!!The comics:
* BaseBreaker: Orlando is this. To some readers, he/she is a BloodKnight who is LivingForeverIsAwesome personified. To other's he/she's a CreatorsPet and a one-note CampGay.
* BrokenBase:
** The ''Century'' trilogy is very divisive amongst readers, with some hailing it for its more experimental qualities, well-done characterization, and the many [[SugarWiki/MomentOfAwesome Awesome Moments]] that occur. Others slam due it due to Moore's [[NostalgiaFilter attitude towards everything after 1969]], [[NewMediaAreEvil thematic antiquarianism in a series that had once critiqued that kind of thinking]], [[CreatorsPet Orlando, a two-note character who seemingly exists only to provide]] AuthorAppeal and his [[ShallowParody mean-spirited]] treatment of [[Franchise/JamesBond modern]] [[Franchise/HarryPotter characters]] for being modern.
** There's the question of whether Moore's ''really'' TruerToTheText than most other adaptations, or whether he's really just [[DarkerAndEdgier pushing for the darkest possible depiction]] [[AuthorAppeal for his private enjoyment]]. Particular sore spots include: Mina Murray being a divorced woman when she was HappilyMarried to Jonathan Harker in the original novel, [[spoiler: Hyde raping the Invisible Man, James Bond as an incompetent misogynist traitor, and Harry Potter as a whiny, self-pitying school shooter strung out on anti-depressants]].
* CompleteMonster: Hawley Griffin, aka Literature/TheInvisibleMan, is a psychopath recruited by England so his powers could be utilized for special missions. Introduced hiding in an all-girls boarding school, Griffin's been taking advantage of his powers to rape the teenagers there. He's already impregnated three girls and is apprehended in the process of raping a fourth. When he joins the league, it's not out of any sense of altruism but because he's been promised a cure for his condition, a pardon for his crimes, and a large sum of money. During his tenure on the team, Griffin displays streaks of cruelty and cowardice in equal measure. At one point he beats an innocent constable to death simply because he wanted the man's clothes, and at the climax of the team's first adventure, [[DirtyCoward Griffin attempts to abandon the league to their deaths when things get too dangerous.]] With the arrival of the invading Martians, [[LesCollaborateurs Griffin eagerly approaches them and sells out his entire planet to the invaders just so he can rule alongside them.]] Griffin gives the Martians information on where the human artillery positions are so they can slaughter their opposition, tries to get his teammates killed by selling out their hideout's location, [[NoHoldsBarredBeatdown brutalizes Mina Murray]] while stealing valuable military information, and advises the Martians to use their Red Weed to destroy the Thames and incapacitate the [[CoolBoat Nautilus]]. In a series where [[BlackAndGrayMorality even monsters can be heroes]], Griffin was never anything but a [[ItsAllAboutMe selfish, megalomaniacal snake]] who was willing to let his race be butchered and enslaved just so he could rule over what was left.
%%Do not add anyone else without going to the cleanup thread first.
* CrackPairing: Since the series deals with the relationships between various fictional characters, this happens quite a bit. Most visibly with Quartermain and Murray, but it happens with minor characters as well. Frankenstein's monster and his wife Olympia from Tales of Hoffman come to mind.
* CreatorProvincialism: A frequent criticism of the later volumes. For a series that's ostensibly a tribute to the history of fiction, it can strike some readers as a bit strange that most of the coded references in ''2009'' are to British pop culture, in spite of the growing influence of American and Japanese pop culture in the 21st century.
* CreatorsPet: Orlando is regarded as some as this in the ''Century'' trilogy. Worth noting though the character is a BaseBreaker who divides opinion.
* EvilIsSexy: Ayesha, Queen of Kor and the main antagonist of the ''Nemo'' spinoff.
* GeniusBonus: Pretty much every damn page.
* HePannedItNowHeSucks: A big part of the reaction towards ''[[BaseBreaker Century: 2009]]'' comes from the fact that it boils down to a mean-spirited hatchet-job directed at [[spoiler: Harry Potter]]. Whether fans' reactions were just this trope in action, or whether it was legitimately poorly-done and damaged the work from a literary standpoint is up for debate. (And the two aren't necessarily mutually exclusive.)
* HarsherInHindsight: In ''Century: 2009'', Creator/JudiDench's M from the Franchise/JamesBond films, who in this universe is [[Series/TheAvengers Emma Peel]], is made [[spoiler: immortal. A few months later, she was killed off in ''Film/{{Skyfall}}'']].
