YMMV: The Elder Scrolls Online

  • Anti-Climax Boss: Molag Bal is incredibly easy to defeat if you have a health-draining ability thanks to the fact that the Blessing of Akatosh makes them restore ridiculously large amounts of health.
  • Awesome Music:
  • Broken Base:
    • The fact that the game has a $15 monthly fee did NOT sit well with the fans.
    • And that's on top of having microtransactions. Bethesda, to its credit, is at least trying to lobby Microsoft to waive the necessity for Xbox Live (which also requires a subscription) to play Elder Scrolls Online on the Xbox One, so that players don't essentially have to pay two subscriptions for the same game.
      • The April 4th, 2014 launch only threw more fuel on the fire. After the early game access period ended, players were forced to set up a subscription right away before being able to access their free thirty days. While this is normal and rather par for the course for subscription-based MMORPG's, what wasn't normal was the fact that the full price for the subscription was immediately charged as a pre-authorization, essentially locking out players who were either in a tough spot financially, or who were planning on using prepaid game time cards as their preferred method of payment. Players immediately suspected Executive Meddling, and the bad press is already starting to take its toll, with Zenimax trying to run damage control in the 60+ pages-long thread in the official forums full of angry players.
    • If you're on a video, don't comment as to which faction you'll be. You'll get hefty praise and criticism alike, from fellow faction members and rival faction members respectively.
    • Depending on who you ask, the Phasing System is either the most immersive thing to ever grace an MMORPG, or its an unnecessary barrier with a complete lack of any kind of way to go back to previous phases, barring you from being able to help friends complete quests that you previously completed.
    • The artstyle of the game is also not getting any songs of praises from a lot of the fans either, due to replacing the relatively realistic artstyle of the main series with a much more exaggerated style of traditional mainstream fantasy games. Slightly justified for being a MMO and not being able to process detailed graphics, but on the other hand other MMOs have opted for semi-realism and worked out fine.
    • Imperials being unavailable as a race. It's been justified by the historical context of Tamriel, but a few are still annoyed.
    • The Arrival Trailer subjecting the Breton to The Worf Effect has not gone over well with some fans.
    • The preorder bonus, the "Explorer's Pack," has absolutely infuriated some fans with the ability to play as any race on any faction, claiming that it breaks immersion at best and defeats the entire purpose of even having factions at worst. Many have pointed out that it contradicts lore (the most obvious example being that human races being in the Aldmieri Dominion makes no sense given the institutionalized Fantastic Racism found in Altmer society), for no other reason than for a blatant cash grab. While some fans were willing to let the Imperial thing slide, the backlash to the Explorer's Pack was far worse.
    • Changing the game to buy-to-play and adding a cash shop for cosmetic items (costumes, vanity pets, and mounts): An excellent opportunity for those who can't afford or didn't want to pay a monthly subscription, or the start of a poor community and pay-to-win?
  • Crack Is Cheaper: The original payment model: First you have to buy the game itself (and the collector's edition was a good chunk more if you wanted its bonuses such as horses and the Imperial race), and THEN you have to pay the subscription fee!
  • Demonic Spiders: Literally, in this case. Spider Daedra summon miniature spiders, and have one of the most annoying Damage Over Time abilities in the game, because it's an area-of-effect. Storm Atronachs also get special mention, because not only are they a common headache at Dark Anchors, Sorcerers have an Ultimate ability in Daedra Summoning to summon them on you, too!
  • Ensemble Darkhorse: The Ebonheart Pact is becoming very popular with fans due to the faction being consisted of well liked races (The Nords, Argonians and Dunmer). Plus it has a kickass Dragon insignia.
    • The Breton from the trailers, due to his sheer knife-throwing, acrobatic badassery.
    • Razum-Dar from the Aldmeri Dominion is very popular in his own right, probably because he's the funniest and most engaging NPC in the Dominion.
