YMMV / Not Always Right


  • Acceptable Targets: Stories about the Twilight franchise and clueless fans of it abound. Most of them are named "The Twilight of Our Literacy, Part X".
  • Alternate Character Interpretation:
    • The well-mannered boy who takes his mother on a "date": naturally sweet and charming, or raised so tightly and harshly that he was effectively forced into those manners?
    • In this story about a cashier trying to get enough money out of a customer who is setting up a cable account for her friend, said customer says at one point "All right, fine, but now Iím giving you my money!", implying part of her stubbornness with making the full payment was because she'd been given only the original $40 from her friend and was frustrated that she had to pay the remaining $83 out of her own pocket.
    • The wife in this story is probably from a part of the US where "Coke" actually is used to refer to soda in general, making her dismay over actually being given Coca-Cola a case of culture shock rather than stupiditynote .
      • There are actually quite a few anecdotes where the Extra Stupid tag only makes sense if they're from the same culture they're currently in and/or if they have a certain assumed baseline education that may not be a fair standard to call people stupid about. It makes sense to tag it stupid if they're in Advanced Studies of X and fail to grasp basic 101 information about X; in the absence of that context, it makes far less sense if they simply don't know a particular word, or a particular detail of biology, or if they confuse a couple of minor wars or the like.
    • There's a story about a man who gets some grief from a server who notes that he said he was allergic to tomatoes, but was eating his fries with ketchup. The man responds that it's only raw tomatoes he's allergic to—the substance that triggers a reaction is destroyed during cooking/processing. Perhaps that was also the case in this story, where a man describes himself as deathly allergic to tomatoes but orders a sandwich with extra ketchup, to the bemusement of the submitter.
    • This woman repeatedly asks for peanuts, but what she really wants is cashews. But she calls them peanuts. Is she just being stubborn, or does she think peanuts and cashews are the same thing with different names?
    • One person who needed to fast before some tests at the hospital answered "No" repeatedly when asked multiple times if he'd eaten or drank anything, including medicine. Then he finally says at the end he drank milk to take his medicine, then ate a plate of eggs. Did he really, or was he being sarcastic because he got annoyed with being asked the same thing over and over again?
    • The mother in this story. Was she an overprotective mother trying to teach her son about "stranger danger", or was she just at the end of her rope after listening to her kid's non-stop talking?
    • When the manager tells the submitter to go home at the end of this story, was it a punishment for receiving the complaint, or was it more in the vein of "Go home and cool off before you have to deal with any more morons"? If it was the former, was it because the manager didn't believe someone would complain about something so stupid and thought the employee was lying, or is that SOP for complaints and his hands were tied?
  • Archive Binge: Combined with a mild case of Bile Fascination, this site can occupy you for days. But if you want to pick up where you left off in the archive, read it by month. The /page URLs aren't stable because the site presents newest posts first. And then there's the spin-off sites...
  • Big Lipped Alligator Moment: A fair few stories are essentially someone's Real Life BLAM experience.
  • Broken Base: Some people aren't fond of the more obviously fake stories, claiming they ruin the site's integrity or are just poorly written (said stories usually follow the same generic framework of "narrator or their manager calls out an asshole, they get applause/tips from everyone else"). Others enjoy them as pure Snark Bait.
    • Any issues are, however, mitigated a bit by the fact that the most obviously fake stories are kept in the 'Unfiltered' section and don't end up on the main site.
    • The addition of the comments section is a hugely divisive. Some visitors are happy that they get to share their thoughts on the stories, while others hate how much of a Troll magnet the system can be.
    • When it was announced that the editors would stop cross-posting stories(taking a story posted on one site and reposting it on another in lieu of a new story), the response was generally positive. When a story from NAH got cross-posted to NAW sometime later, the comments were split between those calling out the editors for not sticking to their word, and those thinking the former group needs to take a chill pill.
  • Crazy Awesome
    • Combined with a big old shot of Hot-Blooded here.
    • This married couple uses loud bird calls to find each other in case they get separated in large stores.
    • The unicycling Easter bunny mentioned under Big Lipped Alligator Moment counts.
    • The young man in this story.
  • Crosses the Line Twice: The security guard in this tale had his home in Kenya burn down not once, not twice, but three times by the age of 22 due to faulty wiring, so he learnt how to diagnose wiring in order to prevent it from happening again. Pity that when he was 23 it burnt down again, but this time due to a drunk driver in a truck, not bad wiring. Cue him doing a Screw This, I'm Outta Here! and moving to the United States.
