YMMV / Murder, She Wrote

  • Archive Panic: Going for a solid 12 seasons and about 265 episodes puts the show in this category, to say nothing of the four spinoff movies and the novel series that (as of 2014) numbers somewhere in the 40s and is still going at a rate of two new books a year.
  • Award Snub: Angela Lansbury: 12 Years, 12 Emmy nominations, not a single win.
  • Crossover Ship: Nearly a canon example. The end of the Magnum, P.I. crossover teased Jonathan Higgins and Jessica, although it never went past Higgins quite obviously crushing on Jessica, to her amusement. It was also added to at the end of the syndicated version of the first part, "Novel Connection".
  • Crowning Moment of Funny:
    • In "My Johnny Lies Over the Ocean", Jessica manages to trick the murderer into exposing themselves by pretending to be drunk during the confrontation. It also crosses into a Crowning Moment of Awesome when her niece and another passenger manage to help her expose them.
  • Ear Worm: The famous theme song.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight:
  • Narm: The infamous drive-by swording sequence from "The Celtic Riddle".
  • Narrowed It Down to the Guy I Recognize:
    • Occasionally subverted. In fact, many guest stars turned out to be allies of Jessica's or a Red Herring, while a character played by a much less famous person was the actual killer.
    • Played straight in "A Very Good Year for Murder", where the family patriarch played by Eli Wallach was the murderer.
  • Older Than They Think: The 1959 film version of The Bat shares many elements with Murder, She Wrote, such as mystery writer going to a small town while writing her next novel and getting wrapped up in a real murder mystery.
  • Retroactive Recognition:
    • Kathryn Morris was in one of the TV movies three years before Cold Case premiered.
    • George Clooney and Julianna Marguiles both appeared in episodes (separately) eons before ER made them famous.
    • A young Courteney Cox played Jessica's husband Frank's great-niece, whose wedding sparks the plot of the two-parter "Death Stalks the Big Top."
  • She Really Can Act: Lois Chiles, considered by critics to be a rather flat presence in films like Moonraker and Death on the Nile, improves considerably in "The Return of Preston Giles" - so much so that when she fatally shoots Giles at the episode's end, she's almost chilling.
  • The Scrappy:
  • The Woobie: Kimberly, the granddaughter of the wealthy Henry in "Test of Wills." She's the only one who is truly upset when her grandfather is murdered, because she's arguably the only member of the family who really loves him, and then her fiancÚ is also murdered. Her fiancÚ is exposed post-mortem as having been blackmailing her aunt, and meanwhile, her grandfather turns out to have faked his own murder just to see how the family would react. It's hard to blame her for the way she ends the episode.


http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/YMMV/MurderSheWrote