* HilariousInHindsight
** Moore's GrandFinale for ''Century: 2009'' involves an epic face-off between [[spoiler: Harry Potter and Mary Poppins]]. Just a few months after he wrote that scene (and almost exactly a month after the comic hit the stands) a battle between [[Franchise/HarryPotter Voldemort]] and a swarm of Mary Poppinses turned out to be part of the Opening Ceremony of the 2012 Olympic Games.
** Among many other tidbits, ''Century: 2009'' manages to tie Franchise/JamesBond and ''Series/TheAvengers'' together into one universe with the revelation that Creator/JudiDench's M in the later Bond films is actually an aging Emma Peel. Though we never get to find out M's true identity in the films, ''Film/{{Skyfall}}'' actually did turn out to include a brief moment where Kincade, Bond's old groundskeeper, addresses her as "Emma" (presumably because he misheard "M" as "Em").
** ''Century: 2009'' includes a brief cameo from [[Series/TheThickOfIt "seasoned fixer Malcolm Tucker"]] on a television screen, in the same issue that includes several background cameos from [[Series/DoctorWho The Doctor]]. Fast-forward to 2013: [[Creator/PeterCapaldi Malcolm Tucker]] is now the Twelfth Doctor.
** A 2005 episode of ''Series/{{Extras}}'' featuring Creator/DanielRadcliffe mercilessly hitting on Dame Diana Rigg suddenly became HilariousInHindsight when ''Century: 2009'' featured [[Series/TheAvengers Emma Peel]] leading the fight to take down [[spoiler: a deranged Literature/HarryPotter]]. Maybe she wanted revenge on him [[ItMakesSenseInContext for flinging that condom at her head]]?
** The final scene of the comic [[spoiler:is of Quatermain's grave in Africa, just like the movie.]]
** Similarly, though the movie's "Fantom" (a villain loosely based on Erik from ''Theatre/ThePhantomOfTheOpera'' and Fantomas) the comics ''did'' finally incorporate ''Phantom of the Opera'' into the plot of ''The Black Dossier''. According to one of the supplementary stories, the League had their final face-off with France's "Les Hommes Mystérieux" at the Paris Opera, where they tried to stop their plot to plant explosives in the Phantom's old lair. The other half, Fantomas, being one of the French team members.
** About thirteen years after Creator/AlanMoore made Literature/SherlockHolmes' older brother [[Franchise/JamesBond "M"]] in the first volume of ''League'', [[Creator/JonnyLeeMiller the original M's grandson]] became Sherlock Holmes in ''Series/{{Elementary}}''.
* LesYay: [[spoiler: Mina has no use for Orlando when he's a male.]]
* {{Narm}}: [[spoiler: Allan's]] death. To elaborate: he gets electrocuted by lightning coming from [[spoiler: Harry Potter's]] dick.
* NightmareFuel: The dead bodies fused to the remains of the train in ''Century 2009''.
* NoExportForYou: In Canada, at least, you can't buy ''The Black Dossier'' without online ordering.
* OffscreenMomentOfAwesome: We never get to see the full exploits of the Second League of the Extraordinary Gentlemen, and their very-much-indeed awesome-sounding encounter with Les Hommes Mysterieux is only described in text on the Black Dossier. Also sideway referenced in text are the missions of Prospero's Men, The Third League of the Extraordinary Gentlemen, Der Zwielicht-helden and Les Hommes Mysterieux themselves.
** We also see far too little of the League of the 1780s, featuring Lemuel Gulliver, the Scarlet Pimpernel and wife, the Scarecrow, Fanny Hill, and Natty Bumpo. Most of what we do see when they appear is when they've largely retired from adventuring and are touring the world indulging their more hedonistic tendencies.
* ScheduleSlip: A regular enough occurrence that there's actually a backup strip in the v2 trade about it.
* TearJerker: [[TearJerker/TheLeagueOfExtraordinaryGentlemen Now has a page in need of]] WikiMagic
* TakeThatScrappy: People who disliked [[spoiler: Literature/HarryPotter]] or who liked it but felt it was overrated in esteem and especially found the title character less interesting than the supporting cast enjoyed Moore's takedown of it in Century Vol 3. The same applies for people who enjoyed the trolling of James Bond, even by the character's fans who felt the character was so overexposed they found this revisionist version entertaining.
* TheyWastedAPerfectlyGoodPlot:
** The announcement of the ''Century'' trilogy initially had fans buzzing because they thought they'd finally get to see the original graphic novel's premise applied to 20th century fiction. And they did... except, instead of creating a new team of champions for a new era of fiction, Moore just made the two remaining members of the original FiveManBand immortal, and added ''one'' consistent new member (Orlando) who quickly devolved into a CreatorsPet. By ''2009'', Mina and Allan have mentally aged so much that they barely even resemble their literary counterparts (which kind of kills what made the series fascinating in the first place) leaving behind little more than ultra-obscure background references.
