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YMMV: Monty Python's Life of Brian

  • Awesome Music:
    • Let's face it, do you know anyone who doesn't know "Always Look on the Bright Side of Life"? Even the survivors of a British ship sunk during the Falklands War sang it while waiting for rescue.
    • Often overlooked but still awesome is "Brian", the credits song, which grants a massive booming orchestra and an incredibly talented singer to some of the silliest Coming of Age lyrics you've ever heard. "And he started to shave / And have one off the wrist / And want to meet girls / And go out and get pissed..."
    • After the success of Spamalot, Eric Idle wrote a comic oratorio based on Life of Brian called "(Not the) Messiah," which had dozens of new songs, a full orchestra, and is written in the style of Handel's Messiah. It may in fact be the only comic oratorio in existence.
  • Big Lipped Alligator Moment: For a Monty Python film, Life of Brian is very reasonably paced and well-grounded — save for the scene where Brian falls off of a tower to be saved by a passing flying saucer, taken into space to pass through an intergalactic war, and then brought back to Earth in a crash of alien metal — right at the foot of the same tower. The scene was added merely to give Brian a way to escape the tower.
    • "...you lucky bastard!"
      (Brian shrugs)
    • Soooo could it be called a Big Lipped Alien Moment?
    • Some have speculated that it may be a reference to the conspiracy theories regarding UFOs popping up in the backgrounds of paintings of Christ. Given the amazing amount of research done it's plausible, but doesn't seem to be the case.
    • I thought this was a reference to some of the weirder stuff the Mormons believe in.
    • My personal interpretation is that the "Star of David" seen flying across the sky in the opening of the film is actually the alien ship.
    • It can also be easily chalked up to Rule of Funny, making this an Invoked Trope.
  • Crowning Moment Of Awesome: A meta example. When several members of the various clergies in Britain started targeting the film, John Cleese and Michael Palin went on air to be interviewed and to debate regarding the controversy. When two smug priests begin bashing the film over things that don't happen, both Cleese and Palin tear into them. This is particularly notable in that Palin is doing the verbal smackdown, as Cleese noted years later.
  • Dude, Not Funny!: Far too many examples to list, depending on the viewer's taste.
  • Ear Worm: Always look on the bright side of life...
  • Everyone Is Jesus in Purgatory: This is a film that still remains controversial. Some people assume it's a parody of Jesus, who is actually just a very minor character in the film. Others claim the film mocks Christianity, while it can also be interpreted as mocking religion or blindly fanatical followers in general, for that matter. In a sense it also spoofs the typically heavy handed and deadly serious Bible epics. Some very devout religious people condemn the film for being blasphemous without having seen it. Some religious people who did watch it act as if this movie doesn't mock Jesus, Christianity or religion at all, which is again not totally true either. There are several very outrageous heretical scenes that could easily offend people who take their faith too seriously, but religious people with a sense of humour can enjoy the film just fine. The movie is also more than just a shocking comedy. It raises excellent points about blindly following leaders, misinterpreting so-called signs and messages and not thinking for yourself.
  • Funny Moment: What's so funny about "Biggus Dickus?" I have a vewy gweat fwiend in Wome called "Biggus Dickus."
  • Genius Bonus: Some very early anti-Christian polemics in the Roman Empire alleged that Jesus was the bastard son of Mary and a Roman soldier named Pantera, similar to Brian's paternity.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight
    • The scene were Stan/Loretta defends his right to have babies is even funnier with the advent of Mr. Seahorse fan fiction.
    • "People called Romanes, they go the 'ouse?!" — to anyone who's ever read a computer-generated translation of anything.
      • That scene is also a staple of high school Latin classes across the world.
    • One of the places he film was (supposedly) banned was the city of Aberystwyth, Wales. There was a public showing of the film in 2009, organized by the city's mayor at the time...Judith!
  • Never Live It Down: Brian tries to chase off his followers. It doesn't work.
  • Strangled by the Red String: Brian and Judith end up in bed together despite having had very little interaction beforehand. Admittedly, the film wasn't trying to be a romantic drama.
  • Tear Jerker: The bits between the botched (or successful, depending on your outlook) Suicide Squad raid and the finale. Brian is being crucified, and not even those he loves are going to help him. His lover takes his "martyrdom" with pride, and his mother berates him and leaves him for dead.
    • Subverted, however, when "Always Look on the Bright Side of Life" starts up, which is such a happily optimistic song that it somehow manages to make the crucifixion of the main character and a whole load of other people really cheery.
  • The Woobie: Brian, he never gets a break long enough, and every one of his friends leave him for dead.
  • Woolseyism: The Swedish sub somehow manages to make the "Romanes eunt domum" scene even funnier by having the Centurion translate Brian's original botched Latin as "The Romanians go to the house note ".
    • In the same translation, the cheeky guy who makes fun of Brian's big nose asks: "Where are you from? Nosareth?"


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