of the second season. Composed of Robin (red), Blue Beetle (blue), and Lagoon Boy (green).
  • Clark Kenting: No one on the Team (except Kid Flash) knows Robin's identity and when he is in civilian attire around them he uses a pair of sunglasses to keep them from seeing his face.
    • This makes sense as they cover about the same amount of his face as his mask
  • Clear My Name: In season two, the six members of the Justice League that had been sent off-world by Vandal Savage accept a trial to prove that they were not responsible.
  • Cloning Blues:
    • Superboy, being only 16 weeks old at the time of the series, but physically around his mid-teens. When discussing adding new members to the League, the adult characters discuss the issues that arise from the conflict between his biological and chronological age, and the problems stemming therefrom.
    • The first season finale reveals that the Red Arrow we have seen throughout the entire show's run is actually a clone of the real one, replaced three years before the show even began. He does not take this revelation well. In a refreshing take, the original Roy Harper harbors absolutely no hostility towards his clone, and is in fact appreciative of the clone rescuing him.
  • Clothing Damage:
    • In "Bereft," after Superboy loses his memory he rips the "S" insignia off his shirt when M'gann (also suffering amnesia) wonders if he is Superman. Superboy does not have a super suit so this happens to him a lot.
    • In "Targets", Aqualad's tracksuit gets blown off by Cheshire's bomb, exposing his costume underneath.
  • Color-Coded Characters: On top of Blue Beetle, we now have Black Beetle and Green Beetle
    Impulse: How many colors do these guys come in anyways?
  • Combat Stilettos: Averted for the most part since Phil Bourassa designed the costumes to be reasonably practical, if not realistic. Special mention goes to Zatanna, whose normal costume includes raised heels, comments that her shoes were not made for 'chase scenes' and uses magic to change them to flat sole shoes.
  • Comic Book Movies Dont Use Code Names: Mostly averted, but a few examples do play it straight.
    • Professor Desmond doesn't call himself Blockbuster; that's just the name of the serum that gave him his powers.
    • Black Beetle doesn't go by any Code Name and is known as "the Partner" in his first few appearances. Black Beetle is just an offhanded nickname Wonder Girl comes up with.
      • Subverted in that Black Beetle is actually his name. He's called that by the Reach too.
  • Comicbook Time: T.O. Morrow was building robotic infiltrators to destroy the Justice Society of America back during World War II, and is still building robotic infiltrators to destroy the Justice League. It turns out T.O. Morrow is actually a bed-ridden, decrepit old man, who built a robotic version of himself to continue his work.
  • Compilation Movie: Independence Day was advertised as such.
  • Complaining About Rescues They Don't Like:
    • Dr. Roquette never stopped snarking while being rescued and protected.
    • When the Team makes a detour to rescue a woman and her son from a stampede caused by an invasion force, the woman points out that their interference will likely draw a stronger reprisal. Superboy also injured one of the animals. Nevertheless, she is thankful for the assistance.
    • Cheshire makes no secret of the fact that she is not happy with Sportsmaster coming to rescue her from Red Arrow. He's the father she hates and ran away from home to escape. No wonder she's not happy.
  • Completely Missing the Point: T.O. Morrow recounts the story of the Prodigal Son to Red Tornado, clearly feeling that it parallels their situation. He does this while subjecting Red Tornado to what is a horrific torture. And he doesn't seem to see how this in fact is the exact opposite of the story of the Prodigal Son.
  • Composite Character:
    • Artemis, a combination of Arrowette (Cissie King-Jones) and Tigress III (Artemis Crock).
    • Red Inferno, who in the show was originally known as the heroine Firebrand before being destroyed and rebuilt. In the comics, they are two separate characters with absolutely no relation.
    • The Golden Age and modern versions of Red Torpedo were combined into one character.
    • Queen Bee is based off the 80's JLI incarnation, but possesses the mind-control powers of the Silver Age original.
    • Klarion the Witch Boy is a composite of Klarion the Witch Boy and a Lord of Chaos known as The Child.
    • While Match uses many elements from the comic character of the same name, the black sclera and Superman-logo carved into his own chest are taken from Superboy Prime's design, and the explanation for his mental instability and backwards S from versions of Bizarro.
