YMMV: Myst

  • Deader Than Disco: Myst was hailed as incredibly innovative when it debuted and drove sales of CD-ROM drives. For a while, it was the best-selling computer game of all time. With the death of the adventure game and the advent of video cards with 3D rendering, most gamers look at Myst as a relic of the '90s and an example of everything wrong with the early '90s "multimedia" movement. The series still has a devoted cult following, like many other adventure game franchises.
  • Genre-Killer: Of the inventory management Point-and-Click. (Though it is reviving due Tell Tale Games and many Indie games)
  • Fanon Discontinuity: Depending on your perspective, Myst V and Uru, Myst IV, the novels, or even the first four games, largely due to the series' massive Ret Cons and Literary Agent Hypotheses.
  • Magnificent Bastard: A'Gaeris
  • Porting Disaster: Porting the original game to the Nintendo DS did not go so well, given the DS's lower resolution and lack of a context-sensitive mouse cursor.
    • It's worth noting that, other than very minor issues with the smaller screen, the port to the PSP is actually quite good.
    • The 3DS version isn't much better than the DS version. It uses a cursor at least, but it doesn't use the 3D functions, nor does it use the touch screen for anything important. The cursor is controlled by the Circle Pad, and it re-centers whenever the Circle Pad is released, making it a real pain to control. What makes it worse is the blatant false advertising of the promotional materials, which claim that it displays in 3D, when it doesn't.
  • Seinfeld Is Unfunny: This could hardly be called Scenery Porn today... but consider the game debuted in 1993. Everyone else was still thinking in terms of 16-bit at the time. Real time 3D rendering cards can do a much better job these days, even cheap built-in Intel HD chips.
  • That One Level: The infamous Selenitic Age is a pain in the butt to get into, requiring the player to walk back and forth between a keyboard and a soundboard to painstakingly move several finicky switches to juuuust the right pitch, with only their ears as a guide. If the player doesn't have good pitch, they're in trouble. The world itself is somewhat interesting from a spectacle perspective, with lots of strange, ethereal scenery and sounds, but it suffers from the general dated nature of the technology on display and, unlike the other Ages, has no real storyline hints about the brothers, since it was an uninhabited world. And getting out is bastard hard, especially if the player didn't do the Mechanical Age first to learn the auditory cues for the underground maze.
  • That One Puzzle: The underground maze in the original game. Very few players caught onto the fact you were supposed to use the sounds as clues for what direction to take and just mapped the whole thing out...which is particularly nightmarish as the developers specifically designed the puzzle so it would be impractical to do that. Even if you do know how to do the puzzle though, it takes about a century and a half to make it through the whole thing thanks to annoyingly long scene transitions, and if you want both pages, you have to do it twice.
  • Vindicated by History: Despite being mocked by gaming publications as everything that was wrong with gaming in the '90s, Myst is still one of the top-selling games on GOG.com. The visuals and the intriguing (literal) world-building still hold up quite well today.
  • What Do You Mean, It Wasn't Made on Drugs?: The novels-only Age Torus, as mentioned in World of Chaos.
    • In general, Catherine's ages seem to have this in universe. Yeesha even calls her the "writer of dreams".