YMMV / Uncanny Avengers

  • Arc Fatigue: The Apocalypse Twins/Kang storyline started in issue #6 (with a prelude in #5) and ends in issue #21, for a total of 16 or 17 parts depending on how you count.
  • Ass Pull: Jarnbjorn. Seriously, so out of the blue Thor is able to enchant a weapon to easily kill Celestials? Keep in mind, these are the same beings that his far more powerful father with several thousand years of preparation, an armour that increased his strength even more and the power of his whole Pantheon backing him up couldn't endanger more than a helpless child. Especially jarring is that it can one-shot Celestials, but only injure Apocalypse. It is, however, implied Kang messed with it with his far-future technology somehow in the time between the latter and former incidents.
  • Broken Base:
    • Fans are split over whether Wanda is a Karma Houdini for her role in the original depowering of mutants. Not helped by the fact that the comics have offered several different explanations of why it happened in the first place. It's also not helped by the fact that In-Universe and out, Cyclops is currently being condemned a terrorist for actions which are both considerably minor in comparison though at least similar, and are actually directly the result of her depowering mutants. Considering Wanda herself has criticized Scott for what he did and gets treated as a woobie any time anyone tries to call her out on her actions, MANY are finding it a massive Double Standard.
    • Rogue and Wanda's apparent deaths have left a bad taste in many a reader's mouth. It does not help that they were the only mutant women on the team.
    • The bait-and-switch concerning Spider-Man in Volume 3. Spider-Man quits the team halfway through issue #1 and this pissed off quite a few fans due to how heavily prominent he was on all the cover promoting the series. Others were happy this meant that Spider-Man wouldn't steal the spotlight from less prominent heroes.
  • Complete Monster: The Red Skull. As if stealing Xavier's brain wasn't bad enough, he plans to cause the mutant equivalent of the Holocaust with it and become the Red Onslaught so he can rule the Earth as he fancies.
    • The Ultron/Hank Pym Hybrid. In issue #12, Doctor Voodoo takes the hybrid to The Swamps of Ogun, where he can witness all the souls Ultron has killed, as a way to keep him occupied while they try to plunge Ultron/Pym into the Sun, only for dead bodies of numerous alien species to appear in the swamp, leaving Jericho traumatized. It turns out that Ultron/Pym had committed intergalactic genocide, wiping out numerous alien species, leaving them at near extinction, all the while blaming Earth for the attacks, knowing that the survivors are going to attack the planet. The Hybrid also breaking Quicksilver's leg in issue #11 doesn't help either. Also counts as a Tearjerker, with the Unity Squad believing that there is nothing left of Hank Pym inside the fused monstrosity.
  • I Am Not Shazam: The team isn't actually called the Uncanny Avengers. The actual name is the Avengers Unity Squad, while the title of the book is just a callback to the long-running Uncanny X-Men series. Actual Marvel writers don't even know this it seems, as the teams are called the Uncanny Avengers numerous times in other series.
  • Informed Wrongness: Magneto is lambasted for trying to kill the Red Skull. As in a clone of the unrepentant Nazi war-criminal and mass-murdering bastard, the Red Skull. Never mind that Magneto was just tortured by one of his flunkies, or that the Skull violated his best friend's corpse, or that he's set up all-new concentration camps, apparently killing him is a no-no (well, to be fair, it turns out that killing him was a bad idea after all, because doing so releases Onslaught again, but Magneto had no way of knowing that).
  • Like You Would Really Do It: Issue 14 features no less than three main cast members apparently meeting grisly ends. The fact that one of them will be in an upcoming movie, another appears on the cover of an issue three months later, and the involvement of Kang and other time travelers leave the fandom doubtful any of them will stick.
    • Taken Up to Eleven in issue 17, where the death of Captain America is immediately followed by the destruction of Earth and all its inhabitants. Yeah, that's going to be permanent.
  • Magnificent Bastard: Kang, who manipulated his adopted Apocalypse Twins, the Avengers Unity Squad, and a bunch of people from different time periods in his quest to gain omnipotence.