    • Beast Boy's biological mother, Marie Logan, is an ex-actress like Rita Farr, his adoptive mom from the comics. Interestingly Rita also appears on Hello Megan, apparently playing Megan's best friend.
  • Concealment Equals Cover: Justified in "Satisfaction". When Lex Luthor's office is hit by a rocket and he survives behind his desk with Mercy, he explains that this is why he paid so much for a custom desk.
  • Conflicting Loyalty: In "Downtime", Aqualad is torn between being on the Team and Atlantis (in particular, his crush Tula).
  • Continuity Nod:
    • "Denial" shows that Kid Flash actually has a room full of shelves where he keeps the 'souvenirs' he picks up every episode. The shelf reappears in many following episodes, each time with more and more souvenirs. In Season 2, Beast Boy continues this tradition.
    • Artemis is placed in danger of drowning in the episodes "Homefront," "Alpha Male" and "Revelation," which each aired one week after the other. In each near-drowning she complains at how frequently it occurs, finally revealing that she now carries artificial gills because of what has happened.
    • In "Revelation" The Helm of Nabu is used as a last resort in the battle against the Injustice League to allow Aqualad to become Dr. Fate. Kid Flash worried that Nabu would not let Aqualad free, as he had earlier threatened to do to Kid Flash in "Denial". Later, in "Misplaced" the Helm of Nabu is used again in another desperate situation, ultimately resulting in Giovanni Zatara becoming the new Dr. Fate permanently to spare his daughter Zatanna.
    • In "Schooled", each of the Team's members were given motorcycles as part of an undercover mission, and Conner eventually abandoned his after gaining the Super-Cycle in "Disordered". Conner's motorcycle reappeared in "Secrets", where it was used by Zatanna.
    • In "Schooled", Superboy says "I hate monkeys" when fighting robot ones. He repeats this when encountering all kinds of simians, including the villainous Monsieur Mallah and Ultra-Humanite and a normal pet monkey. In season 2 Superboy fights alongside Beast Boy, who shape-shifts into a gorilla (and whose default form is a monkey-boy), softening his stance toward monkeys.
    • In "Misplaced," Kid Flash explains to Artemis that Dr. Fate previously defeated Klarion the Witch Boy by attacking Teek'l, his cat familiar ("Denial").
    • During a mission, Kid Flash suffers a broken arm and the cast does not come off until several episodes later.
    • The South Rhelasian Prime Minister from Season 1 has become Secretary-General of the United Nations in Season 2.
    • In "Alienated", just before J'onn leaves to stand trial, he asks M'gann to water his plants while he's gone. In "Cornered", when M'gann disguises herself as her uncle and moves into his apartment, the first thing she does is water the plants.
  • Continuous Decompression:
    • In the season 1 finale, Aqualad, Artemis, and Kid Flash decompress the Watchtower cargo bay to beat Aquaman, Green Arrow, and the Flash. The resulting suction effect knocks them off their feet, then Aqualad shuts their door so they slam into it instead of getting dumped into space.
    • In "War", Arsenal opens an airlock on the WarWorld when he fears capture by Blue Beetle. While the WarWorld doesn't appear to have many interior bulkheads and the door isn't open all that long, the decompression remains steady even though it's pointed out after the fact that the air supply in the room has severely diminished.
  • Convection Schmonvection:
    • The lava in Doctor Fate's tower was only a danger on direct contact with it (well, not to Superboy, but he lost his favorite boots to it). Aqualad and Miss Martian were fazed by its presence, but only because they are particularly vulnerable to heat. Of course, it's then discussed when a floor closes over the lava pit at the last second, and the Team is amazed that they're not frying just from standing on the floor inches above a lava pit. Hey, it's magic.
    • In "Humanity", the Team battles Red Volcano in the middle of an active lava flow with no negative affects until Volcano causes a flame bloom right next to M'gann.
  • Conversational Troping: Impulse uses the term "Big Bad" to describe Jaime's evil future self. Tigress also uses the term to describe Black Manta.
  • Cool Big Sis: Miss Martian becomes this to Beast Boy in the second season.
  • Cool Bikes:
    • All of the Team had them in "Schooled".
    • Sphere can turn into one.
