YMMV: The Legend of Drizzt

  • Adaptation Displacement: More people follow the Drizzt novels than the Forgotten Realms, though there is a considerable overlap.
  • Big Lipped Alligator Moment: The Spine of the World is as much the story of a village girl's unwanted pregnancy and Arranged Marriage as anything else.
  • Boring Invincible Hero: Drizzt sometimes comes off as this due to the fact he almost never loses, even against the equivalent of Balrogs. The fact Drizzt is unable to defeat most of his problems (like Fantastic Racism) by simply using his scimitars, though, keeps the books interesting.
  • Complete Monster: Matron Yvonnel Baenre and Vendes Baenre; Herzgo Alegni.
  • Crosses the Line Twice: The Drow would be a highly offensive Straw Feminist Lady Land if not for the fact it's such an incredibly over-the-top society that both male and female fans love it.
  • Ensemble Darkhorse: Drizzt is this, himself, since the books were originally supposed to center around Wulfgar.
  • Evil Is Sexy: RA Salvatore helped solidify Drow women as sexy evil.
  • Fan-Preferred Couple: Drizzt and Alustriel. The reason they never hooked up is probably because the latter is a major character of the Forgotten Realms canon and not a creation of R.A. Salvatore.
  • Fountain of Expies: Not in fiction, per say, but Drizzt is infamous for being copied by players hoping to imitate his success.
  • Growing the Beard / Seasonal Rot: With a series this long, it's almost inevitable. When this happens depends on the reader, of course.
    • For some, the Dark Elf Trilogy (i.e., the prequels to the first novels), showing more of dark elf society and giving a real look inside Drizzt's head with the first essays, were Growing the Beard. For others, the loss of the more devil-may-care attitude from the Icewind Dale Trilogy in favor of what they saw as Wangst was early-onset Seasonal Rot.
    • Legacy of the Drow seemed to be more of a downer than the other books, featuring the first death of a Companion, a lot of tension between the characters and years-long separations, while at the same time putting characters in holding patterns for long stretches (for example, Catti-Brie and Drizzt, the resolution of which wouldn't even occur until the end of the trilogy after the next one). But the characters seemed to behave with more maturity, and the implications of some relationships were explored in-depth.
    • Paths of Darkness continues the trend of dealing with darker and more mature topics in a more ambiguous fashion, allowing yet more arguments from people who prefer different spots on the Sliding Scale of Idealism vs. Cynicism...
    • And so on down the line.
  • Strangled by the Red String: Cattie Brie and Drizzt struck many fans as this due to the fact the latter had known her since she was a child. Quite a few thought she was closer to being Drizzt's DAUGHTER rather than lover.
  • Word of God: Ed Greenwood has mentioned Artemis and Drizzt are two of the Realm's top ten swordsmen despite their relatively modest (By Realm's standards) levels.