YMMV / Rebecca

  • Alternative Character Interpretation:
    • Is Maxim a villain, hero or anti-hero? Is everything Maxim says about Rebecca true? Do Maxim and the Second Mrs de Winter get a happy ending or not? All open to interpretation.
    • A minor one regarding Mrs Danvers's trick on the heroine. Was tricking her into dressing up as Rebecca just a Kick the Dog moment as revenge for being stood up to? Was she hoping to remind Maxim of the love she thought he felt for Rebecca, further ruining the new marriage? Or was it some way for her to get to see Rebecca (or someone who resembled her) one last time?
    • The second Mrs de Winter staying with Maxim after finding out he's responsible for Rebecca's death. Does she truly love him in spite of it? Or is she realising her best chance for comfort is staying with him - since she's an orphan and has no other family to speak of?
    • There's the possibility of Rebecca being a lesbian who only married Maxim because it was expected of her - especially given her closeness to Mrs Danvers.
  • Award Snub: The film is one of the few films which won the Best Picture Oscar without the film's director also winning Best Director. Presumably this was because Hitchcock was a relative unknown in the US at the time, or because the film's producer David O. Selznick had a reputation for having a high degree of creative control over the films he produced, often essentially directing the films himself.
  • Fanon:
    • The heroine's real name being Daphne. It was this in early drafts, and the film considered giving it to her. However there's no confirmation, except that her narration says it's uncommon and people often misspell it.
    • The painting in the hall being of Rebecca. It actually is a painting of Maxim's ancestor, Lady Catherine, as Mrs Danvers says. The plot point is that Rebecca dressed up as her once at a costume ball.
  • Fans Prefer the New Her: Yes the costume for the ball ends up horrifying Maxim, and his poor wife is nearly Driven to Suicide over it. But that doesn't stop Joan Fontaine from looking fantastic in the dress.
  • Freud Was Right: It's a Hitchcock film; what did you expect?
  • Fridge Logic:
    • The new Mrs. de Winter's response to learning Maxim de Winter killed Rebecca? "He never loved her and says he loves ME — let's help this poor woobie husband of mine so we can never speak of this again!" and she then agrees to help him.
    • It was suggested elsewhere that Rebecca was just as much of a bitch as Maxim says she is. Beatrice walks on eggshells on the topic because she knew that Rebecca seduced her husband, Mrs. Danvers openly talks about how Rebecca took advantage of men and laughed about it, and the end makes it pretty clear that she was pushing Maxim's buttons for him to shoot her. Granted, the second Mrs. de Winter didn't know that last bit when Maxim confessed to the murder, but then most of her issues stemmed from Mrs. Danvers saying over and over "Oh, you're just someone pathetic that Maxim felt sorry for; he still loves Rebecca."
  • Hilarious in Hindsight: Favell tried to break up Maxim and Rebecca's marriage. Fast forward to All About Eve where George Sanders (who plays Favell) expresses disgust that Eve plans to break up Karen and Lloyd's marriage. What makes this even funnier is that Anne Baxter (who would play Eve) screen tested for this film.
  • Hollywood Homely: Subverted in the film version. Mrs Danvers, Mrs Van Hopper and Favell all call the heroine plain and act as if she's deformed. She's played by Hollywood beauty Joan Fontaine. But this is used to show that the characters are nasty and it's made clear that Maxim finds his new wife beautiful. Likewise, the majority of plain comments come from Mrs Danvers - and she's comparing her to Rebecca, with whom she was deeply in love. Beatrice even seems to find her pretty. Overall it seems to be that she has a natural beauty but she's not glamorous enough to meet the high standards of the upper class.
  • It Was His Sled: The twist that Maxim actually hated Rebecca is far more well known these days. With the Alpha Bitch trope becoming commonplace, modern viewers can pick up on the way other characters describe her.
  • Les Yay:
    • Implied (much more heavily in the book) to be a major component of Mrs. Danvers' devotion to Rebecca.
    • Depending on the staging, Mrs. Danvers tends to have a rather sensual manner towards Mrs. de Winter during the song "Rebecca" and it's reprise, with far more touching than necessary or appropriate. In the latter's case, it even becomes suggestive of sexual assault in certain versions, as Mrs. de Winter is only half dressed in her nightgown, and certain versions, the Hungarian for example, have Mrs. Danvers back her onto Rebecca's bed.
  • Magnificent Bastard: Rebecca.
  • Rewatch Bonus: On the second watch, you can see subtle hints - especially from Beatrice - that Rebecca wasn't as perfect as everyone says.

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/YMMV/Rebecca