    • Zatanna and Artemis had them in "Secrets". Harm blew them up.
  • Cool Mask:
    • Cheshire wears a stylized mask reminiscent of her namesake. It's full of cool ninja gadgetry like thermal goggles and a rebreather of course.
    • Sportmaster sports a particularly menacing hockey mask.
  • Cool Starship:
    • Miss Martian owns one, which serves as the Team's main transport.
    • John Stewart's ring creates a very spiffy interstellar transport vessel at the end of "Alienated".
  • A Couple And Their Dog: Wally and Artemis adopt their own dog at college in the second season.
  • Covered in Gunge: Superboy ends up on the receiving end of this when he's helping Miss Martian cook, and she tosses ingredients at him faster than he can catch.
  • Crazy Enough to Work: In "Humanity," the Team reasons that Batman would have used every rational method possible to find T.O. Morrow, so they have to come up with a really stupid idea. Fortunately, Wally had one (interrogating Morrow's rival, Professor Ivo... which actually is not a crazy plan at all.)
  • Creator Cameo: Greg Weisman voices Snapper Carr.
  • Creepy Child: Greta Hayes, aka "Secret". Also, Klarion the Witch Boy.
  • Crossover: With Conan O'Brien... sort of. The WB lets Conan use clips from the Young Justice series, with a character in each sequence edited out and replaced by Conan's alter ego, the Flaming C. (So far, across multiple clips, he's replaced Superman, Batman, Dr. Fate, Superboy, and Aqualad.)
  • Culture Clash:
    • Aqualad has to tell Miss Martian to tone down the casual telepathy which, whilst common on Mars, is an invasion of privacy on Earth. Later, Black Canary also has to explain to Megan that on Earth, taking on the form of another person and snogging while dressed as them can lead to bad situations.
    • As time goes by the team adopts the Martian attitude on casual telepathy to the point where others have to tell them it is rude to be having a psychic conversation that excludes other people in the same room.
  • Curb-Stomp Battle:
    • The series opens with Robin, Aqualad, Speedy and Kid Flash each facing their own ice-themed villain and defeating them with ease, some might even say contempt, with their only concern being that the fight will make them late for their meeting with the Justice League. In "Terrors", Batman notes that they seemed to have been taken down just a little too easily, and the Team eventually discovers that they were planning to all get captured and sent to Belle Reve so they could stage a mass-breakout.
    • When Kid Flash, Aqualad, and Robin free Superboy in the pilot, he soundly beats all three of them unconscious within a minute.
    • When Black Canary is introduced as the Team's combat trainer both Kid Flash and Superboy believe their powers will give them the easy advantage over her. She defeats them both, knocking each to the ground with only a single move.
    • Bane is on the receiving end of two in "Drop Zone". In the first he manages to land precisely one totally ineffective punch on Mammoth who then proceeds to wipe the floor with him and in the second his master plan to blow up the YJ team ends with him being disarmed by Kid Flash, immobilized by Miss Martian and punched into the middle of next week by Superboy.
    • Red Arrow gets one from the tag team of Sportsmaster and Cheshire in "Targets".
    • In "Before the Dawn" Black Beetle manages to take out Wonder Girl, Superboy, Lagoon Boy, Robin, and traps a phase shifting Miss Martian. Black Beetle just finished slamming Wonder Girl's head into a wall eleven times in a row before Blue Beetle shows up and manages to be on even footing.
    • In "Complications", Sportsmaster absolutely destroys Black Manta in a one-sided battle, despite Manta having back up.
  • Curse Cut Short: From "Secrets". Doubles as an Oh Crap moment.
    Harm: *notices the gas running from the stove, then Artemis' arrow lighting up in hand* Oh, that little-
  • Cursed with Awesome: Due to being a clone, Superboy will never visibly age. Alanna points out that means Conner will always be good looking, but Superboy still views it as a negative. Also lampshaded by Superboy:
    Superboy: Standard blessing and curse.
  • Cute Machines: The robo-sphere from "Bereft."
  • Danger Room Cold Open: One episode incorporates one of these as its entire plot. The Team (and therefore the viewer) doesn't know that it's fake due to the emotional distress of their psychic teammate.
