troperville

tools

toys


main index

Narrative

Genre

Media

Topical Tropes

Other Categories

TV Tropes Org
random
YMMV: The Swan Princess
  • All Animation Is Disney: Then again, Richard Rich did direct the Disney films The Black Cauldron and The Fox and the Hound, and the movie draws heavily on the "Disney Renaissance" style.
  • Alternative Character Interpretation: If not for their direct interaction with Derek, one could easily assume that the odd personalities of the animals were all in Odette's head, a coping mechanism for dealing with the loss of her father, lover, and home...
  • Angst? What Angst?: Odette is never seen grieving over her dead father. And no one seems to have any problem in the third movie with Odette being resurrected with necromantic black magic.
    • Alternatively, the second example is simply Derek's reward for destroying the Forbidden Arts, which wouldn't be a reason for angsting.
    • Well, she does do a lot of breaking down in the first movie, which can be assumed to be about the whole gravity of the immense situation she's in, from the death of her father to being cursed.
    • Also, there's no real mention of how much time has passed. Uberta says, "Thinking of her and the way that it was", so possibly a couple of months or even a year could have passed. Maybe, Odette had already mourned and now was focused on escape.
  • Big Lipped Alligator Moment: Rogers' "She's Gone!" musical number in the third movie.
  • Contested Sequel: The second and third films. On the one hand, they're direct-to-video and feature almost none of the original voice cast (save for Odette and Puffin). But on the other, the plots are at least more original and interesting than many of the Disney DTV sequels. The second devotes a lot of screen time to the entertaining Queen Uberta, while the third features a very charismatic villain and has a surprisingly dark climax. Plus the animation is still pretty consistent across all three films.
  • Ensemble Dark Horse: Rogers, Speed, Jean-Bob, the old woman, Wesley and Puffin
  • "Funny Aneurysm" Moment: During the opening song, Derek takes out his frustration over the forced betrothal by shooting arrows at a Gonk picture of Odette that he drew. This becomes less amusing after Derek mistakes Odette in her swan form for the Great Animal, and very nearly shoots her for real.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight: One of Odette's Talking Animal friends is Jean-Bob, a French-accented frog who wants a princess to kiss him so he can turn into a prince.
    • For that matter, John Cleese voiced Jean-Bob in the first film. 10 years later, he voiced King Harold, an actual frog prince, in the Shrek sequels.
    • In the third movie, Odette is ressurected by Black Magic. Come in Bayonetta, and Odette from Swan Lake is reinterpreted as a witch that made a demonic pact...
  • Idiot Plot: If King William had executed Rothbart instead of just letting him go, and Derek hadn't been completely unable to express his feelings in a coherent manner, the first movie would have been over in twelve minutes. The sequels, too, since Rothbart would never have created the orb or the notes that allowed Clavius and Zelda to become serious threats.
  • Magnificent Bastard: For all that he's a Large Ham, Rothbart is one of the most terrifying and competent villains in animation. He nearly succeeds, and he looks good doing it.
  • Memetic Mutation: Derek should write a book: How to offend women in five syllables or less.
  • Narm: Here and there, if you're taking the movie too seriously. See Skyward Scream, though.
    • The universe repeatedly contriving to turn Odette into a swan again gets more and more absurd as the sequels go on.
  • Painful Rhyme: From "No More Mr. Nice Guy": "Up 'til now I've pulled my punches/I intend to eat their lunches…"
    • Oh come on, that's not nearly as painful as "As soon as my witchcraft has zinged 'em/I'll gain control of the kingdom!"
    • "No More Mr. Nice Guy", catchy as it is, has a lot of these: "Odette won't go to the ball cause I won't bring her / So I'll conjure a date who's a real dead ringer."
      • "As for Odette, well that's tragic/ 'Cause I'm goin' back to that old black magic!"
    • Also cringe-worthy is the line "What if Odette doesn't go for the merger?/Urge her!" from "This Is My Idea".
    • "This plan if applied'll/Be simply suicidal!" from "No Fear".
    • Also a case of Rhyming with Itself:
    Odette: I haven't packed or washed my hair and Father I get seasick!
    [a few lines later]
    Derek: If you make me kiss her hand again, I swear I'm gonna be sick!"
  • Sequelitis: The sequels suffer from this.
  • Tainted by the Preview: If the timing of The Swan Princess Christmas (14 years after the end of the trilogy and two years after the death of Odette's original speaking voice) didn't already make it seem bad enough, the trailer's cheap animation and writing quality cinch it.
  • Tastes Like Diabetes: Each movie ends with Derek and/or Odette saying something sappy, then kissing in closeup (through Stock Footage, no less). From the third movie:
    Odette: Promise me, Derek. There's no more magic in the castle?
    Derek: I can't do that. So long as you're here, Odette, there will always be magic.
  • Ugly Cute: Odette, during her preteen "ugly duckling" years. She had Girlish Pigtails, Youthful Freckles, dressed and acted like a Tomboy...but also had large, deep blue eyes, a beautiful voice, and more often than not seemed to be sad.
  • Uncanny Valley: The fourth film, entirely made in CGI, is full of examples.
  • What an Idiot: The first film would be shorter if the lovers didn't each hold the Idiot Ball. Odette, in her swan form, has to steal a map from inside Rothbart's castle to tell where she is when she could just fly and get an idea that way. And Derek falls for an Odette dupe who is dressed in black. (In the ballet version of this story, this is justified as the lovers have only just met, but here they've known each other for years and she usually wears white.) In the third film, he falls for an Odette dupe again. It's even lampshaded by Zelda.
    • Though Odette does justify wanting the map as wanting to make sure that she knows where she's going and how to get back - it's only by being at the lake that she can turn back into a human.
      • Also, we were never given any indication that Odette was familiar with where Rothbart had taken her. Remember, she was in Derek's kingdom with her father when Rothbart had attacked. She's spent most of her summers visiting Derek but that doesn't mean she'd know every square inch of the land.
    • It's been observed that while Derek isn't a total moron, he's not exactly the most quick witted individual. He did note that the Odette impostor seemed a little different than how Odette usually is, but Bridget's acting and composure as Odette was near flawless. Besides, she was probably pandering to Derek's ego by the way she was hanging on his shoulder and smiling vapidly as he was making his vow. Derek was too in the moment to really notice the change because it seemed too good to be true.
    • In the third film while Wizzer has Zelda distracted, Derek apparently thinks it's a good idea to shout her name and then attack her as opposed to snatching the wand away and breaking it while she was distracted.

random
TV Tropes by TV Tropes Foundation, LLC is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available from thestaff@tvtropes.org.
Privacy Policy
15336
23