  • Darkness-Induced Audience Apathy: A lot of people are turned off by the websites because of the sheer amount of stories about ignorance and cruelty. This could be why the latest site(as of March 2016) is "Not Always Hopeless" which focuses on more cheerful, heartwarming stories. And even that isn't completely immune to this because a lot of stories, even if they all have heartwarming endings, have depressing beginnings involving jerks that wouldn't be out of place on the other sister sites.
  • Designated Hero: While the homophobe in this story certainly warranted some kind of retribution, the little girl decides the best solution is to walk up to him and start kicking him repeatedly without trying to talk him down or him even acting violent first. When he defends himself by restraining her (which he has every right to), the other patrons tackle him to the floor, then call the cops on him, lying about how he "assaulted a little girl" when all he did was grab her arm to stop her from assaulting him. And then the little girl gets rewarded for escalating a verbal conflict to a physical one.
    • This mother, guilt-tripping the cashier about her grief the cashier had no way of knowing about, to punish the cashier for making small talk.
    • This OP, picking on a child for not feigning enough enthusiasm/not being extroverted enough.
    • The girl in this story. The story makes her out to be the victim because her teammates were angry with her, seemingly ignoring the fact that she bailed on them in the middle of a baseball game to go get ice cream.
  • Disproportionate Retribution: These employees. Yes, the lady was obnoxious, but was it really necessary to withhold her car keys as revenge?
  • Extreme Doormat: This cashier and security guard don't know what to do with a customer making a scene, so they reward him with free food.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight:
  • Idiot Plot: This story. The manager could have been more understanding, but it took a long series of abysmally bad decisions on OP's part to get into this situation in the first place.
  • Inferred Holocaust:
    • If you think about it too much, it may become horrific.
    • Along with this one.
    • Arguably, any story where a customer tries to get their kids involved. Delinquency of a minor is a major offense, and if the offender already had a criminal record, the reports could have DCS take them away from their family (though if things were that bad, it would be for the better).
    • How easily some parents leave their children alone with a stranger, not only in this church daycare, but also mistaking lifeguards and cashiers for babysitters.
  • Informed Wrongness: This customer is shamed for complaining because the photo lab advertises service with a device which doesn't function reliably with a guarantee which is void whenever it would come into force.
  • Jerkass Woobie: The guy in this story who is a total jerk who constantly yells at the cashier, ending his ranting by telling them that there's Always Someone Better in the job field who will always do the same thing you do for cheaper and better. He was rude, for sure, but then you realize that this is likely happened to him. Still doesn't excuse him for attempting to demoralize a complete stranger, but still...
  • Misaimed Fandom: Ever since comments were added to the websites, you will often find people who side with the customer, or at least point out flaws in the submitter's logic.
  • Nausea Fuel:
    • One story on the site mentions a pair that were once thrown out for vandalism in a library, because they refused to pay late fees. How were they vandalizing it? They were pissing and shitting all over books, and had been at it long enough for each of them to destroy an entire section while the police were on their way.
    • Another story has a customer who lowers their pants only to reveal that they are wearing an adult diaper that is soggy and yellow like popcorn butter.
    • This story has a customer trying to get a refund for a jug of spoiled milk without the receipt. To "convince" the cashier that it's bad, she dumps the rancid milk all over the counter.
  • Paranoia Fuel: It's bad enough when a robber enters your store and threatens you with a gun. Now we gotta deal with people who like to pretend they're robbers!
  • Strawman Has a Point:
    • In this story, a customer in a Maryland Dollar Store gets wound up over being presented with a Canadian nickel instead of an American one for her change. Although the small denomination and the customer screaming at the cashier certainly didn't help the issue, the cashier's claims that foreign currency "is still worth five cents" and that "any store will accept it" simply aren't true.
  • Unintentionally Unsympathetic: This atheist couple are clearly meant to be the "good" customers in contrast to the stingy religious customers, but considering that the only reason they would mention they're atheists would be to compare themselves to religious people and their idea of "everything worthwhile about religion" is "nothing", they come across as incredibly smug and self-righteous Hollywood atheists.
  • What Do You Mean, It's Not for Kids?: The submitter's mom wants to know if Pan's Labyrinth would be a good movie to show to kids asking on behalf of her friend. Thankfully after the submitter explains how violent the film is the submitter's mom says she will tell her friend not to show it to them.


http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/YMMV/NotAlwaysRight