  • Dangerous Sixteenth Birthday: Wally goes on his first solo mission on his 16th birthday.
  • Dark and Troubled Past: Artemis, Miss Martian, Superboy, Nightwing.
  • Darker and Edgier:
    • "Failsafe," though it treated the initial defeats with a lack of gravitas, followed the team as they were slowly defeated and killed off one by one, although it was just a simulation.
      • Although it's played with throughout the episode: first, they think that the beams are just transporting everyone to a holding-area, and they hold on to that thought. It's not till right up at the end that they acknowledge that they're just killing people. Although, of course, it turns out to all just be a simulation.
    • "Secrets" was quite a large departure from the rest of the series due to its very dark ending. Specifically, the Villain of the Week murdered his own sister to gain supernatural powers. The sister's ghost could only say the word "secret", and Artemis and Zatanna find out at the end that "secret" was the very last word she saw when she died. It was also the series' Halloween episode.
    • The second season in general seems to be much darker than the first.
    • The series as a whole is entirely darker to any past DC Animated Adaptation that are not the DC Universe Animated Original Movies. Barring, of course, Batman: The Animated Series.
      • Justice League could certainly give it a run for it's money with a character dying on screen only to come back wrong seeking a mercy kill.
    • The comic miniseries World Without Grownups was largely Played for Laughs, with the average kid's reaction to the missing adults being a few minutes of fear and confusion followed by the realisation they can do whatever they like. It also doesn't mention babies or other children incapable of, for example, fixing themselves a sandwich. The episode based on it, "Misplaced", is more realistic in its portrayal of how traumatic this would be.
  • Dark Reprise: The Young Justice: Invasion opening music is nearly identical to the original, but ends with a foreboding low tone compared to the original's upbeat, heroic theme.
  • Dark Is Not Evil: The demon-like "Genomorphs" are actually the victims, and providing assistance to the heroes, in the first episode.
  • Dark Secret:
    • Artemis doesn't want anyone finding out about her family's ties to villainy, to the point where she let Cheshire escape to keep it a secret.
    • M'gann is terrified of everyone finding out that her true form is, to human eyes, monstrous-looking. She psi-blasted her own team and blamed it on Psimon to prevent them finding out.
    • Superboy using shield patches to suppress his human DNA and give him Superman's full power set. And his human father is Lex Luthor.
    • Played with, then ultimately defied by Jaime Reyes. The episode after he finds out he's going to go back on mode and betray the team in the future, he hesitates for a while, and then reveals the truth to the League and the Team at the episode's end.
  • Dark-Skinned Blond: Aqualad.
    • Artemis could certainly count, being half-Vietnamese.
  • Dating Catwoman: Red Arrow and Cheshire. The two eventually marry.
  • Day In The Life: "Downtime," sort of, in that it focuses on the characters' home lives instead of any sort of mission. (Though Kaldur's A-plot winds up including a big battle anyway.)
  • Deadline News: In "Failsafe", this happens to Iris West-Allen. Fortunately, it wasn't real.
  • Death by Irony:
    • Poachers shot dead by a gorilla with a machine gun.
    • Red Volcano was dropped into a volcano, though he showed up alive and well next season.
  • Death by Origin Story: While discussing Blue Beetle's origin in "Salvage", we learn that Ted Kord was killed after supposedly creating the Scarab that ended up bonding with Jaime.
  • Decomposite Character: Roy Harper. The one we know turns out to be a clone of the original, who was abducted before the show even began. Eventually the original is recovered and the two wind up splitting elements of Roy from the comic: the clone keeps the name Red Arrow and has a relationship and child with Cheshire, while the original, who lost his arm, takes the name Arsenal.
  • Defusing The Tykebomb: Aqualad was the one to break through to Superboy and convince him to help them escape.
  • Derailing Love Interests: M'gann's antiheroic activities have caused Conner to dump her.
  • Deus Exit Machina: Klarion full stop. He has more power than all the Team and most of the Justice League put together (Savage said that if he fought the team he could lose control and destroy the Watchtower) so in order for the good guys to have a chance of winning he has to be absent most of the time.
  • Die Hard on an X: The episode "Homefront" features Robin and Artemis, the Team Badass Normals, on the run from superpowered elemental androids while trying to rescue the rest of their team.