  • Game Breaker: The deconstruction mechanic is this for crafting. When using Woodworking, Blacksmithing, and Clothing, you have the option to take pieces of equipment for that craft and breaking them down into base components and get some crafting EXP in the process. It becomes ridiculously easy to horde loot from defeated enemies and gain tons of ore, wood, hide, and race motif items, as well as easily level up your associated skill. Even better, you can simply steal everything not nailed down in the (respawing) market stalls, not only making it trivial to gather huge amounts of resources with little effort, but allowing you to craft 'clean' items that the guards won't take from you if caught.
  • Goddamned Bats: When it comes to Daedra, you will very quickly grow to loathe Banekin and Scamps. They're Glass Cannons that can hit you with AOE fire spells, which, naturally, give you some Damage Over Time as well.
  • Good Bad Bugs: Borders on Game Breaker. Animation Cancelling. Done by exploiting the 'animation priority,' nimble-fingered players have found that rapidly chaining together a light attack, an ability, and then a bash in that order cancels the animation of the previous action and leads right into the next one, effectively allowing you to spam abilities and dish out insane amounts of DPS by negating the game's version of a global cooldown. In the hands of a destruction staff user with Elemental Drain, this can be a deadly combination, because you will never run out of Magicka. ZoS themselves have admitted that they never thought this was possible, but because it's technically not an exploit, they aren't sure what to do about it. Cue Player Versus Player enthusiasts starting an Internet Backdraft.
  • Hype Backlash: Given that the game was heavily advertised for a few years, and had its admittingly epic looking cutscenes shown, many fans felt ready for an Elder Scroll MMO. When the game came out, that hype turned into Internet Backdraft for the game's issues.
  • Internet Backdraft:
    • The initial subscription fee caused this, since it meant players had to pay to play the game they just bought, in addition to the monthly subscription fee.
    • The Imperials being both in the game, and only available if you buy the Collector's edition cause a massive issue with fans, since it both ignored the lore, and just gave more reasons to give money to the game.
    • The lack of money, auction houses, or good player economy really made a problem with players because gold is so hard to come by that their is no real economy for players to work with.
    • The Steam release of the game. Zenimax announced several times on the official ESO forum that the existing version of the game is not compatible with Steam and can only be added as a non-Steam game, and only new accounts would get the benefits of having it on Steam, such as the trading cards. They also released a special dog vanity pet (one of the most asked for pets) for new accounts made on the Steam version - and new accounts only; it wasn't a code that could be applied to existing accounts if one were to purchase a second version of the game.
    • Changing the game to buy-to-play and adding a cash shop. Many players dislike the idea of a cash shop in particular, fearing that it might mean pay-to-win (and if not, you still have to pay to get "all" content in the game).
  • Memetic Mutation:
    • "Transcription Error" has slowly become a popular one. To elaborate, the game developers made a haphazard retcon when making Cyrodiil into an European temperate grassfield as seen in Oblivion instead of the rainforest it was depicted as at that point of time, which the game developers handwaved by essentially calling Pocket Guide to the Empire, the key source of information on Tamriel, false... even though there are numerous books and even firsthand accounts by NPCs that say otherwise.
    • "Oh, look at that! Two gold coins!" became a popular joke on certain forms and videos where players would loot a boss or quest boss and find more than just a single gold coin.
    • "Stay moist" is something you'll hear players say occasionally; it's a phrase that Argonian NPCs say.
  • Misblamed: One of the most common complaints about the game is the idea that Bethesda won't have any time or energy to make a new single-player Elder Scrolls game if they're busy with an MMO. That might have some validity... if the game wasn't being developed by Zenimax Online, Bethesda Game Studio's sister studio under the Zenimax LLC group.
    • It's likely gamers were thinking of the Warcraft RTS series which did get put on hold for World of Warcraft. Zenimax LLC deciding to set up a separate company to develop an online Elder Scrolls game was likely done to keep such a situation from happening. Bethesda Game Studios having no experience with MMOs was probably another factor.
