YMMV / The Hangover

  • Alternative Character Interpretation: Is Alan a Millstone, a Psychopathic Man Child, or is he a Misunderstood Loner with a Heart of Gold?
  • Base Breaker:
    • Leslie Chow is either the most hilarious character or the most annoying character in the trilogy, depending on who you ask. When it comes to the sequels, you can also add people who think he's funny, but not funny enough to warrant the increased screen time in each sequel.
    • Alan is either the funniest character in the series, only funny in small doses or is the most annoying character of the films.
  • Big Lipped Alligator Moment: Stu's "What Do Tigers Dream Of?" musical number.
  • Counterpart Comparison: The Wolfpack and the other supporting characters shares traits with the characters of the cartoon Ed, Edd 'n' Eddy. See Spiritual Successor below for more information.
  • Critical Dissonance: Part II was largely panned by critics, but it was successful at the box office, outgrossing the original (in more than one way). Part III has an even more negative reception than II, but still managed to have the second highest opening weekend for an R-rated comedy film.
  • Crosses the Line Twice: A cop (played by six-and-a-half foot tall Marine, Rob Riggle) kicking in the door, pointing a gun, and screaming "SHUT THAT BABY UP!" - This would only allude to later on, in which he is outright leading kids to hit the three with tasers. The hysterical laughter and goading as it all happens leaves you wondering just how these guys "serve and protect".
  • Crowning Music of Awesome:
    • The soundtrack has an impressive hip-hop collection for a movie that does not specifically revolve around hip-hop.
    • 'What do Tigers dream of when they take a little Tiger snooze?' It's beautiful.
    • The Dan Band's version of Fifty Cent's "Candy Shop".
    • The use of Nine Inch Nails' version of "Hurt" (the original one) for the scene where Alan bids Chow a final (well, unless you count The Stinger) farewell and leaves with the Wolfpack.
  • Ear Worm:
    • "Candy Shop" by The Dan Band.
    • The Flo Rida songs on the end credits too ("Right Round" on the original, "Turn Around" for the sequel).
    • "We're the three best friends that anyone could have, we're the three best friends that anyone could have..."
  • Ensemble Darkhorse:
    • Leslie Chow, hence each sequel giving more screen time & relevance to the film than the previous.
    • The Dan Band has certainly gotten a good many fans from this film. Doubles as a One-Scene Wonder.
  • Esoteric Happy Ending: The second film ends with Stu marrying Lauren and the guys (and Mike Tyson) reacting to the photos of the night before. Oh, what wacky fun! It almost makes you forget that Stu slept with a prostitute and not only is not going to tell Lauren about it, but might well have an STD. Oh, and Teddy's career plans are shot through because he cut off his finger and it's now impossible to reattach it.
  • Fan-Preferred Couple: Many fans were rooting for Jade and Stu to stay together in the end of the first movie and were disappointed to see Stu was married to someone else in the second.
    • To an extent, Chow and Alan's Ho Yay in the sequels led to some fans wishing for them to pair up.
  • First Installment Wins: Most fans agree that the first film was definitely the best.
  • Funny Aneurysm: Not that it was all that hilarious before, but seeing a giraffe get killed becomes even more horrific after the controversy about the euthanised giraffe Marius from the Copenhagen Zoo.
  • Germans Love David Hasselhoff: The character of Leslie Chow is so popular in Japan and China that he has been given more and more screen time with each movie in the franchise.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight: In Part II, Mike Tyson tells Stu that he should have his tattoo removed. Considering the Frivolous Lawsuit over that same tattoo that nearly caused the film's delay, this also doubles as a retroactive "Funny Aneurysm" Moment.
  • It's the Same, Now It Sucks: The main complaint from critics against Part II was that it was just a long Call Back.
    • They Changed It, Now It Sucks: And on the other end of the spectrum, the main complaint from critics against Part III was that it diverged so far from the previous films that it didn't even seem to be a comedy anymore.
  • Moral Event Horizon:
    • Alan drugging the Wolfpack in the first film seems to be just a result of his stupidity, but then comes the sequel where he drugs them again, this time on purpose in order to knock out Teddy, thus cementing his status as a Comedic Sociopath, at least as far as that film's concerned. Made worse by the fact that he not only lies to his friends' faces about doing so, but swears to God. However, the events of the third film convince him to turn his life around. Then The Stinger comes along, the Wolfpack (along with his new wife Cassie) is roofied yet again... and this time, he's not responsible. Guess who he received that wedding cake from?
    • And what caused Alan to sober up? Chow betraying him and his friends and making off with the other half of Marshall's gold. It was such a horrible betrayal, Alan only saved his life so he could personally break off their friendship.
  • Older Than They Think
    • The plot of the first film shares plenty of similarities with Dude, Where's My Car?, the 1999 The Simpsons episode "Viva Ned Flanders", and Very Bad Things.
    • That fake-out hi-five/handshake thing that Zach Galifianakis does in the third film originated in an episode of Comedy Bang! Bang! (to which Scott Aukerman replied, "That's...still a thing?").
  • One-Scene Wonder:
  • Sequelitis: The first one was well-received. The sequels, not so much (the second for retreading the original while adding on Vulgar Humor, and the third for extreme Flanderization while drifting too far from the original to the point that comedy is almost an afterthought).
  • Signature Scene: Mr. Chow jumping out of the trunk, naked, and beating everyone.
    • The Tiger Lullaby.
  • Spiritual Successor:
    • The humor and slapstick gags are very reminiscent of The Three Stooges. In fact, some felt the film and its sequels are better modern adaptations then the actual 2012 film (albeit more grittier, grounded and semi-realistic then actual series of the Stooges' films).