  • Digging Yourself Deeper: Defied by Nightwing in "Beneath". When Batgirl claims he would never try to justify sending an all-male team on a mission note , Nightwing nervously responds that there's no right way to answer that and closes the channel.
  • Diplomatic Impunity: Apparently, diplomatic immunity means that you can not go to jail for teaming up with villains like The Joker and unleashing giant mutant plants upon the world, so long as your country of origin isn't affected.
  • Disappeared Dad: Garfield's origin story usually includes the death of his mother and father, but Mark Logan is curiously absent in this continuity. Greg Weisman even reveals that Garfield uses his mother's maiden name.
  • Do Not Adjust Your Set:
    • The Injustice League broadcasts their ransom demand ($10 billion) across all the world's satellite signals.
    • Robin hijacks the world's television signals to give an inspiring speech to humanity after the League is defeated in "Failsafe."
    • In "Misplaced," the Team sends a message to the kids of the world to reassure them that somebody is looking for the adults, and that they need to work together until their parents come back.
  • Does Not Like Shoes: Both Aquaman and Aqualad go barefoot in costume, but when Aqualad is in civvies he wears sandals.
  • Does This Remind You of Anything?:
    • The history of Rhelasia, as well as the name of North Rhelesia's leader, is based on Korea's history prior to the Korean War and Syngman Rhee, the first president of South Korea. The uniforms of the North Rhelasian soldier bodyguards are based on the uniforms worn by Korean People's Army soldiers.
      • The fact that this event takes place in Taipei also brings to mind the issues of unification and independence between China and Taiwan.
    • After the Time Skip, Red Arrow looks like he has not shaved nor cut his hair in a long while, stumbles and falls while moving around, and steals some of the money he stops a robber from taking. His comic incarnation was a former heroin addict.
      • His intervention is even less subtle about this. Between the "used to treat your body like a temple" dialogue, a former enabler to his self-destructive actions, a guy used to be just like him and quit the habit and friends who state that they were his friends before this was a problem, they get the metaphor very thin.
  • A Dog Named Dog:
  • Domestic Abuse: Heavily implied in "Beneath".
  • Double Entendre: Of the rare non-sexual type, in the second season Lagoon Boy, an Atlantean fish-boy, refers to someone who has just insulted him as 'Chum'.
  • Double Take: Wally's reaction to seeing M'gann using her shape-shifting powers to grow extra limbs in "Schooled". He suffers a brief freak-out.
  • Dragon Ascendant: Black Beetle takes over the Reach from the Reach Ambassador after declaring him unfit to lead.
  • Dramatic Drop: Played for Laughs in "Satisfaction"; when Captain Cold uses a giant freeze ray to freeze most of a street and the armored car he was targeting, he leaves that behind and pulls out his ice hammer to get the money free. Then the seven super-heroines he froze by mistake bust out and confront him, causing him to drop his lame excuse for a weapon.
  • Dressed in Layers: Aqualad does it under his standard civilian clothes, a turquoise track suit.
  • Dressing as the Enemy:
    • Aqualad and Garth attempt this tactic, but they are recognized by Black Manta almost immediately (Aqualad's waterbearers gave him away).
    • Superboy and Miss Martian disguise themselves as the Terror Twins in order to infiltrate Belle Reeve Penitentiary.
    • At the end of "Alienated", Lagoon Boy boards the Bioship to see two Kroloteans manning it. They turn out to be Miss Martian and Martian Manhunter in disguise.
    • In "Beneath", Miss Martian takes out and replaces Shimmer by assuming her form. The real Shimmer is left sealed up inside an oil drum.
    • Numerous times in "Summit". Miss Martian replaces Deathstroke to infiltrate the meeting between the Light and the Reach, and almost half the team is revealed to be in disguise as the Light's backup.
  • Drink Order: A variation in "Schooled", where Batman and Superman meet at a restaurant and order dessert—apple pie for Superman and devil's food cake for Batman.
  • Driven to Suicide: The Two Beings, One Body mentioned below, once freed from Intergang's control, tries to overload a nuclear power plant just to end its tortured existence. When Blue Beetle is about to get through to it, Black Beetle destroys it, reasoning that it was better off dead than an ally of their enemies.
