YMMV / Over the Hedge

YMMV tropes for the comic strip:

YMMV tropes for the movie:

  • Adaptation Expansion: Despite being credited as "based on characters created by Michael Fry and T. Lewis," the only characters retained from the strip are RJ, Verne and Hammy. This was Lampshaded in later strips in which crude cut-outs of the movie characters were pasted into scenes with the main three and treated as though they've always been there.
  • Award Snub: A nomination snub against Monster House, Cars and Happy Feet.
  • Crowning Music of Awesome: Arguably the whole soundtrack, considering it's mostly Ben Folds.
  • Designated Villain: Vincent the bear spent the whole summer gathering food to survive, but he is portrayed as a bad guy for threatening to eat RJ if he didn't replace it once he accidentally destroyed it. They seem to have realized this during the production and added in a line about how Vincent got to where he is by selling out, betraying, murdering, etc. all of his former friends and another line where he praises RJ for being just like him once he sells out his friends. Not to mention that, you know, the time RJ visits him is at the start of spring, making the size of his foodpile a bit weird (how much did he stack up on if what RJ destroys is what's left after winter?) and giving Vincent more than enough time to fill up his reserves for the next winter himself even though punishing RJ for destroying his food was justified.
  • Do Not Do This Cool Thing: Wow, stealing all those goodies sure looks like fun!
  • Dueling Movies: Open Season.
  • Funny Moments: Pick ANY scene with Hammy. Chances are either it's funny or awesome.
  • Jerkass Woobie: RJ might be stealing, but he has to eat something.
  • Launcher of a Thousand Ships: RJ, who has been paired with nearly every major character, most notably Heather, Stella, Ozzie, and Hammy. Most noticeably, he seems to constantly flirt with Verne in the movie. It's probably the closest to being canon in both the comic strip and the film
  • The Problem with Licensed Games: Subverted with the video game; it's pretty good.
  • Some Anvils Need to Be Dropped: The entire film is a satire of American consumerism.
    RJ: They always got food with them. We eat to live - these guys live to eat! Let me show you what I'm talking about! The human mouth is called a 'piehole', the human being is called a 'couch potato'. (signifies telephone) That is a device to summon food. (signifies doorbell) That is one of the many voices of food. (signifies front door) That is the portal for the passing of food. (signifies many delivery trucks) That is one of the many food transportation vehicles. Humans bring the food, take the food, ship the food, they drive food, they wear the food! (signifies grill) That gets the food hot! (signifies cooler) That keeps the food cold! (signifies turtle pinata) That...I'm not sure what that is. (kids break the turtle piñata and Verne yells) Well, what do you know? FOOD! (signifies table where family prays before dinner) That is the altar where they WORSHIP food! (signifies advert for Seltzer) That's what they eat when they've eaten TOO MUCH food! (signifies treadmill) That gets rid of the guilt so they can eat MORE FOOD! FOOD! FOOD! FOOD! FOOD! FOOOOOD! So, you think they have enough? Well, they don't. For humans, enough is never enough! And what do they do with the stuff they don't eat? They put it in gleaming silver cans, just for us! (knocks over a trash can) Dig in!
    • Loses a little of its sting from the fact that the movie was merchandised out the wazoo when it first came out, with its name and characters slapped on just about every product imaginable (including, yes, food).
  • Squick: Verne very nearly eating a diaper.
  • Viewer Gender Confusion: The porcupine triplets. Out of the three, only Spike has a confirmed gender (Penny and Lou refer to him as "he" when talking about how the triplets kept waking their mother). Bucky, due to the male name and the male voice actor (actually played by the son of the director, Sami), is most likely also male. The last triplet, Quillo, is ambiguous. The name doesn't really have any implied gender, Quillo is voiced by a girl, and the triplets are always refered to as "kids", which could imply that at least one of them is a girl.

YMMV Tropes for the Video Game:

  • Anti-Climax Boss: The final boss. It's completely stationary, has an easy-to-hit weak point, and is aided by enemies that aren't likely to pose any sort of threat.
  • No Problem with Licensed Games
  • That One Level: The penultimate level. It comes in two parts: the first has the player(s) traversing a hallway thoroughly covered by motion sensors and security cameras (which cause damage if triggered) to clear out four rooms of enemies, in order to activate an elevator. The second part is the elevator ride, which involves dodging an increasingly complex laser grid which, if triggered, will send enemies to kill you. Both sections are long, arduous, and will likely involve taking a lot of damage with not nearly enough healing to go around. And finally, screwing up one segment means having to start it over.
    • Level 4, "Projector Heist", for the gauntlet of traps at the beginning of the level. You'll likely be either stumbling into hazards trying to fight enemies, or get hit repeatedly by enemies while trying to sneak past a motion sensor (which will then result in setting off the motion sensor and taking more damage).