    • The overall film trilogy feels like an R-rated live-action adaptation of the kids' cartoon Ed, Edd 'n' Eddy (which like the films is also distributed by Warner Bros.), due to some characters sharing traits with the cartoon's characters:
      • Phil shares some traits with Eddy, due to them being the egotistical and womanizing Jerkass leads of the trio and further hits home with his actor Bradley Cooper's voice coincidentally sounding like Eddy's voice actor Tony Sampson's voice when voicing the character.
      • Stu acts as the film series' Double D due to them trying to act as the three's Only Sane Man and The Smart Guy even though both are the neurotic of the three and are Not So Above It All.
      • Alan is Ed's counterpart, due to them being The Ditz of the group who can be an Unwitting Instigator of Doom who creates the problem that drives the plot.
      • Leslie Chow, Eddie Palermos from the first film and Samir from the second film (the latter two played by the same actor) all shares traits with Rolf, due to them being the Funny Foreigner towards the trio and are more tolerable and civil towards them in contrast to the other characters until their patience wears thin by the three's antics (though Eddie and Samir can count as exceptions).
      • Tracy and Melissa (from the first film) are each a Decomposite Character of Sarah due to the former being stressed out by the three's antics and being the sister of the trio's The Ditz, while the latter is an ill-tempered Jerkass and her being the girlfriend of Stu alludes to Sarah having a crush on Double D in the cartoon, though Sarah was slightly nicer towards Double D, while still controlling in contrast to Melissa's full-blown poor treatment.
      • Doug shares traits with Jimmy, due to them being each a Nice Guy who most of the time ended up as a Butt Monkey because of the three's mishaps. Doug's marriage to the Tsundere sister of the group's The Ditz parallels to Jimmy's close relationship to Ed's sister Sarah.
      • Jade is the films' version of the cartoon's Nazz, due to them being beautiful Nice Girls with Hair of Gold, Heart of Gold.
      • Rob Riggle's character Officer Franklin from the first film shares traits with Kevin, due to them being Jerkasses who invoke Disproportionate Retribution against the three for harming or stealing their vehicles (Franklin arrests the Wolfpack then have them being taser test dummies for robbing his police cruiser, while Kevin is protective of his prized bike and would harm anyone who damages or steal it). In addition, Franklin's occupation as a police officer, who is usually seen as a figure who should be respected, is similar to Kevin's position as The Ace in the neighborhood, while both can still act as a Jerkass towards the three idiots.
      • Melissa McCarthy's character Cassie who is smitten with Alan in the third film can be seen as an Adaptational Heroism Composite Character of the Kanker Sisters, due to them being low class females in terms of appearances and manners who are smitten with all or one of the three idiots, like May Kanker's infatuation with Ed (Alan Garner's cartoon counterpart). However, while the Kankers are outright obnoxious, Cassie, however while still a jerk, is less worse.
      • Black Doug shares traits with Jonny 2x4, both are African American Nice Guys (though it's never specified that Jonny was African American and more bordered on Ambiguously Brown) who can be friendly towards the three morons and acts as the Butt Monkeys as well. Black Doug being The Dragon for Marshall in the Grand Finale is similar to Jonny's Face–Heel Turn into becoming the costumed villain The Gourd in The Stinger to the cartoon's own Grand Finale.
      • Marshall himself is the trilogy's counterpart of Eddy's Brother, due to both of them being the Bigger Bads of both series as the trios' problems are traced back to them. Even though both can be Laughably Evil (especially when you have John Goodman playing the villain, who is mostly The Comically Serious), they are treated as each a Knight of Cerebus as their appearances are mostly played out seriously.
    • Interestingly, The Three Stooges is said to be one of the inspirations for Ed, Edd n Eddy. So it comes full circle.
  • Squick:
    • While the credits is one big Crowning Moment of Funny as a whole, there are a couple of pictures that'll make viewers want to vomit.
    • Another example are the transsexuals in Part II.
    • Another would be Stu getting breast enlargements at The Stinger for Part III.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Character:
    • It's not uncommon to find people who complain that, after being a living MacGuffin in the first film, Doug is wasted as a character in the sequels by leaving him out of the drunken night in Part II & restoring him to his original role in Part III. Especially since his actor, Justin Bartha, has shown he can easily play a quirky companion in the National Treasure films.
    • A lot of people are also unhappy about Heather Graham's character Jade being left out of Part II, since she and Stu seemed to actually go together well in their final scene, and because she's perhaps the only sympathetic and rounded female character.
      • Though she does turn up again in part III.
  • What an Idiot: Part II was sued for copyright infringement over a tattoo. This is the third time in several years this (a copyright infringement suit, this being the first suit anyone has filed on anyone else over a tattoo) has happened to Warner. They settled in June.
  • The Woobie: Alan is this at some points. Especially when he starts singing "We're the three best friends that anyone could have!"
    • Even more so when he's genuinely distressed at the idea that Doug might be dead, while the other two don't seem to have considered the possibility.
      • Stu certainly considered the possibility:
    Our best friend Doug is probably lying facedown in a ditch right now with a methhead buttfucking his corpse!!
    • Alan's Woobie status drops dramatically when you consider that nearly every bad thing that happens to the Wolfpack is his fault. Mainly because he drugs them in both films. Then comes the third, where his sympathy drops further as he's becoming too weird to function.
    • Stu is another Woobie. In the first film, his girlfriend controls his life with an iron fist and he not only lacks the guts to stand up for himself (until the end), but actually makes excuses for her abusing and cheating on him. In the second film, his disapproving father-in-law emasculates him in a similar fashion. And to top it all off, Alan's stupidity results in Stu being put through hell in both films and nearly having his marriage destroyed in the second.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/YMMV/TheHangover