  • Dude, Where's My Respect?: Speedy feels that the Justice League's decision to only give the teenage heroes access to the gym and library is evidence of their lack of respect, and the rest of the Team eventually comes to share his feelings. However, whereas the others are willing to accept that they are young and still have more to learn, Speedy feels that the four of them already earned complete equality. It is later revealed that there is a reason for his extreme reaction. But even without that he's kind of a jerk.
    • Wally has a similar reaction when he alone does not get to team up with their mentors (Flash instead takes Super Boy), instead given the task of running a human heart across the entire country in a mere matter of hours - something only he can do (Flash must be seen fighting the opposition). By the end of the episode he understands though.
  • Dying to Be Replaced: We find out that Jaime Reyes became the new Blue Beetle after Ted Kord, the previous Blue Beetle, was murdered by the Light.
  • Dynamic Entry: Batman is the master of these, doing this in the pilot episode (and his first appearance) and also in the beginning of "Downtime."
  • Early-Bird Cameo: Karen Beecher appears as a classmate of Superboy and Miss Martian in several episodes of season one; during the Halloween episode she is dressed as Bumblebee, the superhero identity she had in the comics which she did not assume until season two of the series.
  • Earth Is the Center of the Universe: Vandal Savage believes it should be, at least.
  • Earth-Shattering Kaboom: This is what Black Beetle plans to do to the Earth in the episode "Endgame". It is up to earth's heroes to find all of his bombs and deactivate them before this can happen.
  • Easter Egg: In the episode "Image", Gar Logan has a poster of Aqualad. Seen here: [1].
  • Eating Lunch Alone: In "Terrors", the Riddler is regarded as such a loser that none of the other supervillains will let him sit with them in the Belle Reve dining hall.
  • Elaborate Underground Base: Mount Justice, the original headquarters of the Justice League.
  • El Cid Ploy: Miss Martian and Superboy don the costumes of Martian Manhunter and Superman in order to convince the world that the older, more powerful heroes are still on Earth.
  • Emergency Transformation: Miss Martian gives a blood transfusion to the dying Garfield Logan by shapeshifting her cells to match his blood type when no other suitable donors are available, unintentionally turning him into a shape-shifter too.
  • Emotionally Tongue Tied: Superboy spends episode 3 uncertain on how to apologize to Miss Martian after he lashes out at her for using telepathy.
  • Enemy Mine: The Team works with Bane in order to stop Kobra. Of course, Bane betrays them.
    • The Team and Justice League have to team up with Lex Luthor to save the world from the Reach's endgame.
  • Engineered Public Confession: Kid Flash pulls this on Count Vertigo to get his diplomatic immunity revoked.
    • The Team pulls this on the Light and the Reach in "Summit", recording their Summit with each other. They then show it too the UN, completely exposing the Reach's invasion and obliterating their Villain with Good Publicity status.
  • Everybody Knew Already: Of the secrets revealed in "Usual Suspects", only Superboy's is truly unknown to the others. Robin had already deduced that Artemis was related to Sportsmaster and Cheshire, while Superboy found out about Miss Martian's true white form from their mind meld in Bialya.
  • Everyone Can See It: In "Revelations", Robin and Aqualad discuss the relationships of the Team and Aqualad comments that he knew M'gann and Superboy liked each other before they had figured it out themselves. They also wonder if they should let Artemis and Kid Flash know that they (Artemis and Kid Flash) like each other, as it will probably take a while for them to figure it out on their own.
  • Everything Is Online: Averted in "Infiltrator"; Robin uses a computer in WayneTech to get to the nano-bugs (presumably making them absorb the virus somehow) but he repeatedly hopes for it to be connected to the mainframe. Dr. Roquette also sends the virus she created to Robin using the internet, using the internet cafe computer she was using to do it. Also played straight with her ability to use the internet to find the nano-bugs she created.
  • Everything's Better with Monkeys:
    • The robot minions in "Schooled", called M.O.N.Q.I.s. This began a Running Gag of Superboy explaining that he hates monkeys.
      Professor Ivo: You have no idea how hard it was coming up with an acronym for "monkey"...
