troperville

tools

toys

Wiki Headlines
We've switched servers and will be updating the old code over the next couple months, meaning that several things might break. Please report issues here.

main index

Narrative

Genre

Media

Topical Tropes

Other Categories

TV Tropes Org
random
YMMV: TRON: Uprising
  • Alternative Character Interpretation: The show has very complex characters all working at cross-purposes to each other, even when they're on the same side. None of them are cut and dried.
    • Beck seems the most obviously heroic character and he does seem to be a good person, but his Technical Pacifist stance can come off as unrealistic considering he's being groomed to lead an armed rebellion against Clu. Does he really believe the lives of every program is important enough to save, or is he worried that he may become as bad as Tesler and Clu if he allows himself to take a life?
    • Paige: loyal second-in-command whose traumatic past causes her to turn a blind eye toward Tesler's viciousness and instability because she believes his way is the only way to save the Grid, or a seriously deluded young woman who only serves a man she knows to be a horrible person who doesn't care about his underlings like he does for her and doesn't see the flaws in his "rescue" of her from the Isos? Was she really trying to kill the Renegade all those times or was she holding back because she subconsciously recognizes he's the only one protecting the programs Of Argon from Tesler and Pavel's excesses? Or maybe she realized that Beck was the Renegade and just couldn't bring herself to kill him, either for personal reasons or because she believed she could convince him to support the occupation, as he would be more useful joining willingly than as a rectified drone.
    • Tesler: just what is his motivations? He's definitely brutal and power-hungry, yet he cares for Paige in a way that he doesn't seem to care about anyone else. Other than her fighting skills there doesn't seem to be anything else about her and there's more of a father-daughter dynamic than anything romantic. Is he serving Clu out of My Country, Right or Wrong? Is he a Well-Intentioned Extremist who believes Clu is doing the right thing? Is he trying to amass a power base for himself, independent of Clu?
    • Cyrus: just why did he go from saving Tron's life to wanting to destroy the whole Grid? Again, there's so little revealed about him it's only possible to speculate. Did the Tron Lines on his body have something to do with it?
    • Lomox, is he The Brute with a touch of Genius Bruiser, or a Slave Mook to Gorn who had his programming messed with similar to what Pavel did to Gorn.
  • Awesome Art: Seriously, the designs that go into the setpieces are amazing. There are numerous intricately detailed holograms that line buildings that are in themselves rendered in incredible detail. And while the tone and coloring of TRON: Legacy was on the darker side, Uprising occasionally breaks things up with beautiful arrangements of color in the holograms or building exteriors.
    • Design Student's Orgasm: It doesn't come off as too overt, though, given that the setting is normally cluttered with bright lights and visuals. The artists just went the extra mile to make each of those lights/visuals pretty.
  • Awesome Music: And How!
  • Cult Classic: Even moreso than the two TRON films. Thanks to poor advertising, extended hiatuses, and a short run, as well as Disney XD's status as a cable channel, not many people have seen the show. However, the reception among those who have watched it is almost unanimously positive.
  • Foe Yay: Paige isn't too subtle about this with Beck.
    • Heck, in the intro to "Isolated", it's outright stated that she's infatuated with him. But then again, the Grid voice is a Deadpan Snarker.
    • Beck (as himself) spends half of "Welcome Home" flirting with Paige. It started as a distraction, but he keeps doing it even when he doesn't need to.
    • Beck and Cyrus anyone?
  • Iron Woobie: Beck and Tron really have their moments.
  • Moral Event Horizon: Tesler's more extreme Kick the Dog moments can come off as this. One of the earliest is attacking and massacring a hospital because an ISO had visited it. If he didn't cross it before, then he did when he murdered Keller after she returned to the Occupation of her own free will.
    • Pavel went from a noticeable lieutenant who was a major prick to an incredibly dangerous villain during the events of "Rendezvous", where he used the upgrade disc to casually murder several programs, staged an elaborate frame-up of Paige to keep her from ratting him out, tried to kill her, then finally blamed it all on the Renegade while having his accomplishes silenced.
  • Narm Charm: Beck's early mannerisms are reminiscent of the 80s idealistic and na´ve heroic mindset which is out of place in the cyberpunk atmosphere, especially in contrast to Tron's gruff demeanor. However, it's quite endearing and reminds the viewer that Beck is still young and not plagued with cynicism.
  • Uncanny Valley: Because of the very stylized graphics, some of the program's faces and hairstyles are really weird and/or ugly. It's usually in the form of a somewhat normal looking face with a huge block Cleopatra Nose or some other exaggerated feature that tends to look like a deformity. Beck, Tron, and arguably Tessler's faces are some of the few that aren't really weird and unattractive.
    • It's also gets weird when Flynn and Clu are shown unmasked, and their faces are lined realistically. Because of the cel-shading, they still look like they are line drawings or caricatures. In a nice bit of subtlety, Flynn emotes realistically and his features move in a way that is almost natural. Contrasting him is Clu, whose face is completely rigid, and the age lines and beady black eyes make him look almost demonic.
    • The Tron Lines on Cyrus' face look... unsettling.
  • Visual Effects of Awesome: The show blends the styles of hand-drawn and cel-shaded computer generated art really well. Static images and backgrounds sometimes look as if they were hand-painted, and the action and fight scenes are much more fluid and intricate than most CGI productions. Only the faces and some of the moving vehicles give away the 3D feel.
  • What an Idiot: Beck taking off his helmet when he's supposed to have a secret identity, because it is uncomfortable. Lampshaded by Tron; when Beck does it in a simulation, he's recognized and distracted with mention of Bohdi's death, then Derrezed. After that, Beck keeps his mask on when on duty, all the time.
  • What Do You Mean, It's for Kids?: It's frankly amazing the kind of gore this show can get away with because its characters aren't human. Characters are routinely killed, have holes punched in them, etc. "The Reward" went so far as to have a still-living guard who was bisected at the waist crawling along the ground, bleeding the whole way, until he gets stepped on and completely derezzed.
    • Many of the deaths involve bisection, severe impalement, getting gibbed, or getting chunks ripped out of them, and you can be sure that all of this is shown on screen. Torture is pretty vicious, too, involving bits of the program getting vaporized out. At one point, Beck is being boiled alive while strapped to a chair. The show gets away with this because, being programs, there's no flesh or blood, merely featureless bluish cubes.

random
TV Tropes by TV Tropes Foundation, LLC is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available from thestaff@tvtropes.org.
Privacy Policy
13155
35