** Once ''Century: 2009'' finally revealed the Moonchild's identity, many fans of [[spoiler: Harry Potter]] objected to the entire storyline not necessarily because of Moore's treatment of the character, but because it wasn't nearly as interesting as it could have been. If Moore had managed to rein in [[AuthorOnBoard his hatred of today's pop culture]], and [[ShallowParody had actually familiarized himself with the character enough to make his portrayal feel authentic]], it ''could'' have been a genuinely fascinating look at youthful rebellion, the paranoia of the post-9/11 world, and [[BecauseDestinySaysSo the conflict between destiny and free will]]. Instead, [[spoiler: Harry]] is just portrayed as a one-note [[TeensAreMonsters foul-mouthed teen with an attitude problem]]. Regardless of how you might feel about the source material, that's hardly the basis for an interesting villain.
*** Others felt that the universe of the book continuing to be doggedly Anglocentric in its depicted references--in spite of the growing influence of American and Japanese pop culture--was also far too provincial in scope.
* ValuesDissonance: The comic deliberately fakes this trope to create aesops such as "ORIENTALS, while BRILLIANT, are EVIL". Which we would like to stress is a verbatim quote.
* WhatDoYouMeanItWasntMadeOnDrugs: The Beatnik novella from the Black Dossier reads like this, which, given the source material, isn't surprising. If one takes the time to actually decipher the text, the plot seems to involve Fu Manchu and Professor Moriarty's descendants ([[Literature/OnTheRoad Dean Moriarty]] and [[Creator/JackKerouac Doctor Sax]], respectively) continuing a family feud by unleashing an ancient Aztec linguistic virus made from centipedes. Oh and the virus actually turns out to be Lovecraftian {{Eldritch Abomination}}s.
* WhatHappenedToTheMouse: The [[AuthorAppeal real]] [[NewMediaAreEvil reason]] is obvious, but from a Watsonian perspective, what happened to almost every major literary character since the middle of the twentieth century?

!!The film:
* BrokenBase: Over ten years old and IMDB still gets a debate several times a year on whether the film tanked for not being like the comic or if that was one of the best decisions it made.
* HilariousInHindsight:
** The movie's EvilPlan involves a mysterious bad guy (who's eventually revealed to be [[spoiler: Professor Moriarty]]) trying to start WorldWarI a few decades early. ''Film/SherlockHolmesAGameOfShadows'', which came out almost a decade later, was about the same thing. [[spoiler: In this film, Moriarty even references the Reichenbach falls as where "that man died." Perhaps he got some plastic surgery, and tried to start his EvilPlan all over again, but went more ambitious by using the League?]]
** Richard Roxburgh would also go on to play Dracula in ''Film/VanHelsing'' a year later, which also featured a Mr. Hyde.
** When [[http://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/rudyard-kiplings-the-jungle-book-1994 reviewing the 1994 live-action film]] ''Film/TheJungleBook'', Roger Ebert talked about the InNameOnly premise and wondered "What's next? ''Tom Sawyer'' with a car chase and a shoot-out?"
** The team of this comic-book film consists of
*** Nemo: A man with an unusual beard, untold riches, and access to advanced technology that no one else can duplicate.
*** Quartermain: A legendary old hero in an era that is not his own, who lost someone close to him while working for his government.
*** Mina: A beautiful red-haired woman with a traumatic past who dresses largely in black and is much more dangerous than she appears.
*** Jekyll: A mild-mannered Doctor who, at times, transforms into his large, super-strength alter ego.
*** [[spoiler:An attack on the heroes' cool transport by the prettyboy bad guy and his inside knowledge, and he's working for an even more dangerous foe.]]
*** And they're all working at the behest of a mysterious government figure. The only ones that don't match are Thor and Hawkeye [[note]]unless you include Quartermain, who is a crack shot, or reformed thief Skinner (assuming MCU Hawkeye shares that part of the comic version's past)[[/note]], but other than that, one almost expects Quartermain to yell "[[Film/TheAvengers League, Assemble!]]"
* RetroactiveRecognition: Shane West (Sawyer) currently plays Michael in ''Series/{{Nikita}}''.
** Somewhat funny, because Peta Wilson (Mina) got her start as the lead on ''Film/LaFemmeNikita'', of which ''Nikita'' is a remake