    • Beast Boy likes transforming into monkeys and gorillas, and his default form looks like a human-monkey hybrid.
  • Everything's Better with Rainbows: Lampshaded in "Denial" when Nabu blocks Klarion's attack with a rainbow shield.
    Klarion: Ooh, rainbow power.
  • Everything's Better with Princesses: Well, technically it's Queen Perdita, but given her age, it fits.
  • Even Bad Men Love Their Mamas: In "Disordered" one of the thugs immediately places himself protectively in front of his mothernote  when he thinks they're under attack.
  • Even Evil Has Standards: Despero came to Earth to challenge its greatest warriors to gladiatorial combat and uses his Third Eye only to ensure a fair fight by disabling Zatara (magic is cheating) and Billy Batson (who was 15). His servant L-Ron gets increasingly annoyed as the fight goes on because no one will fight Despero one on one.
    L-Ron: Do you Earthlings truly have no concept of honorable single combat?! Do not follow Earth females! Do not interfere! It is poor sport–ism!
  • Evil Cannot Comprehend Good:
    • Lex Luthor doesn't seem to get why the Runaways would be mad at him for using them as decoys, since he fulfilled his promise to them. He looks befuddled right up until Asami destroys the laptop and the Fatherbox.
    • Everyone on Rimbor, from the audience to the Tribunal itself, cannot understand why the Justice League members on trial are actually trying to prove their innocence to the Tribunal instead of just offering them a bribe for a favorable verdict. Superboy and Miss Martian, at least, get the hint and manage to bribe them in a roundabout fashion once they've properly exonerated the six.
  • Evil Is One Big Happy Family: It's more "Evil Is One Big Loyal Conspiracy With A Common Goal." Nearly every major villain in the entire series is either a member of The Light or an agent of The Light. Some might be out of the loop, but generally they are all in alliance with one another to some extent. Even some of the villains who don't like each other (Sportsmaster and Cheshire; Icicle, Sr. and the Riddler) often turn out to be allies through their connections to The Light. As this is a series where even The Joker and Lex Luthor are team players, it seems that The Light has managed to convince every supervillain on Earth to work together for their mutual benefit. Particularly notable that every single member is loyal enough that nobody has confessed any knowledge of The Light to an outside authority or otherwise betrayed The Light to any major degree. However later in the series many of the villains (especially Sportsmaster and the Reach) have their own goals and are plotting against (if not outright trying to kill) each other.
  • Evil vs. Evil: Bane's forces vs. the Cult of Kobra.
  • Exact Words: The Sword of Beowulf only works for the pure of heart. Unfortunately, purity on either moral extreme counts.
  • Exposed Extraterrestrials: The Kroloteans. Their leader wears a sash, but that's it.
  • Expository Hairstyle: M'gann's shorter hairstyle is the first visual cue to the Time Skip between seasons one and two.
  • Expressive Mask: About half of everyone who wears a mask, though the show makes an effort to keep it more subtle than this trope has been in the past.
  • Expy: Black Spider in episode 6 bears a remarkable similarity to Spider-Man, mostly in the powerset. When he reappears in episode 23 he's even voiced by Josh Keaton.
    • Point of fact, in episode 23 he not only has the same voice, he also moves exactly like Spider-Man (down to the signature poses hanging upside from a web and clinging to the side of a building), his web-shooters make the exact same noise, and he makes suitably groan-worthy puns. Of course, Greg Weisman (Young Justice producer) also worked on The Spectacular Spider-Man. (This may also explain why there were a couple of mooks in Episode 4 who bore an uncanny resemblance to Jackal and Hyena, two antagonists from another Weisman show, Gargoyles.)
  • Extranormal Prison: Featured Belle Reve as a sort of prison for supervillains, where the inmates wear collars that inhibit their powers. The compound itself has extremely tight security, including walls not even Superman himself could break through.
  • Extraverted Nerd: The Riddler/Edward Nigma, Mr. "Riddle Me This" himself, discovers in the Prison Episode that he is at the bottom of the Popularity Food Chain. Then again, he doesn't really have to put up with that.
  • Eye Scream: Red Tornado, having been transferred to his "John Smith" body, gets the skin around his right eye blown off by Black Canary's Canary Cry.

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