  • Most Annoying Sound: "Did you hear some stranger saved King Casimir's life?" "I'd like to buy that hero an ale!" If you spend any amount of time in Daggerfall after an early quest arc, you are going be hearing this background conversation over and over and over...
    • It's the exact same in the Dominion, too.
    • Not even the Ebonheart Pact is safe.
    • Spiders make an obnoxious noise when they detect you.
  • Nightmare Fuel: The end of the Arrival Trailer has the corrupted Breton and an army of undead take the capital of Cyrodiil by surprise, with Molag Bal's face smiling diabolically in storming clouds in the background.
  • Paranoia Fuel: During PVP in Cyrodiil. The map itself is huge and there are plenty of places in Cyrodiil to explore, but keep in mind that you can be ambushed by other players at any time... any time.
  • Rescued from the Scrappy Heap: To a extent, the High Elf race was. After Skyrim where they were both In-Universe and Meta scrappies (or at least those associated with the Thalmor were), a lot of players enjoyed their quests due to the approach the Thalmor go to to win the trust of their allies (such as basically saving one city when it's attacked) and some likeable High Elf NPC's that stand out.
  • Scrappy Mechanic: Several. Angry Joe covered some in his review and includes:
    • Extremely low money drops. Many enemies only drop a single gold. Bosses tend to drop only a few more than that. To put this in perspective, a passable horse costs about 20,000 gold and a good horse will cost about 50,000 gold. If you can't afford a horse? Have fun walking across the country sized map to the next city.
      • What's worse is that if you want a horse you essentially have to upgrade to a collector's edition. This means to buy a horse, you either grind for hours and hours, or Bribing Your Way to Victory.
    • No player houses. Given that previous games offered everything from small shacks to mansions this has upset many players. Zenimax did confirm that housing is coming, they just wants to "do it right."
    • Quests progress individually for each player. This makes grouping both tedious and completely pointless. This also means fighting over loot since treasure doesn't respawn for each character in the party.
    • Because of the way classes are set up, it's entirely possible to have a spec set up that makes you unable to deal sufficient damage to enemies.
    • The Veteran System. Loathed for being obscenely grindy to the point where players who are Veteran Rank 14 are routinely accused of having no life, the game developers themselves have admitted that not only do they agree that it's not fun, but it was so grindy that they acknowledged that it encouraged exploits just to make the game playable at endgame. They have since doubled the amount of veteran points earned, slashed the amount needed to advance, and eventually did away with veteran points altogether, and have since confirmed that they will scrap this system entirely in the future.
  • Tainted by the Preview: Some fans get increasingly excited for new info and news about the game, whereas other fans get increasingly more disappointed.
  • They Changed It, Now It Sucks: The choice to make the game a MMO instead of a single player game was the biggest criticism amongst its fans.
  • That One Boss: Doshia in one of the Fighter's Guild quests before she was nerfed. Doshia could be immensely difficult at low levels despite the quest being aimed for low levels. It was highly recommended that you fight her at a level 20+ because if you're any lower she would've absolutely mopped the floor with you.
    • While Doshia is not an easy boss to any extent, she's not nearly as hard as some people would make her out to be. Most players don't always realize that by simply skirting around her constantly while killing her healing bubbles, she can be killed even if the player is underleveled.
    • Gutsripper from the Mage's Guild also stood out as a giant pain in many asses before he got nerfed as well.
    • Praxin in Veteran Spindleclutch. If you didn't think Spiders Are Scary before, you will. The Zerg Rush of little spiders at the beginning is bad enough without the three more waves that follow, and sometimes, it will even bug out causing all of the waves to come at once, essentially making this boss a Luck-Based Mission.
  • That One Level:
    • Veteran City of Ash. Oh, where to even begin... in order to get the 100% Completion achievement for this dungeon, you will need to run it at least thirteen times to get all of the Flame Colossi, and that's not even counting the Nobody Dies achievement, which you need probably need a team of That One Player's to get. God help you if you're a vampire.