  • Narm Charm / Crazy Awesome: Severe YMMV here, but the Red Skull's "use the brain of Professor X as a WMD" plan in the first arc of Remender's run. It's over the top and ridiculous and totally in-character for the Skull.
  • Memetic Mutation: With Charles Xavier's brain The Red Skull will eliminate mutant menace!
  • Never Live It Down: It may seem as if everything that Wanda did in the past was depowering mutants.
    • The book itself arguably became better known for Remender's controversial comments about civil rights (see below) than its actual content. Its probably telling that when the book launched Marvel marketed it as the lynchpin of their entire universe and the bridge between its two biggest franchise, but after the controversy, it became just one book among many.
  • Surprisingly Improved Sequel: The first two volumes were marked by controversy and a short run. The third run by Gerry Duggan has been much better received, especially by X-Men fans.
  • Squick:
    • Red Skull holding up Xavier's brain.
    • Speaking of brains, what The Sentry does at one point to restrain Wasp, after an attack badly damaged his body. Ew. Thank you very much, Thor.
    • Avalanche's brain surgery
  • Only the Author Can Save Them Now: Assuming the series will have any sort of ramifications on Earth-616 now that Earth was destroyed in Issue #17 and doesn't take place in an alternate universe, the Apocalypse Twins arc has to be retconned if its going to be consistent with the other ongoing series taking place in the same universe.
  • Rescued from the Scrappy Heap: The Sentry's reappearance in the Apocalypse Twins arc as one of the Twins' Horseman of Death was well-received on the grounds that a) it made him look pretty cool, b) the Void was nowhere to be seen, having supposedly got bored with the constant resurrection-destruction he underwent in the sun, c) his insanity was now less 'destroy all the things!' more 'I am the heir to Apocalypse and I will protect Earth' and it stayed intact at the end of the arc.
  • Take That, Scrappy!: How many people, especially X-Fans, reacted to Wanda's brutal death.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Character: Whoa, Hank Pym and Ultron merged into one being? Gosh, this opens new horizons for Hank as a character now that Scott is Ant-Man again, and we can have a glimpse of Ultron trying to be a hero, as well as the interplay between these t- Ahhh shit he's just gonna be a villain. Because that's totally new and original.
  • Unfortunate Implications: Havok's speech in issue 5 (as written about by Comics Alliance, Newsarama, and Comics Beat) where he denounces the word "mutant" as "divisive" and that "represents everything (he) hates." Particularly difficult considering how mutants have long been written as representative of minorities in real life, creating the image of minorities being told to assimilate and abandon the idea of identity politics if they want to avoid persecution. Remender's intent is to have mutants be treated as every other super-powered individual in the Marvel universe, but the wording of the speech makes it very YMMV. NOT helped by Remender telling complainers to 'drown in hobo piss' afterwards. In addition, compare Havok to a Morlock and you'll see that it doesn't fly on the assimilation routine. He can pass as a handsome blond-haired blue-eyed white male if he takes off the costume, not to mention he's trying to speak as the leader of mutants or a figurehead, which he's not considering the Unity Squad itself is a poor representation of said Unity when you remember that mutants have been helping the Avengers for a long time and it hasn't swayed opinions. Doesn't help that Brian Bendis was quick to give it a Take That! over in All-New X-Men, where Kitty essentially calls Havok a dumbass.
    • Havok having half his face burned off by Kang recently and now terrifying ordinary people might be a way of having any talk of "assimilating" be put to rest.
  • WTH, Costuming Department?:
    • The Scarlet Witch, who used to be the Avengers Ms. Fanservice (see here), now uses just an all-dark red suit (see here). Justified somewhat by her now being far more reclusive thanks to guilt from what she did to the mutants and others making her more wallflowerish, and as such unwilling to show off her body so openly. Perhaps due to its unpopularity, the new costume was done away with after AXIS.
    • Apparently it runs in the family as Quicksilver also suffered this. When he joined the team, he got a new look which was generally accepted as pretty cool. However, the post-Secret Wars sought to cash in on his Age of Ultron appearance by converting his Civvie Spandex into more traditional superhero wear. The end result is what looks like jogging gear with a really bad logo tacked on (think the fast forward emblem on a DVD player).
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